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Why do Manuals have -

Community Veteran
Posts: 6,584
Thanks: 206
Fixes: 14
Registered: 16-02-2009

Why do Manuals have -

A page with nothing on it but:-
"This page left intentionally blank"
When it isn't because it has this on it ?  Tongue Roll eyes  Crazy
7 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 38,244
Thanks: 933
Fixes: 54
Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: Why do Manuals have -

For the same reason our technical specifications had it.
When it could be a document which could be used in a legal case then it is essential that every page is numbered and the fact that it is deliberately blank (as opposed to the content removed) is clearly stated.
In many cases a technical document would be amended and as part of that a page would be no longer required. Renumbering the whole document would have meant that every page would have to be verified (and in some cases signed by the customer and the contractor) but just replacing one or two pages - one of which could say that it was intentionally left blank - meant that they were the only pages which required verification.
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: 08-06-2007

Re: Why do Manuals have -

Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: Why do Manuals have -

they come in handy for jotting notes on.
Community Veteran
Posts: 4,729
Registered: 04-04-2007

Re: Why do Manuals have -

I use them to ensure correct duplex printing.
magnetism2772
Grafter
Posts: 983
Registered: 06-06-2010

Re: Why do Manuals have -

I always thought the blank page was there to divide  chapter 1
from the inside of the cover page  Huh
its also used for folk to add  any  personal message
its also the place for autograph signings
or 'authorgraph'  signings
feroluce
Grafter
Posts: 26
Registered: 20-08-2010

Re: Why do Manuals have -

It's a typesetting legacy as explained above and in the wiki article.
The main reason it's still around in the digital publishing age is Framemaker.
Adobe Pagemaker was Framemakers main competition. Adobe bought framemaker the product, but not the company.
Some of the more cynical amongst us might think their intention was to kill the competition, but competition law meant they had to keep it alive.
But, because they didn't keep any of the people who built it, they had no idea (or no intention) of keeping it up to date.
All of the changes to Framemaker since Adobe bought are purely cosmetic.
When they bought Framemaker, adding or removing a page from a document caused no end of problems (never mind a blank page, I've seen some pages with a single sentence on them).
The industry-wide solution at the time was to stick in a blank page.
They had no way of updating Framemaker, so we still saw blank pages in documents.
Today it's just habit by authors, or systems that aren't particularly well engineered with regards to SGML.
What Adobe didn't forsee is quite a lot of Tech Authors sticking with Framemaker to this day.
I'm an InDesign man myself (an elegant amalgamation, then evolution of Framemaker and Pagemaker), Framemaker is just too much work.
I love the ability to rip out or shove in pages at will, and have the document automatically rearrange it table of contents, complete with hyperlinks.

I went a little too techy there, didn't I?!
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 10,580
Thanks: 191
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Registered: 01-09-2007

Re: Why do Manuals have -

It's a proof that there is no such thing as existentialism.
Also
Quote
Metaphysical nihilism is the philosophical theory that there might be no objects at all, i.e. that there is a possible world in which there are no objects at all; or at least that there might be no concrete objects at all, so even if every possible world contains some objects, there is at least one that contains only abstract objects.