cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

The last of the deep mines

Community Veteran
Posts: 2,286
Thanks: 219
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-08-2009

The last of the deep mines

Kellingley deep mine in the UK in North Yorkshire will close next Friday. That's an industry that's gone from employing over 1.2 million to next to nowt. It was costing about £43 a ton to produce as opposed to £30 a ton on the world import markets, so no wonder.
It's not that we'll be generating power from burning less coal, just buying more from abroad. Add to that the fact that somehow the "system" has allowed hefty subsidies for generators wanting to install very dirty diesel generators (worse than coal burning) - these diesels have very little pollution controls because they are exempt from them, just like large marine diesels.
Clean coal burning technology is now available off the shelf from the US and China, so why mortgage the house to overseas lenders?
Crazy or what?
10 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,556
Thanks: 171
Fixes: 2
Registered: 27-05-2011

Re: The last of the deep mines

Not sure your right about continuing to burn coal there Nozzer http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-35070098
Eggborough is bidding for a peaklopping contract, Drax is converting to biomass and Ferrybridge and Longannet are to close  Sad
To do is to be - Neitzsche
To be is to do - Kant
do be do be do - Sinatra
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,286
Thanks: 219
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-08-2009

Re: The last of the deep mines

Yes I understand that, but what I am saying really is that the UK coal industry could be much more competitive if we replaced plant that's closing with stuff that can burn coal very cleanly instead of installing dozens of diesel generators. The technology is proven and is running in various locations around the world, and more demand for UK coal would make it more competitive on world markets, ie the price would drop.  
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,556
Thanks: 171
Fixes: 2
Registered: 27-05-2011

Re: The last of the deep mines

http://www.lowcvp.org.uk/assets/presentations/RTV%20on%20CCS%20to%20FWG%20Dec%2007.pdf
You mean carbon capture and storage, the Chinese are heavily into Super Critical plant but have never actually added the carbon capture element. GB have just cancelled the research into Carbon Capture and Storage as has the US. Clean Coal technology is not available on the market unfortunately.  Embarrassed
To do is to be - Neitzsche
To be is to do - Kant
do be do be do - Sinatra
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,286
Thanks: 219
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-08-2009

Re: The last of the deep mines

It's short-termism gone bananas!
No National system planning at all.
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,322
Thanks: 467
Fixes: 1
Registered: 21-03-2011

Re: The last of the deep mines

Leave the coal in the ground for future generations, meanwhile improve government owned national research on alternatives such as thorium fission and other fusion technologies.  At the same time introduce energy taxes on  manufactured goods, regardless of their country of origin to avoid exporting the pollution load. Those taxes could pay for the research. Our power infrastructure is now largely owned by people interested in short term profit rather  than long term investment.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,286
Thanks: 219
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-08-2009

Re: The last of the deep mines

The Government seems hell-bent on removing funding for research though.
I think every potential MP should prove that they have a basic understanding of scientific principles. That might, just might, improve things.
Community Veteran
Posts: 13,925
Thanks: 515
Fixes: 8
Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: The last of the deep mines

Quote from: nozzer
Crazy or what?

Thats tje way this country is going unfortunately.
It's like the new runway arguement... we can't expand without one apparently... yet other new forms of travel are out there waiting to be built but lack investment - hyperloops and all that stuff. The UK used to be a leader in investing in new tech and R&D.. now we're just a "whatever gets it done easily and solves the problem temporarily" type of country. Oh and we're also harping on at India about its emissions while not giving a stuff about our own.
As for the money side of it... it kind of makes sense although I hate to say it. We don't have an empire anymore, we control very little assets around the world... so what better than to control the financial side of it all instead? The only trouble there is that we're also so skint that other countries are pouring their money into us instead of the other way around as it should be. Oh yes.. well we are putting money out there... just not in the right way. Financing Indias space program doesn't do diddly squat for us.
/rant
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,924
Thanks: 602
Fixes: 8
Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: The last of the deep mines

All deep mines should be closed unless there is some way of extracting the coal to the surface without the need for miners to be underground working the machinery, something which I guess is impossible.
You only need to meet one of the thousands of miners who have suffered from lung problems as a result of breathing in coal dust to understand why I make that statement.
Even with open cast mines there is some degree of risk to those handling the coal despite the technology used to reduce the risk.
There are cleaner methods of producing energy with less risk to those who work in those industries.
YoungMan
Newbie
Posts: 6
Registered: 10-12-2015

Re: The last of the deep mines

I'm a Mining Engineer and I worked down the pits in the North East in 70's
They were awful. The cages were built for Snow White's crew, so you rode underground stooped over. When you get out at the station, then there was a long walk in - also stooped where the drives were under pressure.
At the longwall face you clambered in gloves and kneepads behind a shearer. You could hear it, nice & loud but ear protectors are dangerous in that environment. You need to be able to hear warnings from your mates. You could hardly see the shearer for dust.
Back in daylight, after negotiating the lamp room and crush - serviced by horribly injured miners no longer able to work below(i.e. no legs), you then had to strip in the 'dirty' side of the baths. All your dirty gear into your locker and into the showers with a bar of soap, towel and flip flops. But no matter how hard you washed, the dust cling on somewhere. Especially the eye-lashes. We were early Goths down at the Rising Sun Club.
So its sad they closed the pits, and Wilson shut more than Thatcher remember - but I'd have shut the lot.
We have shed-loads of coal off shore just begging for in-situ gasification. Alas the morons who run this country are happier to pander to the Corporation whilst taxing the heck out of us.
Last word on Climate Change/Energy - according to Corbyn's brother, if the atmosphere was Big Ben - the top inch would be CO2. Of that inch, 1mm is attributable to man. The rest is termites, volcanoes etc.. 
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,556
Thanks: 171
Fixes: 2
Registered: 27-05-2011

Re: The last of the deep mines

By far the cheapest large scale power plant is pulverised coal and that is the technology of choice for developing countries such as India, Pakistan and including Africa.  So coal will continue to be used large-scale and swamp our stopping useing it.
I would suggest https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_coal_gasification for Britain as after 250 years exploitation there is still 70% of reserves still in the ground.  Smiley
To do is to be - Neitzsche
To be is to do - Kant
do be do be do - Sinatra