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A4 to A5

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,328
Thanks: 77
Fixes: 2
Registered: 30-08-2007

A4 to A5

In MS Word 2007, I wish to print an A4 flyer/poster reduced on to A5 paper for a limited print run, without having the content overlap onto two or three A5 pages, and not lose the original saved A4 settings. I used to know how to do this in an earlier version of Word but can't seem to find the answer in the later version.
I suspect the answer is a) simple and b) staring me in the face but I can't see it.
As an aside I would like to save the A5 version under a different name for future use.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
1 REPLY
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,328
Thanks: 77
Fixes: 2
Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: A4 to A5

My thanks to those who viewed this thread, I've found the answer:
Word (2007) does not easily convert A4 to A5 scaled to fit A5, some printers will do this (my Canon doesn't) What Word will do is to arrange two A5 copies landscape view to an A4 page, however these then need to be cut to form two pages or one half of the page will be left blank depending how you set it up. Word does not necessarily convert the margins and position accurately, meaning when the A4 page is cut in half the "image" is not centred left to right or top to bottom. When trimmed central the A5 page is too small if being framed or laminated. That's if you want the resulting page to look "right"
The answer is to convert the A4 page to .pdf from there the print can be converted to A5 scaled to fit the page. A process that takes longer to write than it does to do.
I still maintain though that in a much earlier version of Word I could do this without .pdf. or I had a different printer that would it.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.