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Extra routes on a D-Link DSL-2640B????

VileReynard
All Star
Posts: 11,186
Thanks: 305
Fixes: 11
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Extra routes on a D-Link DSL-2640B????

I've recently set up a  D-Link DSL-2640B
I changed it's address from the default 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254
I only need DHCP in the range 192.168.1.64 - 192.168.1.253
All of the above were easy Smiley
However, I've got a ethernet device (a disk) plugged into this router.
The problem is that it has an address of 192.168.0.99
I'd like to add the 192.168.0.xxx network to my router - is this possibleHuh?

4 REPLIES
newmillscomp
Grafter
Posts: 152
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: Extra routes on a D-Link DSL-2640B????

Do you need the route in the router.
You can add the route to your pc quite easily
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: ‎08-06-2007

Re: Extra routes on a D-Link DSL-2640B????

If the router is handing out IP addresses using DHCP, then simply change the subnet mask that it's handing out to: 255.255.0.0 instead of 255.255.255.0
Although, you will still need to change the subnet mask on the ethernet disk anyway otherwise it won't be able to return any information to the originating IP.
b.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,576
Thanks: 3
Registered: ‎13-04-2007

Re: Extra routes on a D-Link DSL-2640B????

cant you just change the ip address of the disk?  You cant add routes as an ADSL router only routes to the internet not like a real router which can route to each port, You are handing out a big range of ip why do you need so many 4-6 is enough for most people
VileReynard
All Star
Posts: 11,186
Thanks: 305
Fixes: 11
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Re: Extra routes on a D-Link DSL-2640B????

Thanks, everyone.
It's just that IP routing does my head in.
I've given up on this disk - it's an el-cheapo board with a SATA disk attached which operates as a kind of NAS.
It has a web interface and also runs NFS, FTP and SAMBA (Windows networking) servers.
But it configured itself using DHCP to 192.168.0.99
It's obviously a mini-Linux gadget  - which should help.
This was fine whilst using my Netgear router (comes setup as 192.168.0.xxx)
Also fine on the much maligned Thomson router - it allows several local ranges - so adding 192.168.0.xxx to 192.168.1.xxx is easy.
My D-Link - although it seems quite flexible seems to have big problems with static addressing (which I prefer).
When I tried changing the router address to 192.168.0.1 it still sends it's DNS lookups as from 192.168.1.254 - and
then complains that there is no path to 192.168.0.5...
Same with a subnet of 255.255.0.0
So basically, I've given up.
I've set all addresses to DHCP instead of static and then added a pile of exceptions based on ethernet card addresses
so that I get static addresses!
Actually - just this minute - had a bright idea Grin Grin Grin
Before I send the old thomson back - I'll fire it up so that I can use it to access the old disk drive and just possibily, maybe,
change it's ip address and subnet.
BTW The new router will run with DMT, which is a good thing.