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Canonical CEO admits Unity was a painful change

Community Veteran
Posts: 6,773
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Registered: 16-02-2009

Canonical CEO admits Unity was a painful change

From theInq (http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2154413/canonical-ceo-admits-unity-painful-change)
Quote
LINUX VENDOR Canonical has acknowledged that Ubuntu's shift to the Unity user interface was painful for many of its users but insisted it hasn't led to a decline in the popularity of the Linux distribution.

Strange that, maybe people are staying on 10.04 or whatever was before unutty?
Quote
Canonical's decision to move to Unity was based on its desire to create an interface that works better on devices that do not primarily use mice, such as smartphones, tablets and televisions.

Exactly NOT what most people use on their desk  Crazy
Quote
Silber went on to say that Linux Mint is mainly for "people who want codecs pre-installed and [are] not necessarily concerned about security updates", adding, "it's filling a need but I don't consider it a net-negative for Ubuntu". Silber believes the market is growing fast enough that Linux Mint is not necessarily stealing Ubuntu users, though in browsing popular Linux user forums that might appear to be the case.

Meow!  Mint is not secure  Grin Grin Grin  Crazy

3 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
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Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: Canonical CEO admits Unity was a painful change

[quote=Hairy Biker ]maybe people are staying on 10.04 or whatever was before unutty?
All my machines are effectively on hold at version 10.10, until I find an alternative that is better and has ongoing support.
I tried Mint 12 the other day, and while it is way better than Windows, it wasn't better than Ubuntu 10.10.
The thing that worries me more though are the moves by Sun removing the rights to distribute Java in Linux repositories, and Adobe have already dropped support for 'AIR' on Linux, and have just announced dropping development of 'FLASH' for Linux (except for Chrome browser).
Sun Java - http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,102528
Adobe AIR - http://blogs.adobe.com/flashplayer/2011/06/adobe-air-and-linux-increasing-distribution-on-devices.ht...
Adobe FLASH - http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/250455/for_flash_on_linux_chrome_will_be_users_only_ch...
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,773
Thanks: 257
Fixes: 20
Registered: 16-02-2009

Re: Canonical CEO admits Unity was a painful change

Yep I can't get on with Mint 12 either, staying on M11 for moment, maybe M13 will be better.
Adobe is shooting itself in the foot here, as more people/devices are using Linux then they will lose out to other tech.
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 10,825
Thanks: 250
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Registered: 01-09-2007

Re: Canonical CEO admits Unity was a painful change

I never put AIR or Acrobat on my PC - I had no problems because I didn't use them.
Open Java works as well as the Sun version ever did.
Mint 12 works well - although the transfer from Ubuntu 11.04 to Mint was a painful one.
It was a choice between Unity in 11.10 and Xubuntu in 11.10 - however since Canonical thought it would be clever
to put a mobile phone user interface in place of Gnome, I decided I really didn't want to stay with such stupid people.
In Mint getting the configuration right (well nearly right) was a real pain - 100% right would have meant editing system XML files!
It's not as good as good as Gnome2, but I've even found myself using some of the accessible Gnome3 aspects.
It even works well enough to run a VM on Mint 12...