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The 'YELLOW' fields of England

pin2011
Grafter
Posts: 109
Registered: 09-06-2011

The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Why do farmers insist on producing rape seed oil every year? Fields and even more fields of the wretched stuff is grown every year.There must be a better use for this land such as affordable housing or new industrial estates. Why keep on farming a crop which appears to cause more problems than it solves?? I can't think of a meaningful use for this crop other than to paint the countryside YELLOW every year. Much to the annoyance of hay fever sufferers and asthmatics. Is there a lot of cash as a farmers subsidy for this crop?
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Community Veteran
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Lots of rapeseed here in Essex and it looks great and has a wonderful smell as you drive past.  Rapeseed oil is very good for cooking and not expensive to buy.
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Rape used to be used as a break crop between more profitable cereal crops (crop rotation) but is now heavily subsidised because of the Climate Change Mitigation Policy (increase the use of bio fuels) and rapeseed is the primary source for making bio diesel
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapeseed#Biodiesel
Quote
Rapeseed oil is used as diesel fuel, either as biodiesel, straight in heated fuel systems, or blended with petroleum distillates for powering motor vehicles. Biodiesel may be used in pure form in newer engines without engine damage and is frequently combined with fossil-fuel diesel in ratios varying from 2% to 20% biodiesel. Owing to the costs of growing, crushing, and refining rapeseed biodiesel, rapeseed-derived biodiesel from new oil costs more to produce than standard diesel fuel, so diesel fuels are commonly made from the used oil. Rapeseed oil is the preferred oil stock for biodiesel production in most of Europe, accounting for about 80% of the feedstock, partly because rapeseed produces more oil per unit of land area compared to other oil sources, such as soy beans, but primarily because canola oil has a significantly lower gel point than most other vegetable oils. An estimated 66% of total rapeseed oil supply in the European Union is expected to be used for biodiesel production in the 2010-2011 year
 
Community Veteran
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Also contains high level of Omega 3 and 6. 
Community Veteran
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

One reason Rapeseed is becoming more common, it is more drought resistant than other cereral crops (wheat, barley, maize), there is no subsidy on Rapeseed oil.
Rapeseed oil also goes into "rapecake" an animal feed product.
Quote
Rapecake is a by-product of the rapeseed milling process mainly used as feed. The oilcake contains up to 36 protein and up to 10 fat and is characterised by high calorific value and abundant irreplaceable amino acids. 1 kilogramme of rapecake equals 1 feed unit. Many feed specialists point out that rapecake is one of the alternatives to soy products

Farming methods have changed in the past 30 years with UK now being a major wheat importer from Canada rather than home grown wheat, cost of 1 feed unit of corn based animal food is more expensive to produce than rapecake. This has other effects on health as Canadian wheat is higher in gluten than traditional grown UK Wheat, hence affects the diet of folk who have gluten intolerance allergies.
As Artmo says it's good for cooking, it is extracted in the same way as extra virgin olive oil but lower in saturated fat (RapeseedOil: 7%, Olive Oil: 14%).
Community Veteran
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Our rather PC cousins in the US of A are so sensitive about the "proper" name for this crop that they insist on calling it Canola fearful it wouldn't be accepted by the buying public. In spite the name for it -Rape- has been around for centuries.
I think shutter started a similar thread a few days ago.
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Community Veteran
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Most of the farms will have been dairy farms that had to change after foot and mouth hit last time.  They are getting by with what their land can do.
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Quote from: Oldjim
but is now heavily subsidised

@Oldjim:- Not sure where you get heavily subsidised  from, IMO it is not subsidised, but just highly valued because its diverse uses, (looking at "rape oil futures" in this weeks Farmers Guardian, price is currently very high for August).
Edit:- Sorry I stand corrected, canola is subsidised...... http://farm.ewg.org/progdetail.php?fips=00000&progcode=canola
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

The subsidy is indirect and has the effect of pushing up the price for rapeseed oil
http://www.just-food.com/news/biofuel-subsidy-cuts-threat-to-commodity-volatility-copa-cogeca_id1191...
Quote
The European Commission has accepted scientific advice that palm oil, soybean and rapeseed-derived biodiesel generate as many carbon emissions as fossil fuels because the cultivation of their feedstocks promotes the clearance of virgin land, including rain forest.
The scrapping of duty reductions, subsidies and minimum biofuel content rules for blended fuels in the EU is likely to follow, depressing demand for biofuels, especially if the EU's lead is followed elsewhere.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/04bf4788-92b6-11e0-bd88-00144feab49a.html#axzz1umEfF9qz
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High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/04bf4788-92b6-11e0-bd88-00144feab49a.html#ixzz1umIFQPCp
The EU’s 27 member states have also showered billions of euros on producers of ethanol and biodiesel in the form of subsidies. The Global Subsidies Initiative, a non-profit group, estimated that the annual total for 2008 was more than €3bn. The US, Brazil, China and Australia have taken a similar approach.
itsme
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Quote from: journeys
Farming methods have changed in the past 30 years with UK now being a major wheat importer from Canada rather than home grown wheat, cost of 1 feed unit of corn based animal food is more expensive to produce than rapecake. This has other effects on health as Canadian wheat is higher in gluten than traditional grown UK Wheat, hence affects the diet of folk who have gluten intolerance allergies.

So why does the price of wheat based foods increase when there is a shortage of UK wheat?
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Grafter
Posts: 666
Registered: 31-07-2007

Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

I am just adding a couple of my own thoughts about rapeseed which possibly have no bearing on the general trend of this thread, but here goes anyway  Wink
The scenery from my front window for the last 10 years has just been abruptly changed for me.....
Before,  I could watch the local cricket team several times per week during the summer and also see a wonderful expanse of the strong yellow of a field of rapeseed in bloom.  Grin
( Explanation.....  Only because we live on a hill opposite)
Now, (and it all happened within one year) All I see is a sprawling new estate of new houses together with its attendant traffic and fumes and still further building transport and the dust clouds it causes.
And I can no longer see ANY cricket which has been blanked off completely AND no longer will there be a wonderful sea of yellow every year.
Is that what they call progress? For me it's a double whammy!  Cry Cry
modified for typo!
Infinity
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

BBC Breakfast item Tuesday 29th May
Rape seed oil is a profitable crop, £380 per tonne, China loves the oil, nutty taste, high smoke point, lots of Omega 3, half the saturated fat of Olive Oil, a good healthy choice.
Too expensive for bio fuel, at the moment.
When yellow flowers die, oil is in the seed in the buds.
Good for Bees too, and other insects.

Also here...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18249840#
Community Veteran
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

I read a similar report yesterday.  Farmers are putting their fields over to rapeseed because it is a profitable crop. It also requires little maintenance unlike some other crops.
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

There is a glut in Olive oil this year, prices have plummeted from £6000 per ton to £3000 per ton.........doesn't bode well for the Greek or Spanish economies.
Infinity
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Re: The 'YELLOW' fields of England

Just been to Tesco, Olive Oil reduced from £3.89 to £3.00, may not be connected of course