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FTTC Master Socket

CX
Grafter
Posts: 745
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Registered: 16-09-2010

FTTC Master Socket

Things are looking promising for the September estimate, so with that in mind, I'm mindful of any preparatory works at home/
Like many homes, there are no power sockets near the master socket. I am aware some people have had success in having their master socket swapped with an extension, but I've had another thought.
I came across this photo which suggests that the filtered VDSL is available inside the socket:

We have 6-core cable going from the master socket up to the only extension (in the room above), with two conductors in use.
Presumably one could temporarily run a power extension lead on the day of installation and have FTTC installed as per BT's wishes, and later connect the two wires themselves, and wire this up to a second socket upstairs. Is it fair to assume also that those terminals are on the customer-side of the demarcation point? Are the current FTTC master sockets identical to this?
Has anyone tried this over 2.5m-ish - any issues with crosstalk? (I'm guessing it should work)
10 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,735
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Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: FTTC Master Socket

Quote from: CX23880
filtered VDSL is available inside the socket

UNfiltered.  Wink
CX
Grafter
Posts: 745
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Registered: 16-09-2010

Re: FTTC Master Socket

D'oh, you're right. Smiley
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: FTTC Master Socket

I've got one of those now on my ADSL2+ service instead of an "old school" filtered faceplate.
(I've used both ADSLnation and the BT variety)
CX
Grafter
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Registered: 16-09-2010

Re: FTTC Master Socket

I think I misunderstood what these are. I assumed that it (rather wastefully) replaced the entire NTE5 unit, but upon further reading I understand that it's actually just a faceplate. Quite a clever design.
So theoretically it could be removed entirely, and go back to filtering at the extension, OR, hard-wire the DSL as I planned.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 31-08-2007

Re: FTTC Master Socket

Stumbled across this whilst looking for something else. It should NOT be removed completely as you would be left with a standard unfiltered front plate, which if you plug anything into it will degrade your vDSL speed. Secondly the vDSL plate is BT property, the demarkation point is still the removable lower front plate.
In theory you could use one pair in a Cat5e cable to run the unfiltered vDSL to an RJ11 socket, and another pair from the front plate for filtered phone line to a standard secondary socket.
CX
Grafter
Posts: 745
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Registered: 16-09-2010

Re: FTTC Master Socket

Quote from: Anotherone
In theory you could use one pair in a Cat5e cable to run the unfiltered vDSL to an RJ11 socket, and another pair from the front plate for filtered phone line to a standard secondary socket.

This is what I've done (on ADSL with my own unbranded SSFP), but is it permissible to hard-wire a dedicated DSL extension to an SSFP owned by BT Openreach, bearing in mind the demarcation point? For the early versions of the faceplate, the question was moot, as they didn't have the internal unfiltered terminals, but my understanding is that all SSFPs now have them.
My argument would be that those terminals are on the end-user side of the SSFP, but given that the Openreach VDSL modem belongs to Openreach, could they argue that everything up to the RJ45 socket on the modem is "theirs".
I understand why BT have been strict with FTTC installations, as there is some awful internal wiring in use with ADSL. But in situations where the extension wiring is simple, and modern, it would be nice to have a bit more flexibility. Perhaps not full self-install, but at least give the engineers the permission to check the signal at an extension, rather than running their ugly "data extension kit" cable around your home.
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,100
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Registered: 31-08-2007

Re: FTTC Master Socket

I suppose technically the demarcation point is the front most Test socket, ie the one on the vDSL plate in an FTTC case. There's nothing stopping you changing a SSFP on a standard ADSL master and you can connect your own wiring to any available terminals.
jabuzzard
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 22-01-2013

Re: FTTC Master Socket

Quote from: Anotherone
In theory you could use one pair in a Cat5e cable to run the unfiltered vDSL to an RJ11 socket, and another pair from the front plate for filtered phone line to a standard secondary socket.

Does not even need to be Cat5e. I reused the three pair cable that originally came with the Home Highway and was run from the "NTE5" to under the stairs all of about 5m max. It has spend the last seven years running a hardwired filtered ADSL along with the extensions using a the original "modified" faceplate filter from Clarity. Now running via the new interstitial filter and working just fine.
The engineer that did my install was quite accommodating and left the NTE5 dangling as the architrave on an adjacent door needed  trimming back a couple of mm to give the interstitial filter room to fit as it is quite a bit bulkier than the standard faceplate even with a faceplate filter.
What  I don't understand is why they are not allowed to terminate pre existing xDSL extension wiring to the interstitial filter.

Community Veteran
Posts: 19,100
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Registered: 31-08-2007

Re: FTTC Master Socket

For exactly the same reasons that you should use Cat5e (or better) standard cable for vDSL extensions - you will be susceptible to more interference and also/consequentially get lower performance/sync speed. If you are really close to the cab then you may get away with it, but it's not to be recommended.
jabuzzard
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 22-01-2013

Re: FTTC Master Socket

The suggestion to use Cat5e or better is almost certainly down to it's general availability. So while you can buy three pair twisted cable that is to "cat5e" standards you need to be looking specifically for it as few places sell it. In fact the three pair twisted cable I am using I did not even buy, it was supplied by BT over a decade ago as part of the HomeHighway product. I don't live particularly near the box (well I do but the cable route is not as the crow flies) and I am apparently getting a sync speed of 37Mbs, which is what it said when it was plugged into the NTE5 with the interstitial filter, as it was the next day before I wired it up how I wanted it.
By the way I have some "two" pair twisted cable that is to Cat5e standards. It is for use with laptops that only have 100Mbps ethernet adaptors so you can carry less weight around when you are out and about. These days of course everyone uses WiFi.