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the considering garderner

magnetism2772
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the considering garderner

fascinated by the things? - can you identify the image in this picture ?Huh
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magnetism2772
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Registered: 06-06-2010

Re: the considering garderner

it may help to give you a better angle
magnetism2772
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Re: the considering garderner

this  may or may not help ?
magnetism2772
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Re: the considering garderner

its gone into a ball now , in the rain  looking at  it  it doesn't like water
whispers what is it ? is it bewildering and have you ever seen anything like it before ?
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: the considering garderner

i think it's called a 'teasle'.  it's the flowering top of a long stalky plant that stands about three to four feet tall.  i recall them growing on hedgerows in the countryside, when we had one.
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Re: the considering garderner

Quote from: artificer
i think it's called a 'teasle'.

Why does that make me think of a wool making process Undecided
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nadger
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Re: the considering garderner

Regrettably all my wife's family that worked in the mills round Leeds have passed on so can't ask them.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dipsacus
MrC
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Re: the considering garderner

Got to admit it doesn't look like any of the teasels we get around here (Dorset). They all look like http://www.cvni.org/wildflowernursery/wildflowers/images/22.jpg (after flowering).
magnetism2772
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Re: the considering garderner

thanks all
all your teasle  images certainly look very similar to mine
twins i'd say but i'm not a botanist 
strat mentions wool ,  and  it does look like a piece of fiber taken from a brown harris tweed coat ,  and viewed under a microscope
but
its actually a modern sculpture and its called rusty nails
the valuation of rusty nails is  £25.00.
From sitting in the garden with my friends granite and gravel I got too thinking
that its true that with a little ingenuity one can make money  from having nothing  Cool

Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: the considering garderner

the pix look very similar to what i remember.
strat, wool is 'teasled' to separate the strands prior to spinning.  some methods 'card' the wool with two spike boards used in opposition.
pierre_pierre
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Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: the considering garderner

living in a wool treating area, you have fuller mills and teasle carding, and also tenter hooks, all ways of conditioning the wool before and after weaving
have a nice pub near me in Fuller Street http://www.thesquareandcompasses.co.uk/
Tentering is where the woven wool is stretched between frame on hooks, and is the origin of the expression to be on tenter hooks
Googled this from wikipedia after I wrote the above
Quote
Tenterhooks were used as far back as the fourteenth century in the process of making woollen cloth. After the cloth was woven it still contained oil from the fleece and some dirt. A fuller (also called a tucker or walker) cleaned the woollen cloth in a fulling mill, and then had to dry it carefully or the wool would shrink. To prevent this shrinkage, the fuller would place the wet cloth on a large wooden frame, a "tenter", and leave it to dry outside. The lengths of wet cloth were stretched on the tenter (from the Latin "tendere", to stretch) using hooks (nails driven through the wood) all around the perimeter of the frame to which the cloth's edges (selvedges) were fixed so that as it dried the cloth would retain its shape and size.[1] At one time it would have been common in manufacturing areas to see tenter-fields full of these frames.
By the mid-eighteenth century the phrase "on tenterhooks" came into use to mean being in a state of uneasiness, anxiety, or suspense, stretched like the cloth on the tenter.

p.s.  Goodness know where the nutter gets his pictures, it might have been a hedgehog or porcupine but definitely wasnt, it might have been a teasle but definitely wasnt, all garden friendly,  ? a friendly but of garden, no just a bit of rusty junk?
try googling for the real meaning of the thread title
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magnetism2772
Grafter
Posts: 983
Registered: 06-06-2010

Re: the considering garderner

strange we've ended up talking about wool
as the first working computer was the mechanical weaving loom
it was the first computer perforated paper tape controlled machine made around 1720 something
you can see the idea if you visit antique auctions as i do
they have the same workings inside musical organs like a piano  roll etc
where paper was joined to form a endless loop , ie like a chain on a bike going round and round 

they have one or two bouchon machines left in  Manchester
pierre_pierre
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Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: the considering garderner

I dont have to go that far, My town have the Warner Collection in an old Mill building, and one weaver - Richard Humphries used hand looms until recently http://www.humphriesweaving.co.uk/history.html and indeed remade the fabrics after the Hampton Court fire
The Jacquard loom was the first to use punched card http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacquard_loom and is no where as old as the above expert reckons, Humphries used Jacquard within i/2 mile of where I live
The Bouchon machine was now automatic, it required another person the align the holes, but it did away with errors, the Jacquard did not need another operator
magnetism2772
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Posts: 983
Registered: 06-06-2010

Re: the considering garderner

I like the Humphries Weaving Factory
Nice to see  these  'wooden' machines  about ,  outside of museums , and still being used
Jacquard looms they are the fully computerized  machines i was talking about
staying on wool and the victorian era
90 % of the harris tweed in the shops  today  is manufactured  on their own old 19th century harris tweed hand looms  ,
i think  the tweed name originates from their  woolen mills being on the river tweed in scotland
i'm not sure on that at the moment
pierre_pierre
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Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: the considering garderner

this picture was taken in the Braintrree New Mill, before moving it to Sudbury, the New Mill now holds the Warner Archive
The box on top of the loome is the Jacquard mechanism and the punch cards can just be seem