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Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

SamP
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

I've read comments in one or two places that Netgear modem/routers are ideal if you have a poor SNR because they will hang in there & synch with the exchange even when the SNR drops to zero.
I bought one for exactly that reason - to replace my generic Connexant chipset PCI modem.
The only obvious result is that the Netgear consistently reports a downstream noise margin  4 or 5 db lower than my old modem.
(This on a fixed 1 Meg connection)
That might explain why they seem so good - if the SNR is actually quite a bit better than it's telling you.
Has anyone had the same experience?
6 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,576
Thanks: 3
Registered: ‎13-04-2007

Re: Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

What you say is not correct. Each device sees noise but some have different filters so some may filter it out better or have more gain. So the netgear doesnt see it as  a lower ratio because of the filtering it is not the same.
Its like you hearing a noise and saying thats load but another person with worse hearing may not hear it as load. I found the best router to be a Guru it cheap but very good.
VileReynard
All Star
Posts: 11,175
Thanks: 303
Fixes: 11
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Re: Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

If you are on a fixed 1M connection, then that should be what you get.

SamP
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

Quote from: samuria
What you say is not correct. Each device sees noise but some have different filters so some may filter it out better or have more gain. So the netgear doesnt see it as  a lower ratio because of the filtering it is not the same.

Well, it's an interesting point.
I doubt if any two modems are identical, but in measuring SNR they are all attempting to do the same thing - assess the line as a medium for broadband connection.
For this reason, the filter design ought to be the same in each case. 
I am old enough to remember when filter design & implimentation were a black art.  This hasn't been true for quite a while.
I do recognise that my sample of two modems is wholy inadequate to support my suggestion - which is why I raised it here & asked for others to report their experience.
SamP
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

Quote from: axisofevil
If you are on a fixed 1M connection, then that should be what you get.

I'm afraid I don't understand your post. 
I mentioned that I'm on a fixed 1Meg connection in order to indicate that the SNR hadn't been altered due to any rate adaption.

I.E.  The only variable in the equation was the modem used, and thus the Netgear modem/router consistently reported a poorer (lower) SNR than the other modem.
VileReynard
All Star
Posts: 11,175
Thanks: 303
Fixes: 11
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Re: Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

Quote from: SamP
Quote from: axisofevil
If you are on a fixed 1M connection, then that should be what you get.

I'm afraid I don't understand your post. 

I.E.  The only variable in the equation was the modem used, and thus the Netgear modem/router consistently reported a poorer (lower) SNR than the other modem.

Since you didn't mention difficulties with attaining the 1Mbit connection, I assume everything is fine and so it doesn't really matter what noise figure is reported.
If you were on MAX, on a reasonably stable line, you should expect all modems to be reporting noise margin figures of about 6dB. If the noise margin temporarily reduces, the modem should try to maintain the sync speed - but eventually it will need to drop the sync rate in order to maintain a reasonable noise margin.
However, some modems will drop your sync rate sooner rather than later - hence the preference for the Netgear.

SamP
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Netgear routers are good in poor SNR situations - well maybe.

Quote from: axisofevil

Since you didn't mention difficulties with attaining the 1Mbit connection, I assume everything is fine and so it doesn't really matter what noise figure is reported.
If you were on MAX, on a reasonably stable line, you should expect all modems to be reporting noise margin figures of about 6dB. If the noise margin temporarily reduces, the modem should try to maintain the sync speed - but eventually it will need to drop the sync rate in order to maintain a reasonable noise margin.
However, some modems will drop your sync rate sooner rather than later - hence the preference for the Netgear.

Sorry, I should have added more background.
1Meg is the best I could get with these stats - some time ago they tried to upgrade me to 2 meg but the SNR would fall to negative numbers & loose sync.
Like everyone else I would love a better rate - scheduling a single download to take place over two nights is a little tiresome to say the least - but I'm never going to get better speeds unless I can improve on these figures.
(Downstream Atten is also terrible at 59db - especially when I could spit at the exchange from here)
So:-
Remove 'Ring' connection - tick
Try Master Skt test jack - to eliminate internal wiring problems - tick
Replace all filters with XF-1e's - tick
Replace modem with a Netgear - tick, but that's where I found this to be a step backwards, i.e. the reported SNR got worse.
I would like to shift to a MAX connection, but at present that would be like shooting myself in the foot.
I thought that others in similar circumstances might buy Netgear because of its reputation - they might like to know that it's unlikely to help.