cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Intersting series of articles on the Register

Community Veteran
Posts: 6,773
Thanks: 257
Fixes: 20
Registered: 16-02-2009

Intersting series of articles on the Register

Latest oneis <a href="http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/06/24/reg_linux_guide_3/">HERE</a>
Quote
The biggie is installing software.
Windows is just an OS, developed by one big team. The apps come separately, from third parties, so you have to go to them to get the software and future updates.
Linux is different: you get the OS, apps, drivers, media codecs and so on all from your distributor, who has assembled them all into a single, more-or-less integrated whole. So to add more software, and to get updates, you go to the distro-maintainer, not to the original source.
Because everything comes from one place, there's a single central package-management tool which you use for just about everything: installing, removing and upgrading the whole system. The main reason we're recommending Ubuntu is because its tool, APT, is the best, and stomps all over the rival RPM system used by Red Hat, Fedora, Mandriva, openSUSE and their relatives. It makes Control Panel | Add and Remove Programs look like a sharpened rock tied to a stick.

Love that quote "It makes Control Panel | Add and Remove Programs look like a sharpened rock tied to a stickGrin
The first was choosing your distro then installing it.
12 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 38,460
Thanks: 1,030
Fixes: 62
Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

As a non Linux user can I ask if the other users agree with the comparison between Ubuntu with APT and the others with RPM
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,773
Thanks: 257
Fixes: 20
Registered: 16-02-2009

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

I am on the fence. I have used yum (the Red-Hat equivalent to apt) and it is OK. Maybe not as full of options as apt is, but it will install software from the command line  Grin
I am more familiar with apt so know only the basics of using yum (yum install/yum update etc)
Steve
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 6,817
Thanks: 315
Registered: 13-07-2009

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

Yum and RPM just totally confuse me when i need something installed Sad
If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.
Not applicable

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

Have used Apt but just copying commands from the Internet - don't know them myself. Installing via Add Software is a breeze and much better than Windows, particularly as you're not going to get all the (potential) rubbish with it.  Removing is also brilliant because you don't have a registry to scour and even then you can't be sure what's left over (which is why I use Revo in thorough mode).
Have to agree with article. except that I don't know what Yum and RPM  are so perhaps my opinion is not really relevant.
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
Fixes: 4
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

On my desktop Ubuntu machines, I would tend to use the "Synaptic Package Manager" to install/uninstall most things, and "Update Manager" for updates.
I have not really bothered looking at the new "Ubuntu Software Centre" as I believe it is a subset of the "Synaptic Package Manager".
On my headless Ubuntu servers, I regularly use the APT family of commands for installation and updates.
I have used RPM for those applications that the package manager does not already contain.
Never used YUM, so no comment.
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 10,994
Thanks: 265
Fixes: 11
Registered: 01-09-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

There is some overlap.
The primary benefit of the new "Ubuntu Software Centre" is that the packages are divided (and sub-divided) by type.
So if you only want Games and RPG ones at that, then this is for you.
The software centre says it has 32,380 "items" available.
Standard Ubuntu is only about 30,276 packages. Grin

Denzil
Grafter
Posts: 1,733
Registered: 31-07-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

I used to use Suse before I switched to Ubuntu and then Linux Mint. We are talking three or four years ago, so it may be better now for all I know, but I found YUM a bit difficult and unreliable. A lot of the things I tried to install failed due to missing dependencies, when the whole point of a package manager is to sort that kind of stuff out for you.
Synaptic is a whole lot easier.
Waldo
Grafter
Posts: 473
Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

Quote from: Oldjim
As a non Linux user can I ask if the other users agree with the comparison between Ubuntu with APT and the others with RPM

Back in Ye Olden Days APT was probably the deciding factor in choosing Debian as a distro; back then Debian had a reputation for being difficult to install & configure but, with APT, by far the easiest to keep up-to-date and upgrade from one release to the next.
The only RPM-based distro I've used in recent years was a SuSE system in my previous job, but that was strictly as an end-user; no experience of whatever it used for package management.
Odd thing about the first Reg article - it recommends Mandriva-based PCLinuxOS over Mandriva itself.
Mandriva was formed from the merger of Mandrake & Connectiva.
Connectiva developed apt4rpm some years ago.
PCLinuxOS is an example of an RPM-based distro which uses APT for package management.... 
IIRC Slackware, which is neither .deb nor .rpm based also has slapt-get as an option for package management.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

apt, with its gui front end synaptic, is probably the best packaging system out there.  it's reliable, easy to use and a number of distributions have opted for it in favour of other systems.  yast with suse was a nightmare as it seemed unable to handle dependencies, whereas apt will install and pull in all the dependencies required.
it helps that a distro is maintained and packages compiled specifically to work properly with the whole system.  it makes updating a breeze and gives the user confidence.
Fenster
Rising Star
Posts: 132
Fixes: 1
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

I have tried Ubuntu before, 'Heron' I think, but couldn't get online with it and that is a deal clincher for me. Tried all sorts, drivers, etc but couldn't get it working. I tried Ubuntu again when Lucid 10.04 came out. Installed it in about 30 minutes and it connected to the Web straight away! That did it for me, no more of Bills rubbish vulnerable OS. If anyone is thinking of using Ubuntu now is the time, 10.04 LTS is the one to try, LTS = Long Term Support, it is supported for the next 3 years and Free in every sense of the word. The Ubuntu community have really embraced the idea to make it as easy as possible for new people (probably coming from Windows) to use.
Not applicable

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

Yes, 10.04 is excellent. Maybe it is because I am more familiar with Linux now but this release is top class.
My experience mirrors your own and haven't had any problems so far.
Mattz0r
Rising Star
Posts: 620
Fixes: 1
Registered: 21-07-2010

Re: Intersting series of articles on the Register

For me, It depends on the use of the box. If I'm gunna host any form of website, I used CentOS - Therefore use "YUM" (which is an rpm based package manager) - For another general use, I go with Debian. I've always been fond of it therefore use "APT" aswell.
They both do the same job, so doesn't really matter which one you use, you'll always get what you need/want as long as you add the correct source repo.
YUM users should be adding the "DAG" repo, as this pretty much has everything you need.
and for apt, the default debian ones should get your sorted. Apart from if you have nvidia Tongue