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Whatever happend to...

Aspiring Legend
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Whatever happend to...

Whatever happened to those anti-static strips we used to fit on our cars to stop the kids throwing up in the back?

Mine did by the way, so Halfords still owe me £1.50. 


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Re: Whatever happend to...

people realised they were pointless & useless and stopped buying them I suspect.
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Aspiring Legend
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Re: Whatever happend to...

Well yes, which is why I want my £1.50 back. Smiley


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Re: Whatever happend to...

take them to small claims for false advertising Grin
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Re: Whatever happend to...

Static electricity is a problem with vehicles and don't let anyone tell you it isn't - despite wearing pretty much 100% cotton clothes I regularly get shocks when exiting cars if i forget to touch the metal of the door while still seated to equalise the charge between my body and the car bodywork.  A work colleague told me a tale of when he was on national service in RAF and he was driving a fuel tanker following another tanker to the storage tank to discharge aviation fuel,  he watched as the tanker in front pulled up at the tank and did not hook up the cable from tanker to earth point on tank,  he said he was already in reverse when the driver in front placed the nozzle in the tank and a massive fireball erupted, killing the driver. 

 

Static also a massive problem with modern electronics, which is why pretty much everything is shipped in those dark coloured  anti-static pouches made out of conductive plastic film.

 

Those earth straps did no harm and 'potentially' some good and were cheap enough.

 

Interesting thing about aircraft and lightning strikes ( lightning is static on steroids) with a metal aircraft the body acts as a faraday cage and protects the people and electronics inside ( safest place in a lightning storm is inside a metal car, even better if it has a static strap fitted LOL ),  but with new carbon fibre and other insulating composites the lightning can damage the aircraft ( it causes voids and cracks inside the material that may not be visible ) - they have had to incorporate metal fibres ( lightning conductors ) into the materials to dissipate the energy safely and stop it causing damage.

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Re: Whatever happend to...

Anti Static pouches? Tell me about it.

I introduced (without ever getting any credit for it) anti-static procedures into a company I once worked for. All hunky-dory, except noboby would wear the wrist straps provided and I would watch in amazement as engineers took out new motherboards from those newly introduced static pouches thus breaking the link in the chain!

Great idea, until somebody ignores it.   


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Re: Whatever happend to...

I was once on an aircraft that was struck by lightning; we'd just come off the Lambourne stack and lines up with one of the 27-runways when there was a loud bang, the lights went out, and the illuminated arrows on the floor came on.  It was all very brief and the cabin manager immediately explained what had happened and reassured us that it happened from time to time and aircraft were designed to withstand it.  Quite a few people started screaming, and I thought, "What's the point of screaming, no-one's going to come up and help us?"

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Re: Whatever happend to...


@wotsup wrote:

Static electricity is a problem with vehicles and don't let anyone tell you it isn't - despite wearing pretty much 100% cotton clothes I regularly get shocks when exiting cars if i forget to touch the metal of the door while still seated to equalise the charge between my body and the car bodywork.

I've had shocks when exiting my car and closing the door, some times but not always.

I've given up on trying to work out why sometimes and not others.

Clothing, air temperature and humidity etc?

 

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Re: Whatever happend to...

@Strat 

And yet others myself included have never experienced static shock from a vehicle but as you say, clothes, temperature and humidity etc.

In my early television repairman days and I'm now half ashamed to admit this, if there was a cat or dog in the house I would run the back of my hand across the front of the television screen as I turned it on in order to acquire a static charge - and then just lightly touch their inquisitive pet on it's damp nose.

Seemed like fun at the time, and payback for all those damp patches I had knelt in behind the television set as I was taking the back off. 

Always paid to discharge any static from the tube when they were replaced as well - even a new one straight out of the box could give you a sharp shock if you were not careful. Something to do with it acting like a large capacitor I seem to recall.


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Re: Whatever happend to...


@Strat wrote:

I've had shocks when exiting my car and closing the door, some times but not always.

I've given up on trying to work out why sometimes and not others.

Clothing, air temperature and humidity etc?

 


I used to get shocks pretty much every time when getting out of one particular works van I used to drive, that is until I worked out that if I could jump down without holding the door I'd be okay. I can't remember what happened when I closed the door after exiting and standing on the ground, but ISTR closing it with a foot or elbow just in case.

The shocks were nothing serious though, just a minor annoyance.

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Re: Whatever happend to...

I wear pretty much high cotton clothing ( which is not supposed to generate static ) and leather shoes. From what I have tried if I always touch metal of door before exiting ( having to touch interior door handle does not seem to work ) you equalise the charge with bodywork and won't get a shock, but don't get shocks every time so I get out of the habit.  Maybe air conditioning dries the interior of car out too much, as dry air is worse for static as any moisture in the air will not allow static to build up ( but then again you don't get much damper than a cloud and they make lightning ). 

 

Used to live in Johannesburg which did not get an rain at all from May through to September and you got shocks off everything, including door handles, taps and of course your car...

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Re: Whatever happend to...

Whilstsome of these posts are not electfifying they are certainly shocking.

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Re: Whatever happend to...

Where I'm based, the reach forklift truck drivers keep getting static shocks when they get of the forklifts - its footwear related.

They have taking to wrapping tape / shrinkwrap around the cab door release handle to insulate themselves, we remove this before sending the truck back out.

Us technicians dont get any static shocks from the reach trucks as the footwear we use supplied by our employer is different spec to the stuff issued by the customer to its employees.

Static straps are fitted as standard to the wire guided Very Narrow Aisle forklifts to protect the wire guidance equipment from static interference.
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Re: Whatever happend to...

I'm in blue..


@wotsup wrote:

Static electricity is a problem with vehicles and don't let anyone tell you it isn't - despite wearing pretty much 100% cotton clothes I regularly get shocks when exiting cars if i forget to touch the metal of the door while still seated to equalise the charge between my body and the car bodywork.

Never once have I had a shock and i frequently wear nylon / poly trousers which are attractive to loose electrons and do build a static charge easily. Also I didn't think car paint and lacquer was conductive so how touching it discharges from you is odd.

Static also a massive problem with modern electronics, which is why pretty much everything is shipped in those dark coloured  anti-static pouches made out of conductive plastic film.

I believe they're actually shielded. If they were conductive, anyone wearing clothes covered in static would actually end up having it conducted away from them through the bag into the device. Clearly not the best thing to have happen. Anti static precautions are supposed to drain it away from the person and device at risk though to be honest, even when rubbing an anti static wristband all over my trousers (covered in static) the static doesn't seem to discharge and instead remains all over my trousers. Rather pointless in that aspect..

 

Those earth straps did no harm and 'potentially' some good and were cheap enough.

Yet they do just that - provide a path to ground. While that may well be good for static, it's not so good for a lightening bolt as instead of being unable to conduct and having tyres protect the vehicle from providing a direct path to the ground the strap instead provides that route thus permitting a huge current through the vehicle. I suspect with the ever more sensitive electronics onboard these days that may well be why manufacturers have stopped fitting them. One lightning bolt and the car is dead.


 

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Re: Whatever happend to...

You can get work footwear with antistatic soles,  the material has carbon black or similar in it which conducts electricity and allows static to leak away.

 

@7up tthe anti static bags act as  a faraday cage and to do that the material has to conduct electricity and also not produce its own charge when it rubs on other things, all the things that build up static charges are non-conductors and static is worse in dryer conditions where here is no moisture to naturally conduct it away.

 

Car tyres conduct electricity far better than those straps did, as most of them didn't touch the road anyway, the thing that protects car passengers is the metal body of car forming a faraday cage that routes the electricity around them and down to earth through the tyres.  Aircraft have carbon or metal fibres trailing from rear of wings to allow static to discharge easier as it focuses the charge into smaller area and it drains away quicker.