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QoS request

Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

QoS request

Hi,
I understand that PN apply QoS to a customers line for good reason too. I just don't know what this service is called but I'd like to request to have it taken off if that is possible. I understand PN have full control over this so I'd like to have it removed please.
My reason for this is simple I am a enthusiast and would like to manage this myself with my new router (RT-N56U).
Cheers guys.
Blim
16 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,059
Thanks: 426
Fixes: 16
Registered: 10-06-2010

Re: QoS request

It doesn't make much sense to do QoS on downstream traffic because that would mean you'd just be queuing it up and maybe even dropping it in your router after the router receives the data, but since your LAN should have more bandwidth than your broadband connection, that would just be slowing things down. The QoS needs to be done before the traffic is sent down your line, not after.
Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

Re: QoS request

That's a good point. My gaming PC is the only thing wired making it the only thing able to reach full speed of my connection and I don't want that queued.
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,059
Thanks: 426
Fixes: 16
Registered: 10-06-2010

Re: QoS request

That suggests data for your wifi devices could end up queuing up in the router, although that's supposed to be a good router, the asus should provide good wifi bandwidth.
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
Fixes: 4
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: QoS request

I agree with 'ejs', and in my opinion the Plusnet QoS should work better than an unrestricted line.
However, if you still want to try your line unrestricted by QoS, you can override it by applying the 'Pro add-on' to your account.
The 'Pro add-on' was more relevant to legacy accounts that had various traffic restrictions, but if you are on the new 'Unlimited' account then you will probably not notice any improvement.
Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

Re: QoS request

Now I'm confused. Is this the same service also used to limit my speed because when it was tweaked the last two times my speed dropped by 1mb to provent the bandwidth from reaching the lines max speed and saturate the connection. Am I right in thinking this is the QoS that was tweaked?
I find it hard to use the word restrictions and fast pace gaming in the same sentence unless I'm talking downloading large files without it being a bad thing.
I thought the pro add-on was to give priority to the main routers/switchers or gateways. I thought there was a QoS applied to individual connection's (end user) to make sure things like streaming, voip and gaming don't  become affected by downloads. Not sure how that would work but that was the impression I got from a post a while back.
I dont think the pro add-on is quite what I'm trying to achieve. I dont want to add a rule. I want to remove the process to eliminate any delay and unnecessary processing of data, allowing for better flow of data.
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,824
Thanks: 1
Registered: 27-10-2012

Re: QoS request

If you're referring to PN's traffic prioritisation (http://www.plus.net/support/broadband/speed_guide/traffic_management.shtml), then I highly doubt PN would remove this. The whole point of it in the first place is to offer users the best service possible across a shared amount of bandwidth. If it was removed (or users could remove it), then you would end up with a degraded service during peak times.
Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

Re: QoS request

No not the traffic management system.
I'm talking about something that will only affect my line only.
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
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Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: QoS request

The BT profile sets the maximum speed that data will be sent from the exchange to your modem.
This is unbuffered, so if data arrives too quickly then random packets will get dropped and your computer will have to request resends.
The Plusnet profile should be very slightly lower than the BT profile and is the maximum rate at which Plusnet send data to your exchange.
This is buffered, so any data overruns here should be handled nicely and no data should be lost.
The Plusnet QoS,  analyses all the packets being sent to your connection and tries to pack as much data as possible into the bandwidth that is available as determined by your Plusnet line profile.  If that bandwidth becomes full, due to heavy traffic loading, then the QoS will drop or buffer the LOWEST priority traffic packets in such a way that your HIGHEST priority packets are not affected.
When you use the 'Pro Add-on' (i.e. switching off QoS), the effect on traffic prioritization is that all packets have equal priority.
This means the previously low priority packets now run at full speed all the time, but this has the effect that when your line is fully loaded, then both high and low priority packets will be dropped.
Therefore it is VITAL that your Plusnet line profile is set correctly, which is probably what you are referring to.
Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

Re: QoS request

There are not other factors involved?
How big is the PN-profile buffer size and can this be turned off without affecting the profile?
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
Fixes: 4
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: QoS request

Quote from: Blim
There are not other factors involved?

Like what ?
There is limited bandwidth to your modem, your Plusnet profile is almost 100% of that maximum datarate, and the QoS seeks to fill that available bandwidth in the most intelligent manner.  What else do you think there might be ?
Quote from: Blim
How big is the PN-profile buffer size and can this be turned off without affecting the profile?

Why would you want to switch any buffering off ?  the alternative would be dropped packets that in turn would cause your PC to request resends.
Those resends then take up capacity on both your upload and download streams with unnecessary additional load, further reducing your bandwidth.
Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

Re: QoS request

would that still be the care if the connection was only running at say half speed?
Is it possible to turn this off then or tweaked in any way?
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
Fixes: 4
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: QoS request

At half bandwidth loading, you should receive ALL your data packets at full line speed - unless you have an old legacy product that has traffic shaping (such as restricting P2P) in the evenings.

Quote
Is it possible to turn this off then or tweaked in any way?

I don't understand what you want to switch off ?, or why ?
Blim
Grafter
Posts: 462
Registered: 06-03-2012

Re: QoS request

bufferbloat.
http://gettys.wordpress.com/what-is-bufferbloat-anyway/
Its a know tweak in the gaming world to turn buffing off on a home router to prevent delay. Old routers never used it back in the day  Roll eyes
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
Fixes: 4
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: QoS request

I can see that switching buffering off on a cheap and underpowered router might have an effect on latency, as some older domestic gateways are barely capable of supporting their specified bandwidth.  Presumably this only happens on the upstream path, i.e. when the user is sending data faster than the line can support.  But even then the gateway would be of particularly poor design, and I can't see this as a widespread problem.
That article, and the articles it refers to, appear to talk about problems from 20 years ago, and also why buffering causes latency when the ISP does not have sufficient bandwidth provision to support all the customers requirements at peak times.
However the network kit at Plusnet has immense throughput capability, and the effect on your individual line wouldn't be measurable, and Plusnet DO have sufficient bandwidth to support their current customer demands.
If you are NOT running your connection at 100% capacity, then buffering latency doesn't apply anyway.
Modern communication buffering systems have a latency of nearly zero, and if latency is experienced then it will be the time that it takes to send the data to you over the slowest part of the network, and not additional time added by the buffers themselves.
The buffering process actually increases throughput, by eliminating delays between successive packets.
The best thing to do to avoid latency is to maximise your connection's sync speed, and ensure your upstream rate is uncapped.