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Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

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Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

I have an Italian student staying with me, his laptop has stopped working on Windows Vista at the point just before the Password screen arrives. !  (BSOD)
see this posting here for the background so far
http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,81734.0.html
I have downloaded pclinuxos-phoenix-2009.4.iso and burnt it to CD R.... booted up on his computer and it works.... I have found out how to set up the wireless connection so he is able to browse the Internet from it....
However, I would really like to be able to advise him how to access his files/folders/documents/pictures/videos through the Linux OS, so that he can continue to use the laptop for his studies, until he goes back to Italy, where he says he can get it fixed, from where he bought it... !
Are there any kind souls out there, who know this particular OS and can guide me as to which things to click on, and in what order, to access his stuff....
19 REPLIES
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

I am still waiting for that version to download but in the meantime I have been checking with the earlier version.
From the desktop menu select Utilities
In this there are a number of items.
One is storage media and this shows the hard drives and you can access the files from them.
Another is Remote Places.
Clicking on this followed by Samba Shares will see your local network. I am not sure how it does it but it detected the correct network and I could immediately see all the shared folder on my Windows 7 Computer (note that it worked the same on my daughters network where the relevant computer was running XP)
The network is because I have two PC's connected to the router.
If you want to access the laptop from the other PC you may have to set up sharing
csogilvie
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Jim - I think what he's trying to do is access the documents on the hard drive in the laptop from PCLinuxOS so I'm not sure your steps will help?
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

The first step will allow him to see them.
The next thing is to get them somewhere he can access them.
I would have hoped he could copy them to another computer and work  om them from there
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Hi Guys....
Yes I just want to be able to access and use them on the same computer, (if that is possible)...
I have been into the section Authentication... and there was something there about being able to access the windows files, but it needed a couple of downloads
samba-winbind, nss_ldap, pam_krb5, libsasl2-plug-gssapi    when I clicked on OK at the bottom, it returned that it  "could not install samba-winbind"
also somewhere else,  it needed samba-server and it again reported "could not install ......"
this has got me thinking.....
I am running this from the CD R..... so presumably to be able to access the windows stuff I will have to actually install the Phoenix 2009.4 onto the hdd, and then the downloads will be able to be "installed" into the linux OS...
Am I correct in that assumption?
VileReynard
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Probably not a good idea to install Linux - just yet Cheesy
To access a drive from the CD, you could do some command line stuff. Cheesy
1st create an empty directory [this will have a kind of virtual existence in memory]
mkdir windows

Then mount your C: drive (using the mount command) Cheesy
mount /dev/hda1 windows -t ntfs -r

(Note - use any tool to find out which partition Windows is loaded on - that hda1 might be sda1 etc
The -r option makes it readonly
Then browse that windows directory...
When you are done,
umount windows

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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4


That looks a bit chinese, !   Cheesy  but I will give it a go. and see what happens. !  
Thanks

EDIT....
do I do that with the Linux Phoenix CD running?
VileReynard
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Yes! (Note that I've never used Linux Phoenix)!
But those instructions cannot cause any writes to your hard disk.

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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

if you do want to write to the drive, add -rw to the end of the line where it currently says -r.  that will mount the filesystem read/write.
you may find that if you call up the konqueror file manager and click on the storage icon (on mine a red flag (pclinuxos)) that you can access the filesystem from there.  if you can, right-clicking on a file will allow you to do whatever you want with it, including editing, by choosing appropriately from the drop menu.
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Hi Guys. !
Well, I tried for ages to get something to work, but must be doing it wrong!... I think I must be suffering from Windows Fever,  ! .. I can only vaguely remember doing DOS for a couple of months, and it did not really make sense then!... with such a long time out of it, if it don`t work, .... give up !...
As mentioned, managed to get it set up to surf the net, so he could access some of his college files on line,  He informs me he is going home for Christmas shortly, so is not too worried about getting a fix here.... says he can get the shop to fix it, !...
Thanks very much for your help... When I have some time, I think I may play around with Phoenix, and I also got Slax to have a go with too...
Cheers
Gerry
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Quote from: shutter
Thanks very much for your help... When I have some time, I think I may play around with Phoenix, and I also got Slax to have a go with too...

If you are having problems with PCLinuxOS then Slax will horrify you  Wink
PCLInuxOS and Linux Mint are a lot more user friendly than Slax is (I have been using Linux for nearly 3 years full time and I find Slax hard going. Great if you want to build a completely custom box but not if you just want to use it!)
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

OK biker... thanks for that... I just saw it somewhere and downloaded it, "just in case" ...will ditch the disc... and stick with the Phoenix for now... (which will reside in my laptop bag until I get some inspiration ! ! !) Wink
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Just a quickie (Ohh err Mrs)
All the Linux releases have names, Mint 8 is Helena , PCLinuxOS 9.04 is Phoenix. But if you want more help then stick to the Main distro name rather than the release name.
State inside the message the version but stick to PCLinuxOS rather than Phoenix. (TO me Phoenix is/was a piece of software for the school admin and a mythical bird (also the name of one of my PC's  Embarrassed))
Community Veteran
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

OK Thanks.  Smiley
linux
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Re: Accessing Windows files through Linux Phoenix 2009.4

Quote from: Taxisofevil
Then mount your C: drive (using the mount command) Cheesy
mount /dev/hda1 windows -t ntfs -r

Obviously that will only work if the Linux kernel is configured with the NTFS driver!
To check whether the NTFS driver is configured type this:
cat /proc/filesystems

The output will look something like this:
nodev   sysfs
nodev   rootfs
nodev   bdev
nodev   proc
nodev   tmpfs
nodev   sockfs
nodev   usbfs
nodev   pipefs
nodev   anon_inodefs
nodev   inotifyfs
nodev   devpts
       ext2
nodev   ramfs
       vfat
       iso9660
       jfs

If "ntfs" is missing from the output (as in the case above) then your Linux kernel will require the NTFS driver to be loaded before it can mount the NTFS file system. With luck your Linux CD will already include the NTFS driver as a loadable module. Unless your Linux CD desktop includes a program to load kernel modules, you will need to load the module by hand: make sure you are logged in as "root" and type the following:
modprobe ntfs

If "modprobe" prints an error message then your Linux CD probably does not include the NTFS driver. If that is the case then you are pretty much stuck; you will need to try another Linux CD.
If "modprobe" prints no errors then the NTFS driver will have been loaded. Type "cat /proc/filesystems" again to make sure.
The next issue is to identify the name of the disk partition containing the NTFS file system. Type the following:
cat /proc/partitions

The output will look something like this:
major minor  #blocks  name
  8        0  312571224 sda
  8        1      65535 sda1
  8        2    9437184 sda2
  8        3    9437184 sda3
  8        4  293631320 sda4

The right hand column contains the names of the disk(s) and disk partitions. In the above output, there is one disk called "sda" with four partitions - "sda1", "sda2", "sda3" and "sda4". On your PC you might have more than one disk, and the partitions might be called something like "hda1" (etc) instead of "sda1" (etc). These disk partitions are accessed via the file system under the "/dev" directory, for example "/dev/hda1". In theory one (or more) of these disk partitions will contain your NTFS file system(s).
At this point you should be able to retry the mount command using the identified disk partition names. The following assumes you have a directory called "/mnt" on your Linux CD; if not substitute some other directory (e.g. create a new one called "/tmp/windows").
To mount partition 1 (e.g. "/dev/hda1") as "/mnt" type the following:
mount -t ntfs -r /dev/hda1 /mnt

If "mount" prints an error message, try the next partition:
mount -t ntfs -r /dev/hda2 /mnt

and so on, until either (1) "mount" prints no errors, or (2) you have exhausted all the disk partitions.
If "mount" succeeded then your NTFS file system should be visible at /mnt:
ls /mnt

When you are finished with the NTFS file system you unmount it again with the "umount" command:
umount /mnt

If you want to be able to write to the NTFS file system, repeat the mount command without the "-r" (read-only) option:
mount -t ntfs /dev/hda1 /mnt

I hope all goes well!