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what a difference 24 makes

whistler
Grafter
Posts: 143
Registered: 30-12-2009

what a difference 24 makes

For the first time I've come close (according to you) to my 10GB limit and whilst checking out a few things I came accross this cuty on your usage page:
Quote
How we measure data:
1000 Kilobytes = 1MB (Megabyte), 1000 MB = 1 GB (Gigabyte)

Presumably you've also unilaterally decided that 1000 bytes = 1 Kilobyte
So your 10GB limit is actually nearer 9.25 GB -  Shocked
tsk tsk
11 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,106
Registered: 06-02-2008

Re: what a difference 24 makes

This is a historical argument and one that is in line with the industry such as hard drive manufacturers.
To get technical, a gigabyte is 10^9 (1000 x 1000 x 1000) and the symbol is GB whereas a gibibyte (pronounced jibbybyte) is 2^30 (1024 x 1024 x 1024) and the symbol is GiB.
As such, our nomenclature on the page you reference is correct. GiB is virtually never used when referring to powers of 2 / 1024 and GB is incorrectly substituted in it's place.
Edited for clarity
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,472
Thanks: 292
Fixes: 4
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: what a difference 24 makes

There are other thing to consider, such as -
Is the amount of data used for accounting purposes referring to the number of bytes of useful data transferred, or whether it includes the additional traffic overhead representing the total number of bytes sent over ADSL ?
For a perfect 8Mb/s ADSL line the overhead would be 8128Kb/s transferred, but the maximum data you would actually receive would be 7150Kb/s.
Another thing to think about is ADSL packet loss and retries.  If you have an imperfect ADSL connection then you would be getting all manner of dropped packets, and retransmissions.
Therefore the true amount of ADSL data may be a lot higher than the file size that was downloaded.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,699
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: what a difference 24 makes

As I understand it, the GiB answer is relatively recent.  Computers have always measured data as a power of 2 because of the binary aspect of digital computing.  Over the last couple of years, I've managed to come to an acceptance that the terminology has changed, although there is still confusion since Windows continues to use the old definitions in its calculations of disk and memory sizes.
In the same way, I've come to accept that in computing, disc is spelled disk, and a billion is one thousand million, not (as it historically was) one million million.
Pesky Americans, devalue everything.  Wink
John
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: what a difference 24 makes

jibbybyte?  who dreamed that up?  i've gone from bits to bytes to megabytes to gigabytes to terabytes.  along the way i've yet to meet this strange creature the jibbybyte, though i might adopt it as a username somewhere.
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,106
Registered: 06-02-2008

Re: what a difference 24 makes

Gibibyte Smiley
There's a whole family...
Kibibyte (KiB) 2^10
Mebibyte (MiB) 2^20
Gibibyte (GiB) 2^30
Tebibyte (TiB) 2^40
Pebibyte (PiB) 2^50
Exbibyte (EiB) 2^60
Zebibyte (ZiB) 2^70
Yobibyte (YiB) 2^80
I wonder what the equivalent of a Googol is... Goobibyte? I do hope so...
MarkB
Grafter
Posts: 29
Registered: 01-08-2010

Re: what a difference 24 makes

OOoo that's a sneaky thing for the industry to do. It would some sectors of the industry use this new fangled SI definations others still use the binary. To me, and I'm a suspicious git at the best of times, the idea of changing the accepted meaning of the terms GB etc, smacks of saving cash in production etc - I'd like to be wrong on that but since the world revolves around industry making cash.. well that's the cynical in me.
magnetism2772
Grafter
Posts: 983
Registered: 06-06-2010

Re: what a difference 24 makes

the difference seems to be how windows(?) interprets size
so if your using a windows computer the GiB as recommended by the
(CEI) is an 'incomplete' size
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,111
Thanks: 1
Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: what a difference 24 makes

Quote from: MarkB
the idea of changing the accepted meaning of the terms GB etc, smacks of saving cash in production etc

To be fair, kilo-, mega-, giga- etc. have traditionally meant 103/6/9 in science (which is ultimately the root of all units and prefixes really); they are the official SI prefixes. So it's more a case that early computer usage went against the accepted definitions of those terms.
Luzern
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 3,117
Thanks: 288
Fixes: 2
Registered: 31-07-2007

Re: what a difference 24 makes

For Rock Computers they're all translated in to Yabbadabbadoobytes.
No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
MarkB
Grafter
Posts: 29
Registered: 01-08-2010

Re: what a difference 24 makes

Aye, at the end of the day it doesn't really matter what they are called as long as the meaning or value behind the word is transparent enough for everyone to understand. The thing is for ages the 'common definition' of GB ( instead of GiB ) worked fine for everyone including hardware folks, then something happened somewhere and it changed. Was it in 2007 that Samsung? admitted some sort of wrong doing in a class action and offered to pay customers or give them free software because of this misunderstanding. Other HHD manufacturers denied anything wrong, but also offered customers similar software deals I think - although my memory ( 1024 in all accepted terms lol ) might be wrong there. Ho Hum.

Yabbadabbadoobytes indeed.. Smiley
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,106
Registered: 06-02-2008

Re: what a difference 24 makes

In the early days there wasn't so great a % difference between the two, but as we increase the orders of magnitude the difference is compounded
k 98%
M 95%
G 93%
T 91%