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sandwiches

TTman
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Registered: ‎26-01-2019

sandwiches

Why is today that when you buy a sandwich from a shop (preprepared) they all have mayo in them and end up soggy and you are unable to taste the contents only the MAYOAngry

 

Just reminiscing when I started work we went to a local bakery shop for sandwiches, Ther was a choice of ham,beef,cheese or potted meat. A ham sandwich  in a bap was 10d (old money) and bought two. If two people wanted ham we then bought a ham sandwich in a large breadcake ( about 12" accross) for 1/10d. The ham was hand carved from a leg of ham and if it was the end of the joint the the ham was in chunks half inch thick.Ah those were the daysThumbs UpThumbs Up

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TTman
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Re: sandwiches

Just an extra thought.....In  later jobs it was haddock and chips (were posh in yorshur) on friday and to the butchers on tuesday for still warm pork pies and even later job to the pub for drink and muck fat sandwiches and for breakfast bacon sarnies from the local greasy spoon....how did I make 71years i dont know?Laugh

Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎06-11-2007

Re: sandwiches


@TTman wrote:

Why is today that when you buy a sandwich from a shop (preprepared) they all have mayo in them and end up soggy and you are unable to taste the contents only the MAYOAngry

 



The reason is, that, whatever is inside, you will not be able to taste, if it is 100% fresh or 60% fresh, or even less Shocked and because you are biting into it, it "feels" fresh, and soft,  and nice... even if you don`t like the taste of mayo that much.

 

I am 100% hater of mayo, and it is very rare to find a simple cheese sarnie that has not got mayo in it... ( Tesco`s used to do them occasionally though)...  maybe they sold out quicker and it "appeared to be"  only occasionally ! ! !

Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: sandwiches

They put Mayo in because the other things in  sandwiches are tasteless.

Much of the food we eat today is tasteless and if it tastes of anything it's due to all the artificial stuff that is added.

I guess you got to 71 because you ignored all these food fads where something is good for you one day and the next day it will kill you if you eat it.

The only solution is to find a local family bakers who make all their own stuff, fortunately we have a couple in this area but supermarket stuff or anything prepacked....they can keep it.

Baldrick1
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Re: sandwiches

I will always remember buying a sandwich from a place advertising 'freshly made sandwiches'. I watched it being made so I knew it was freshly made.

Trying to eat said food brought home to me the difference between 'Freshly made' and 'Freshly made with fresh ingredients'!

Minivanman
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Re: sandwiches

Mayo certainly seems to be the filling of choice to add to whatever else is put into these sandwiches for the hungry in a hurry. Made in the main by low paid immigrant labour on semi automated production lines and allowed to be proclaimed as 'fresh' for up to three days. 

Cheese and pickle if I must, but that's about it as I cannot stand the thought of fat, gristle or skin being sneaked into a sarnie by some bored worker drone or blind robot. I can remember when they first appeared plastic wrapped in those early God forsaken motorway cafes of the sixties such as the Blue Boar at Watford, but how and why in heaven's name we finished up buying them in places like Tesco I'll never know and as for such a wide choice of fillings, what's all that about.

It's about being stuck behind some undecided front of cabinet 'spoilt for choice' sandwich shopper, that's what. 

"Chip sarnie when we get back home my love?"

"Yeh, go on then pet, otherwise we'll be here all day" Smiley

Anonymous
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Re: sandwiches


@TTman wrote:

Why is today that when you buy a sandwich from a shop (preprepared) they all have mayo in them and end up soggy


 

At home, we always put lettuce next to the bread, top & bottom, to isolated Mayo/Salad Cream from the bread.

Jonpe
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Re: sandwiches

Do they really put mayo on cheese sandwiches?  The two don't go together at all.

Where I work our sandwiches are brought in by an Asian firm, and we get some rather un-British combinations such as chicken and mint sauce.  My main problem with all their sandwiches is the excessive salt content.

ffox
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Re: sandwiches

I now realise I'm a cheapskate.  In The Times today a report by Lucy Holden tells us:

"Crustless sandwiches. They were all you ever wanted as a child and now, thanks to the hottest new restaurant trend, they are something you can pay to enjoy as an adult. They aren’t just any old crustless sarnies, though. The katsu sando — named after the Japanese slang for sandwich — has been a phenomenon in Japan for decades and has become the coolest thing since sliced bread in the UK, with Michelin-starred restaurants and hipster hangouts inventing a version for a rapidly growing following.

 The swanky Dinings SW3 in London has for those in the know an “off menu” sando that’s made of Joshu wagyu, a type of beef raised on highlands with the purest water and vegetation, served with a miso glaze on a special nutty bread. Its price? A mere £100."

Just the thing for a quick lunchtime snack!

 

Minivanman
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Re: sandwiches

Do they do takeaway, only I think they should all be taken away and locked up!  Cheesy

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Re: sandwiches


@TTman wrote:

A ham sandwich  in a bap was 10d (old money) ...


I remember when I used to go to choir practice on the way back the bus stop was right outside a bakery. I used to get 2 crispy rolls with butter for 6d!

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TTman
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Re: sandwiches

Today I have taken my wife into Otley and she bought for my lunch a ham sandwich from a renown butcher there. Breadcake and thick handcut ham half an inch thick.....Pure heaven!!!!!!Thumbs UpSmileyThumbs UpThumbs Up

Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎05-04-2007

Re: sandwiches

I'm guessing the OP doesn't like Mayo then Tongue

Pre-decimal currency was a bit before my time. Though I do remember being at a corner shop near my parents once and they were a bit amazed at the £1 coin. Was too young to understand why but now I realised they had just been released, probably the first one they had which had replaced the notes.

Back on topic (sorry), is there not a sandwich shop you can stress "No Mayo" when you order?

I'm pretty boring and just eat something like Ham and Cheese or Chicken. When I go into Central London, which I will tomorrow to meet some friends, I usually go to Pret - Ham and Mustard, or EAT. I'll have anything without green stuff in it.

So you can guess I am not a fan of that Smiley

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Jonpe
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Re: sandwiches

You hear it in American TV programmes/films, "Hold the mayo!"

The introduction of the £1 coin had nothing to do with the introduction of decimal currency; with inflation having peaked at 26.9% in 1975 pound notes were handled a lot more and wore out very quickly.  The pound coin was introduced in 1983 and was sometimes referred to as a Maggie since it was hard, brassy and thought it was a sovereign.

Community Veteran
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Re: sandwiches

Ah yep @Jonpe 

1983 - I must have been around 6 at the time.

I know it had nothing to do with decimal currency, also I remember half pennies and being in the supermarket when things were priced by half a p.

Also I remember before the barcode scanning we have now, the checkout people at my local Tesco's had to look at the price sticker and put the price in manually. Smiley