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DVD Writer

Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

DVD Writer

Under the properties tab for my dvd writer I see it is possible to change the Region Code up to 4 times, is there any software that would allow me to make it region free and is this common to all dvd writers or do some makes have dvd region free writers ?
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VileReynard
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Re: DVD Writer

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD_region_code#Software_DVD_players
Region coding was cracked a long time ago.

Community Veteran
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Re: DVD Writer

I am still not to clear on this. The article seems to indicate there is RPC-2 protection on modern DVD writers. I would like to rephrase the question I originally asked.
1. Has anyone used software to remove the regional code restriction on a DVD writer and if so can they let me have details and
2. Does anyone know of any make of current DVD Writers that are unrestricted multi region.
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Community Veteran
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Re: DVD Writer

I have used region free software before, but it is not really necessary unless you want to play DVD's from a different region on your pc.
If you are still wanting to make it region free, do a search for "your dvd model region free firmware"
Community Veteran
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Re: DVD Writer

Ah I remember looking into this ages ago.
How much detail can I go into before I upset the mods Smiley
It was some time ago that they (the DVD consortium) made it a requirement that all new players were RPC2 (a region counter in the firmware).
So no new players will be RPC1, I think you'd have to find one around 7-8 years old.
There is a site, which is still going, where people patch firmwares to make them RPC1.
It is here
So you can flash a modified RPC1 firmware to your drive.
Of course, it is a bit minefield getting the right one. Certain drives are just rebadges of other drives, so certain firmwares will work with other drives, etc.
Then you've got the risk of flashing stuff in the first place .. unless it is a cheapo drive you're prepared to replace if you make a mistake then I wouldn't bother.
If it's a laptop then that is more difficult, as you can't easily replace the drive.
Although saying that, I did manage to successfully do an old laptop!
But even with RPC1, Windows has a software counter you have to get around.
You can do that of course, but I'd better not go into it Lips are sealed
Much better is software solution like AnyDVD, which makes the computer think any disc is region free.
Community Veteran
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Re: DVD Writer

BTW if it is writing then there is no real issue, the dvd's you produce will be region free. The RPC cr*p is only really a method for the film companies to charge different prices in different parts of the world.
And if you want to play then a copy of anydvd will do it, or better still rip the dvd and play the divx  Grin
VileReynard
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Re: DVD Writer

A selection of DVD rippers is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD_ripper
Once you've written it to hard disk, you can burn a (writeable) DVD and this will not have region coding.

Community Veteran
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Re: DVD Writer

It's a bit silly really, the old region coding.
Still technically shaky ground discussing it on here I guess Smiley
The companies claimed it was because films were released at different times in different parts of the world.
So it was to prevent harming revenue for the cinemas.
If that was true (which of course it wasn't) then I never understood why older films had region coding when it is possible for a DVD to be region free from the factory.
I agree with Biker, it is just to control prices and sales from the various distribution companies.
Given that many people must buy a £20 player from Tesco's, Google 'x region hack' (x being the model) and enter a simple code via the remote, I wonder why they still bother.
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Re: DVD Writer

AFAIK it's still not by-passable on Blu-Ray players, but then again a lot of Blu Ray films are coming out region free at the moment.
Think another side to the region encoding bit was that different companies distributed different films in different regions and it was revenue protection over that.
Whatever the reason it was all about maximinsing profit and stuff the consumer..
Will Moderate For Thanks
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Re: DVD Writer

Many thanks for your detailed answers,it does seem daft that a standard dvd player can in most cases be converted to multi regional simply by inputting a particular code into the player yet there is all this messing around with DVD writers.
AnyDVD along with a number of other programs will allow you to watch the DVD on your computer and other programs will allow you to write the film to DVD but there is not a single program that guarantee to write to DVD due to the vast number of CSS codes (not even AnyDVD).
I Did ask a specific question and admit this response has wandered a bit from regional codes to CSS codes, but it was the above that prompted me to ask the question in the first place.
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VileReynard
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Re: DVD Writer

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_Scramble_System
Quote
In October 1999, Jon Lech Johansen and two people who remained anonymous reverse engineered the algorithm and DeCSS was released. The CSS algorithm was soon revealed to be easily susceptible to a brute force attack, apart from being an example of the trusted client problem. The algorithm's weakness is primarily due to US government crypto-export regulations, which, at the time, forbade the export of cryptosystems employing keys in excess of 40 bits - a key length that had already been proven to be wholly inadequate in the face of increasing processing power by the time DVD was released (see DES). In addition, structural flaws in the algorithm reduced the effective key length to only around 16 bits, which could be brute-forced by a 450 MHz processor in less than a minute.[2] As a 450 MHz processor was the stated minimum necessary to decompress a DVD-compliant MPEG-2 videostream in realtime, it effectively meant that any computer that could play a DVD could also crack one.
The CSS algorithm has been superseded by the Cryptomeria cipher in newer DRM schemes such as CPRM, or by AES in the AACS DRM scheme used by HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc.