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setting up a wired home network

ChrisL
Grafter
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Registered: 13-12-2007

setting up a wired home network

I'm taking advantage of a house rewire to add ethernet cabling to several rooms. I want to keep using the TG582n router but increase the number of available ports. Can I connect a hub/switch to one of the TG582n ports, for distribution around the house, while keeping the PC and network storage connected to other router ports? In other words, will a switch and sub-switch work as a single network? (This is my preferred configuration, because the new hub would ideally be remote from the existing router and PC.)
Sorry to be a duffus!
Chris
17 REPLIES
VileReynard
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Ideally, connect only one port of the switch to the router.
(But more than one is OK).
All other ports can be connected to the LAN (optionally with switches).
This way only external internet traffic goes via the router.
All purely internal traffic would go via the switch.
You can daisy-chain switches - although it's not ideal!
You can't buy hubs any more.
Switches don't have ip addresses, so your router will see all non-switch devices as a single LAN.

pwatson
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Re: setting up a wired home network

ChrisL - There's nothing wrong at all with your proposed arrangements.
ChrisL
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Thank you both for the replies. I understand what 'vilefox...' is saying, but that doesn't do what I want.  Unfortunately, 'pwatson', I'm still not very clear about how my way would work!
If my PC and an external drive are both connected to the router, which is also connected to the switch, how would a media centre on the other side of the switch identify which (PC or ext. drive) to get a particular file from?  Conversely, how would my PC "see" the different devices connected to the switch?  Presumably, the Home Network page of the router interface would just show the switch as a single connected device?
Am I just being silly?  Is there an idiot's guide to networking that would help me?
Chris
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Re: setting up a wired home network

I use an 8-port gigabit switch connected to my router, basically the router does not 'see' the switch but it sees all connected devices just as though they were connected to the router.  The router still assigns IP addresses to each connected device, whether connected direct to the router or on the other side of the switch, a PC connected to the router will see all visible devices whichever side of the switch they are connected.  Basically, from my experience, it 'just works'.
Just for info, I use a Trendnet TEG-S82g and find it runs completely cool suggesting minimal power consumption and, hopefully, high reliability (available for a reasonable price too: http://www.dabs.com/products/trendnet-8-port-gigabit-greennet-switch-8VWK.html)
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VileReynard
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Re: setting up a wired home network

DHCP (in the router) allocates ip addresses to all devices.
Switches "learn" what devices are connected to them - so it just works.  Cheesy
No reason why some devices can't use wifi either...

ChrisL
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Thank you so much to both!  This is just what I wanted to know *sound of scales falling from eyes*.
(And thanks for the recommendation. I've been looking at Netgear and TP-Link switches, too, and would appreciate any advice anyone wants to give!)
Best wishes
Chris
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Quote from: vilefoxdemonofdoom
No reason why some devices can't use wifi either...

Yes, my printer is wi-fi and the laptop connects to the switch and it still works exactly the same as when the laptop was connected direct to the router.
5-port switches cost less but I'd avoid them as you can quickly run out of ports (one is used to connect to the router so you only get to use 4).
Call me 'w23'
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Re: setting up a wired home network

There's another reason for only having one port connected to the router and connect everything else to the switch: if you buy a gigabit switch you can run your internal LAN at that speed whereas devices connected to the router will be running at 100mbps.
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Quote from: ChrisL
how would a media centre on the other side of the switch identify which (PC or ext. drive) to get a particular file from?  

That is all part of basic networking, where devices broadcast information about themselves.
The switch and router are "lower-level" bits of kit in comparison and not really aware of what is being said on the local network, they just send everything everywhere.
(well not really as they are more intelligent than that to stop unwanted traffic swamping irrelevant connections; but to stop the inevitable torrent of "you're wrong, they do this and that" for the purposes of this discussion that's pretty much all they do)
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Quote from: jelv
There's another reason for only having one port connected to the router and connect everything else to the switch: if you buy a gigabit switch you can run your internal LAN at that speed whereas devices connected to the router will be running at 100mbps.

But you can, of course, utilise spare 100Mb/s router ports for any kit (printers, older PCs etc) that don't have GB ethernet if you need to free up ports on your switch.
Call me 'w23'
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Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
ChrisL
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Thanks again for a useful discussion. Good to know that I can keep the printer on wi-fi (it sits pretty close to the router, and 50 Mbps or so is way fast enough for the use it gets). I don't expect to upgrade the old PC to gigabit working, so that can happily connect direct to the router. Good advice from jelv about connecting NAS and smart-TV, etc, to the new gigabit switch.
I'm about to order one of these http://tinyurl.com/p3l9pn2 unless anybody wants to stop me....?
Best wishes
Chris
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Quote from: ChrisL
I'm about to order one of these
I've got the exact same switch, only a 5-port one as that's all I need.
As for Smart-TV I can't see that needing Gigabit speeds, so it can go on any free port.
I'd connect it based on where its mostly receiving data from, e.g. internet (iPlayer, Netflix etc.) put it on the router, local media server put both on the switch.
ChrisL
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Thanks 'HPSauce', that's interesting. Transfering hd movies, blu-ray, etc, was the main reason I thought I needed gigabit speed!
I'll still go for a gigabit switch because you never know what's round the corner, but I don't do games and stuff so it might be more than I really need.
Chris
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Re: setting up a wired home network

Quote from: ChrisL
Transfering hd movies, blu-ray, etc,
Transferring (copying) or watching?
In theory HD Blu-ray streaming can require up to around 50mbps bandwidth so if you're doing all that locally between devices gigabit might be safest.
Copying files between devices can presumably run faster, assuming the devices are capable of delivering/storing it.