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router for fibreoptic broadband

akldb
Newbie
Posts: 2
Registered: 15-08-2012

router for fibreoptic broadband

I have been given a technicolor TG582n modem/router for my new fibre optic broadband to be installed soon.
The spec. says this is good for 24Mb/s on the WAN port but the FO link is supposed to be good for up to 40Mb/s.
Does this mean I can never exceed 24Mb/s.
Also I already have a Netgear DG834G v3 modem and router with almost identical spec. (except for no "n" wireless and no USB port, neither of which seem important to me.)
Will I be able to use my Netgear device instead as it also supports box to box VPN which I use a lot.
Tony
20 REPLIES
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

The Netgear doesn't support an input to a LAN port so it won't work
The other question - I think you are confusing two things.
The output from the BT modem goes to a LAN port (100Mbps) not the WAN post
Community Veteran
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Quote from: akldb
The spec. says this is good for 24Mb/s on the WAN port

Presumably this means you can upload at up to 24 Mbps?
Community Veteran
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

No
It means that the WAN input/output port - from the telephone line - is limited to 24Mbps which pretty well covers ADSL2+ capability
With fibre which comes in via the LAN port the spec is 100Mbps
From the manual
 ADSL2+ compliance:  ITU-T G.992.5 Annex A, B
Maximum Rate: 24 Mbps for downstream and 2,5 Mbps upstream
VileReynard
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Plusnet do a Netgear wireless router with a 100Mbps WAN port, no USB or ADSL.

AxeMurderer
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Registered: 18-05-2011

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

I think there has been some misinformation on this thread.
The Technicolor 582n has 4 100Mb ports. Normally - with ADSL - these are all LAN ports. But it can also be used with fibre in which case one of the 100Mb ports (I can't remember whether it is port 1 or 4) is connected to the fibre modem and effectively treated as a WAN port. This is different from many fibre-compatible routers which often have a dedicated WAN port for their fibre modem connection.
The Technicolor is capable of at least an 80Mb connection to a fibre router. The quoted 24Mb limit is the maximum speed of ADSL2+, not the LAN (or 'WAN') ports, and not relevant to use with fibre.
For the OP's reassurance, I have had a 582n working at more than 70Mb/s with fibre.
Community Gaffer
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Quote from: AxeMurderer
But it can also be used with fibre in which case one of the 100Mb ports (I can't remember whether it is port 1 or 4) is connected to the fibre modem and effectively treated as a WAN port.

I think it's the first port. The 582n's for fibre have custom firmware installed that allows you to achieve this (although it does mean you sacrifice one of the four LAN ports).

Bob Pullen
Plusnet Product Team
If I've been helpful then please give thanks ⤵

pnf
Grafter
Posts: 266
Registered: 07-11-2007

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

I knew that I'd seen this information somewhere.  I couldn't find it in the User Guide, so I dug out the box that my TG582n came in and the information was there.
In the Technicolor 'QUICK START GUIDE: TG582n' (DSL 368 615 80) that comes with the TG582n it indicates that "socket 4" should be connected to "your service providers network termination unit".  In the supporting diagram it shows a red cable going from port 4 on the TG582n to the 'termination unit' which in turn is connected to the wall socket.
akldb
Newbie
Posts: 2
Registered: 15-08-2012

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Port 4 has a red label stuck next to it, so presumably this is used for connection to the WAN.
I can find no mention in the small amount of documentation at technicolor about using/configuring a LAN port as a WAN port.
Are manuals for these routers available anywhere?
I could have supplied a Netgear ProSafe router with a fast WAN port instead of an ADSL2+ router.
My concern is the loss of box to box VPN which is supported by all the better Netgear routers.
Tony
Superuser
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Quote
I could have supplied a Netgear ProSafe router with a fast WAN port instead of an ADSL2+ router.
That will probably work fine, as long as it will allow you to setup a PPPoE connection on the WAN port.
Capvermell
Grafter
Posts: 417
Registered: 16-12-2007

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

When I spoke to Plusnet sales staff before placing an order with my relative on their line for Fibre Unlimited and asked what make of modem router would be supplied I was told it would be a Netgear and that Plusnet used Netgear now because there has been issues with Thomson modem equipment in the past.
But I open the Plusnet package for today's fibre install only to find it is this Technicolor piece of absolute rubbish that is so cheaply made it doesn't even have a separate aerial.  As the model number starts TG I presume that Technicolor is in fact some rebrand of Thomson, who has probably been sold off by now?
Why is it not made clear when ordering that you will now have two boxes to supply your broadband instead of one and that one will come From BT and one from Plusnet?  Also why does BT Openreachinsist on this happening?  Presumably it is so their fibre modem is matched to their Thomson/Technicolor  equipment in the cabinet to achieve maximum line speed.  But if so why didn't BT make it a wireless VDSL modem router?  Answer I suppose because it saves BT Openreach a bit of money but at the huge price of customers being stuck with two boxes on their living room shelf.  Since most customers require a 4 port  N wireless modem router these days you really would have thought BT and the ISPs could have agreed on a spec they were happy with for a single box.  However I suppose the other router manufacturers object to this as they would then lose a massive amount of router sales?
As the Technicolor looks like complete rubbish and I have a spare Thomson Speedtouch 780WL here from time as a Be Unlimited customer (they replaced it after three years with a TG585v7 and didn't want it back after they replaced it when there line sync stability issues but I'm sure the 780WL probably wasn't at fault) is there anyway this could be used as the router instead by configuring it correctly.  At least it does have decent local wireless coverage in the house which I highly doubt that the El Cheapo Technicolor unit does.
Or am I wrong about the Technicolor and is it an ok router despite all the physical evidence to the contrary.  Also why do Plusnet Sales mislead customers about the make of router that will be supplied and the fact that there will be a separate modem and router for fibre broadband?
VileReynard
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

You can use any separate router - in conjunction with the BT VDSL modem.
A Netgear WNR1000v3 works for me (no separate aerial though).

Community Gaffer
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Quote from: Capvermell
When I spoke to Plusnet sales staff before placing an order with my relative on their line for Fibre Unlimited and asked what make of modem router would be supplied I was told it would be a Netgear and that Plusnet used Netgear now because there has been issues with Thomson modem equipment in the past.

When was that!? I'm a tad concerned if that advice is being given out now? If you can message me the details of the call (number you called from and approximate time/date) then I may be able to find the recording and 'educate' the member of staff you spoke to Wink
Quote from: Capvermell
But I open the Plusnet package for today's fibre install only to find it is this Technicolor piece of absolute rubbish that is so cheaply made it doesn't even have a separate aerial.  As the model number starts TG I presume that Technicolor is in fact some rebrand of Thomson, who has probably been sold off by now?

Yes, Technicolor is the new moniker for Thomson. For a budget router though, I don't think the build quality's all that bad! Huh
Quote from: Capvermell
Why is it not made clear when ordering that you will now have two boxes to supply your broadband instead of one and that one will come From BT and one from Plusnet?

Just looked at the signup pages and that's not the only thing that's misleading IMO. There's a compatible list of hardware that seems to be ADSL-specific and it implies the router has four available LAN ports where it actually has three. I've raised an internal problem to have our content folk revisit the messaging (ref: 74436).
Quote from: Capvermell
Also why does BT Openreachinsist on this happening?  Presumably it is so their fibre modem is matched to their Thomson/Technicolor  equipment in the cabinet to achieve maximum line speed.  But if so why didn't BT make it a wireless VDSL modem router?

FTTx products are offered on a managed install basis. The same way that ADSL was when it was first launched. Thus the engineer visit and Openreach providing their own modem. The choice of router is left to the ISP which is a good thing because I doubt Openreach or Wholesale would be able to offer a solution that suited all of their customers' requirements. FWIW the Technicolor router is our choice. If you were to have fibre installed through BT Retail then you'd end up with a Home Hub 3 rather than the Technicolor. You would still need the Openreach modem though.
Quote from: Capvermell
Answer I suppose because it saves BT Openreach a bit of money but at the huge price of customers being stuck with two boxes on their living room shelf.  Since most customers require a 4 port  N wireless modem router these days you really would have thought BT and the ISPs could have agreed on a spec they were happy with for a single box.  However I suppose the other router manufacturers object to this as they would then lose a massive amount of router sales?

FTTC probably will end up as a self install product before too long. I believe there are limited trials happening already (or due to happen shortly). When this does happen the onus will be on the ISP (not Openreach or Wholesale) to supply a combined VDSL modem/router rather than the separate router and modem that's currently offered. The ISP will also foot the costs for the equipment (and presumably any filters that might be required). You're free to source your own VDSL modem/router if you prefer but I wouldn't expect to find one for very cheap if you do. I'd also recommend keeping hold of the default kit in case you ever encounter a fault with the service.
Quote from: Capvermell
As the Technicolor looks like complete rubbish and I have a spare Thomson Speedtouch 780WL here from time as a Be Unlimited customer (they replaced it after three years with a TG585v7 and didn't want it back after they replaced it when there line sync stability issues but I'm sure the 780WL probably wasn't at fault) is there anyway this could be used as the router instead by configuring it correctly.

No idea. If you can configure it to connect in PPPoE mode and it has a spare WAN (rather than LAN) port then you should be OK. If it doesn't then you're likely to struggle.
Quote from: Capvermell
At least it does have decent local wireless coverage in the house which I highly doubt that the El Cheapo Technicolor unit does.

Be interesting to know your findings one you've tried it?
Quote from: Capvermell
Or am I wrong about the Technicolor and is it an ok router despite all the physical evidence to the contrary.

It performs fine in my house (across 3 floors) but you'll find others round these parts whose experiences aren't quite as favourable. I'm currently using a Technicolor 799vn combined VDSL router/modem on one line and a 582n/Openreach modem on the other. I don't have problems with either of them. My wireless speeds average around 20-35Mbps which is more than enough for the stuff that connects to the lines wirelessly.
Quote from: Capvermell
Also why do Plusnet Sales mislead customers about the make of router that will be supplied and the fact that there will be a separate modem and router for fibre broadband?

I don't think that's intentional.

Bob Pullen
Plusnet Product Team
If I've been helpful then please give thanks ⤵

gaz46
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 13-02-2013

Re: router for fibreoptic broadband

Hi.
Sorry to jump in towards the end of the discussion, but....
Like (seemingly) several others I've been suffering with poor signal strength on the Technicolor router.  I tried a range extender, which didn't work, so have now bought a new (hopefully more powerful) router (ASUS RT-N66U in case its relevant). 
During the setup it asks for a number of details (username/passphrase, DNS settings etc).  Where can I get these from? 
Sorry if it seems like an obvious question.  Although I think I've got a degree common sense I'm not what you'd call an IT expert!
Thanks.
Gaz Cheesy
VileReynard
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Re: router for fibreoptic broadband