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To repair... or not repair.

Minivanman
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To repair... or not repair.

To repair or not repair, that is the question.

Trying to source a genuine (not Ebay) part for our ten year old Rangemaster cooker but with little success so far, I decided to contact the manufacturer direct by email and three days later, received a reply telling me that because of the it's 'age' parts were now difficult to get.

Really?

Since when did stuff become obsolete after such a short time, and since when did parts not wear out or fail. We can reasonably expect nothing to go wrong in the short term, and I have lost count of the number of times I have been on a training course for a new product only to encounter it some time later needing attention - and after I'd forgotten all I had been taught previoulsy!

Spares are for things that go wrong after a time, not after five minutes surely.

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Re: To repair... or not repair.

I had the same for a 10 year old shower cubicle needed a new runner.
They just expect you to chuck stuff these days.
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

Welcome to life in the disposable society in which we now live. No spares after 10 years gives you an idea of the manufacturer's lifespan for the product. Pretty shameful to be honest.

Minivanman
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Mook 

Fine with cheap or even 'fashionable' stuff and I accpet that, but if you knew how much we'd paid for that coooker. :rolleyes:

@dvorak 

A ten year old shower cubicle that needs a new runner? I think you are on the edge with that one. :wink:

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Re: To repair... or not repair.


@Minivanman wrote:

 

Trying to source a genuine (not Ebay) part for our ten year old Rangemaster cooker but with little success

 

I keep everything in our house repaired using parts sourced from eBay, and have very rarely had any problems with new or used components.

In the very unlikely event that you are sold something on eBay that doesn't match the description, the eBay returns policy now favours the buyer, and the seller usually has to pay the return postage by means of a pre-paid address label,  so you should never be out of pocket.

This weeks project was rebuilding our ~25 year old Dyson vacuum cleaner, which already has about a third of it's parts replaced with new and used bits from eBay, using hand tools also sourced using eBay.

Don't fear eBay as your source for obsolete parts.

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Minivanman
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Nibiru 

Well no, and I have bought spares from Ebay in the past albeit with caution I must admit, but with the some of those 'Rangemaster' parts being shipped from heaven know where and often China, we do need to be aware yes?

PS. And a ten year old £1000 Rangemaster "obsolute"? I really hope not. :sad:

Luzern
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Minivanman I guess from the initial sentence you've googled the several links from inputting 'rangemaster spares', and you'll do the job yourself. I shan't with my 15 year old Siemens double oven, but found that my oven cleaners could do the jobs with no call out charge, and could get genuine or universal parts to fit. have you sounded out local trades people?

 

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idonno
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

I seem to recall something about manufacturers holding spares for 6 - 7 years after production stops. So 10 years is getting on a bit. Saying that, if you have the part number, quite frequently other similar parts will do the same job e.g. when it comes to items such as thermostats, elements etc.

 

And yet I have no problem sourcing parts for our 20 year old machines at work. I just look in the 20yr old spares parts manual, quote the number and usually by next day, it's been flown in, direct from the manufacturer and the machine is up and running. But that part costs an absolute arm and a leg.

 

I don't have a problem with Ebay stuff nowadays. As mentioned above, you get a printed label for faulty returns. Quite frequently you'll find companies that advertise those sort of spares are big concerns in the UK. As for China, you'll be amazed how often you find 'Made in China'. 

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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Minivanman 

Whilst I can understand you wanting to do the job yourself to save a few pounds it might be better to contact someone who supplies these cookers to come out and do the repair as it's quite possible they might have spares  despite the  manafacturer not having them.

If you ask them to do a free quote for the repair that costs you nothing and from that point you can decide if the cost is worth it, I guess in most cases it will be a lot cheaper than a new cooker and any repair or replacement part will come with a guarantee.

Minivanman
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Luzern 

The part needed is a theromostat for the grill (it sits behind the control knob) and as it so happens my younger brother bought a much older (and bigger) second hand rangemaster last year and which needed a similar part so he went to his local spares supplier in Llanelli. The guy insisted on taking the cookers back to his workshop - these things are really heavy but can be run out on internal rollers - following which he phoned up my brother a week later and said it would cost £90 just for the thermosat! God only knows what the labour charge would have been. He was told in no uncertain terms what to do with that quote and to bring the cooker back tout suit - which of course he had to.

Anyways, heard back from Rangmaster earlier this morning and they have given a contact for a supplier - but it is one I have emailed three times in the last two weeks with no reply other than an acknowledgement, and that they would reply to me "with 48 hours".

:crazy2:

 

Minivanman
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@gleneagles 

I might have to do that.

Called into the shop Monday just gone where we bought the cooker from - told me they got their spares out a catalogue from a company that only deals "with the trade" and so "no, they could not help.... sorry".

You can bet your life they could if I asked the testicle squeezers to come out and fix it!  

PS. Buy a new one? A new Rangemaster cooker would cost me well over a grand now, so I don't think so. :smiley:

Rangemaster_Classic90_DF_BL (2).jpg

 

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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Minivanman, If you paid 1K for that 10 years ago then that's £100 per year over its lifetime so far making that just under £2 per week as the cost of ownership but is that good value for money? I'm not convinced myself.

Minivanman
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

Well I'm happy to consider it value for money, but only if I can repair it!

Our (New World) gas cooker we had at home was still working forty years later, and only died and was dumped after my old Mum did.

Lots more examples I'm sure.  

 

 

Longliner
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Re: To repair... or not repair.

No question we're in a throwaway society. Cars are reckoned to have a seven-year life after which we go and buy a new one (they wish!). Our gas boiler has a lifetime guarantee – you've guessed it, seven years. Our £800 Miele washing machine – seven years.

 

The UK courts consider that six years is a reasonable life expectancy for many household appliances, and in many cases have ordered compensation for failure less of course a hefty slice for wear and tear during those six years.

 

Still goes against the grain of grumpy old gits like me to throw out perfectly good products for want of an easily replaced component. In fairness the latest machinery, notably electronics, often has better performance.

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Re: To repair... or not repair.

@Longliner, the main reason electronics are more reliable is due to limited number of moving parts in them. That is why if anyone uses, for example, a mechanical hard drive you must back it up, as its not if it breaks but when.