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Wild burial of ashes

Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-09-2008

Wild burial of ashes

A few years ago, in the grass, at the side of a public footpath, overnight, a memorial stone appeared, made of polished marble with gold inlay surname and initials, it measures about  12" by 12", with about 3" above the surface is cemented in place and has one of those little pots for flowers, it does no harm apart from becoming a 'pee' spot  for dogs, the flowers seem to be changed regularly, although nobody has seen anyone attending the stone.
I'd guess that from the amount of soil that had been removed an 'urn' rest under the stone.
I mentioned this to one of the footpath wardens, he said it just appeared one night. Permission had not been asked, as there had been several comments/complaints. he was wondering what to do about it.
Because of the delicate nature he was initially going to 'take no action'.
Over the Christmas period a second stone appeared, slightly larger, same surname, laid at a 'wonky angle' - the site now looks a bit tacky, judging from the amount of soil spread around, I'd guess a second 'urn' has been interred.  Wouldn't be so bad if it was a scenic spot.
Anyone else seen evidence of 'wild burials'.
6 REPLIES
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Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: Wild burial of ashes

I did a quick Google on wild burials and found several sites who all state similar things[quote=http://woodlandburialplace.co.uk/regulations.htm]Regulations
The aim of Penwith Woodland Burial Place,
is to develop a natural woodland for postperity,
THEREFORE WE REQUEST:
   No shrubs to be planted
   No artificial flowers
   No other items to be left on graves
   All containers for fresh flowers to be approved (for health and safety reasons)
However, we do encourage the planting of bulbs or primroses,
we are also happy to have graves marked with a small slate headstone (available from, or approved by ourselves)
[quote=http://www.countryside-burials.co.uk/brinkley.htm]A commemorative tree may be purchased through the Estate and will be planted at the appropriate time of year from a selection which will include Ash, Oak, Lime, Beech, Larch, Wild Cherry and Hazel. The graves themselves may be sown with wild flower seed. Apart from a small flat stone set into the grave, this is the only form of memorial permitted in the Burial Ground.
Apparently it's becoming more common.
Edit: Can't say I've ever come across one.

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Registered: 21-03-2011

Re: Wild burial of ashes

Provided you have permission of the land owner and in a location more than 50 metres from a watercourse you can bury up to two bodies on private land. It goes without saying the burial has to be properly documented and a valid death certificate for each body. Any more bodies and you have to seek "change of use" planning approval.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
randpwar
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Wild burial of ashes

We very sadly lost our neighbour last April whose wish was to be cremated without a service and then her ashes to be buried in a natural burial ground in Tysoe, Warwickshire, a short drive from home. Just before Christmas we attended a tree planting ceremony in her name and found the place to be extremely peaceful; far more so and much less corporate (for the lack of a better description) than any church graveyard where I’ve attended ceremonies
It is set out as a natural meadow where only indigenous wild plants are allowed to grow (indigenous is classed as any plant here from the end of the last ice age ie when we became separated by sea water). Another area is being set out as a wooded area with again the same stipulation. I’m told it looks beautiful in spring and plan to spend a day working there at that time with my surviving neighbour, Mike.
One of the organisers told me that there is a finite amount of plots the payment for which is put into a trust fund balanced to allow an income for upkeep in perpetuity. They prefer natural burials, as opposed to ashes internments, as they are not harmful in any way to the environment
It is such a lovely, beautiful and peaceful place that it has challenged completely any non-conscious thoughts SWMBO and I may have previously held about where we would be laid to rest
http://sunrisingburialground.co.uk/ ;

 
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Wild burial of ashes

I Recall reading an article several years ago expressing concern about the number of  burial urns being left in various parts of the lake district, I can understand that people's ashes should be left in various locations but not physical items like urns.
Our own wishes are for  a natural burial ground following a humanist service.
Community Veteran
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Re: Wild burial of ashes

Quote from: journeys
at the side of a public footpath
A public footpath is just a "right of way" over someones land.
It will presumably depend who owns the land, if this is correct:
Quote from: AlaricAdair
Provided you have permission of the land owner and in a location more than 50 metres from a watercourse you can bury up to two bodies on private land.
cyrilclark1
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Re: Wild burial of ashes

I saw this notice recently when visiting Kruger National Park, South Africa.
'Take nothing but memories - leave nothing but footprints.'