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"Resemble"

James
Grafter
Posts: 21,036
Registered: 04-04-2007

"Resemble"

Right.  Bit of an internal argument/discussion Smiley
I am convinced that resemble has two meanings.
1 - To look like something, to bear resemblance to, to be similar.
2 - A term of resentment: "I resemble that remark".
Whilst I'm absolutely positive the first is correct (and pretty much every dictionary I can find agrees with me), I was pretty certain that the second was also. I've heard the saying "I resemble that remark" a number of times and always thought, why didn't you say "resent" instead and I'm certain I looked it up at the time and it made sense, but now I'm probably going mad.
So I was thinking. Resembling a remark could be deemed as a term of resentment.  If someone says something about you whch is somewhat derogatory, yet it does have some truth, you could indignantly state that you resemble the remark based on it containing some truth, but does not paint the entire picture.
I think I'm going insane.
14 REPLIES
Plusnet Alumni (retired) orbrey
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
Posts: 10,540
Registered: 18-07-2007

Re: "Resemble"

I've never heard of the second meaning. Is this a word of the day or something?
What's really sad is I'm sat next to you and could just ask... but this is more fun. Wow, that's even worse.
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: 08-06-2007

Re: "Resemble"

Quote from: orbrey
I've never heard of the second meaning. Is this a word of the day or something?
What's really sad is I'm sat next to you and could just ask... but this is more fun. Wow, that's even worse.

Down here, amongst the potatoes and the cows, we use "I resemble that remark" as a tongue-in-cheek version of "I resent that remark", but meaning the opposite - i.e. whatever was just said is actually very accurate.
P'raps it's just a somerset thing.  I mean, you guys dont think that "Where's it to?" is proper English, and you would have no idea what 'daps' were!
B.
Plusnet Help Team
Plusnet Help Team
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Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: "Resemble"

Quote
we use "I resemble that remark" as a tongue-in-cheek version of "I resent that remark", but meaning the opposite

Yup, that's what I thought it meant too.
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 Chris Parr
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Plusnet Alumni (retired) orbrey
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
Posts: 10,540
Registered: 18-07-2007

Re: "Resemble"

Quote
P'raps it's just a somerset thing.  I mean, you guys dont think that "Where's it to?" is proper English, and you would have no idea what 'daps' were!

Yeah? Walked down any gennels lately?
[me=orbrey]considers opening the breadcake/teacake/bap debate[/me]
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
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Re: "Resemble"

Quote from: orbrey
Yeah? Walked down any gennels lately?

According to the OED:-
2. dial. A long narrow passage between houses, either roofed or unroofed.
1669 Manch. Ct. Leet Rec. (1887) V. 98 Wm Jackson hath made a Doore into A Ginnell belongeinge to Edmo Heywood.
a1804 J. MATHER Songs (1862) 33 in Sheffield Gloss. s.v., When Sancho was a raw-boned whelp And lived in yonder jennel.
1855 WAUGH Lanc. Life (1857) 111 Through th' ginnel, an' up th' steps.

Plusnet Alumni (retired) orbrey
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
Posts: 10,540
Registered: 18-07-2007

Re: "Resemble"

Nice, it's in the OED. I just wanted to respond to a local colloquialism with another local colloquialism.
Quote
2. dial. A long narrow passage between houses, either roofed or unroofed.

Yep, that's what I've always understood it to be. Sadly dictionary.com does not help me find a definition of daps (though it says dapping is essentially something skipping lightly across the surface of water).
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
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Re: "Resemble"

Although, there is a second meaning of "Dap" ...
DAP - colloq. and dial.
    pl. Rubber-soled shoes; spec.    (a) slippers;    (b) plimsolls

Plusnet Alumni (retired) orbrey
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
Posts: 10,540
Registered: 18-07-2007

Re: "Resemble"

Thank you. That makes sense.
I was amused to find that in Australia trainers are called runners, and flip-flops are called thongs. This made for some amusing moments.
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: 08-06-2007

Re: "Resemble"

Yup, 'daps' are those annoying little black sports shoes that we wore at primary school.  Often called pumps or plimsolls/plimsoles in other weird parts of the country.
Thus the naming of the 'dap bag' which was that drawstring bag you carried your... er... daps in.
B.
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Re: "Resemble"

FWIW, I agree with Barry and Chris about 'I resemble that remark' too.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: "Resemble"

So daps are mutton dummies!  Grin
John
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: 08-06-2007

Re: "Resemble"

DAPS:

From the venerable Wikipedia:
In the UK these shoes were compulsory in schools' physical education lessons and today are still known as Plimsolls, except in Northern Ireland and western Scotland where they are usually known as gutties and parts of Southern England and Wales, where they are known as daps (taken from the factory sign - "Dunlop Athletic Plimsoles" locally called "the DAP factory") or dappers. They are also known as pumps. In South Africa they are called tekkies.
Plusnet Help Team
Plusnet Help Team
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Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: "Resemble"

I was tempted to actually buy a pair of these a few weeks ago from an 80's novelty shop. Thankfully common sense prevailed and I went and had a beer instead.
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 Chris Parr
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jazz
Grafter
Posts: 240
Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: "Resemble"

You were a bit posh having a dedicated drawstring bag to carry your pumps in when you went to school.  At our primary school (in the very early 1950s) the pumps were provided by the County Council in large metal cages and were delivered to your school on the day you had PT (this was the days before PE).  You selected a pair that fitted and got on with it.  You were supposed to tie the laces together when you put them back so that the "pair" would stay together.  It was always a problem if you got a non-matching pair. Undecided