cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

The Navy Lark

Community Veteran
Posts: 5,322
Thanks: 467
Fixes: 1
Registered: 21-03-2011

The Navy Lark

It sounds like the Navy's planners and Captains originally had jobs as script writers for the Navy Lark radio programme.

The HMS Ambush one of our new nuclear subs, ran into another boat.

and the Type 45 Destroyers, tasked with defending those aircraft carriers without planes, cannot be repaired under warranty when their engines breakdown when they operate in the warm waters of the Persian Gulf.  Were they specified only for use on the Thames and Battersea Park Boating Lake?

Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
20 REPLIES
rongtw
Seasoned Hero
Posts: 6,341
Thanks: 1,157
Fixes: 11
Registered: 01-12-2010

Re: The Navy Lark

A lot of this boils down to OVER cutting of the MOD budget Embarrassed

Asus ROG Hero Vii Z97 , Intel i5 4690k ,ROG Asus Strix 1070,
samsung 850evo 250gig , WD black 2 TB . Asus Phoebus sound ,
16 gig Avexir ram 2400 , water cooling Corsair H100i gtx ,
Corsair 750HXI Psu , Phanteks Enthoo pro case .
Community Veteran
Posts: 16,866
Thanks: 1,141
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: The Navy Lark

Anyone who has served in the navy, around about the time of that famous programme on the radio, will recognise many similar type events as depicted in the hilarious "goings on" on HMS TROUTBRIDGE... indeed, the REAL HMS TROUBRIDGE adopted the programme..

Minivanman
Hero
Posts: 4,794
Thanks: 1,046
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-11-2014

Re: The Navy Lark

I'm sure Direct Line insurance will have them sorted out in no time! Wink

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,556
Thanks: 171
Fixes: 2
Registered: 27-05-2011

Re: The Navy Lark

I agree something seems to have gone wrong with the procurement process if the gas turbine systems can't handle the warmer water in the gulf and the Mediterranean. Gas turbines are the most sensitive primary mover to ambient conditions although this has always been known and should have been considered.   Rolls Royce obviously knew enough to exclude it in their warranty. My favourite solution to maintain output in high ambient temperatures is fogging where water mist is injected into the air intake of the GT and this will give around 10% more output. 

The cutting of a hole in the side of the vessel to insert a diesel generator headline is a cheap shot by the journalist as this will be standard operating procedure on a modern steel skinned vessel. It's not possible to arrange the routing for a change out of major component in the tight spaces allowed so the designers will have always proposed this. 

 

To do is to be - Neitzsche
To be is to do - Kant
do be do be do - Sinatra
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,322
Thanks: 467
Fixes: 1
Registered: 21-03-2011

Re: The Navy Lark


Minivanman wrote:

I'm sure Direct Line insurance

Or Admiral Insurance.

Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,929
Thanks: 603
Fixes: 8
Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: The Navy Lark

So where does the term,'fit for purpose' come in ?

Clearly they are not fit for purpose and the cost of making then fit for purpose should not rest with the tax payer.

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,929
Thanks: 603
Fixes: 8
Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: The Navy Lark

 As for that sub running into a boat it sounds like a sick joke, Imagine the million of pounds worth of electronics used for detecting other vessels does it not work or were the crew asleep ?

Another example of tax payers money being spent.

rongtw
Seasoned Hero
Posts: 6,341
Thanks: 1,157
Fixes: 11
Registered: 01-12-2010

Re: The Navy Lark

Cant wait for the Navy,s report of the accident ,, Captain my be demoted if was his fault

Asus ROG Hero Vii Z97 , Intel i5 4690k ,ROG Asus Strix 1070,
samsung 850evo 250gig , WD black 2 TB . Asus Phoebus sound ,
16 gig Avexir ram 2400 , water cooling Corsair H100i gtx ,
Corsair 750HXI Psu , Phanteks Enthoo pro case .
Minivanman
Hero
Posts: 4,794
Thanks: 1,046
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-11-2014

Re: The Navy Lark

Cheesy

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
Community Veteran
Posts: 16,866
Thanks: 1,141
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: The Navy Lark

Considering how hard it is to become an "ordinary" submariner, and the amount of training and practical work that the watchkeeping officers do to gain their dolphins and their "command" qualifications on the "Perisher" course at Portland. I find it unbelievable that the Officer - of - the - Watch did not see any ships, that could cause a problem,  by using the periscope, before giving the command to "surface"...  

 

Even if it were running just below the surface he should have been using  the periscope occasionally for visual look out, I still cannot imagine how he missed seeing the tanker. ... they don`t move very fast.. (probably 15 knots).

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,929
Thanks: 603
Fixes: 8
Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: The Navy Lark

I know nothing about submarines other than what I have seen in films but surely it cannot be down to one single person using a periscope ?

If that was the case then an enemy ship could be on top of them before they knew it ?

Surely the mass of electronics gives them data about everything in the area near the submarine ?

This is not the  first incident with one of these subs and unlikely to be the last

Community Veteran
Posts: 16,866
Thanks: 1,141
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: The Navy Lark

It`s not all about the electronics & gizmos, it is up to the Officer Of the Watch, to determine if it is safe for him to surface the sub, he can do that by checking the electronic sensors, and then a final "all round" check with the periscope to ensure that there are no visible signs of ships before giving the order to surface. ....

 

In theory, he should have known his position, relative to ANY surface vessel that had been detected previously, even up to an hour before.... as there should have been a tracking system showing the course(s) and speed(s) of any vessels in the immediate area.  Poking up the periscope for a final check to see where those vessels were at the time of coming up to the surface, would have been a routine basic operation. ...

rongtw
Seasoned Hero
Posts: 6,341
Thanks: 1,157
Fixes: 11
Registered: 01-12-2010

Re: The Navy Lark

I hope the software for the scanners wasnt written by Lithium Cheesy

Asus ROG Hero Vii Z97 , Intel i5 4690k ,ROG Asus Strix 1070,
samsung 850evo 250gig , WD black 2 TB . Asus Phoebus sound ,
16 gig Avexir ram 2400 , water cooling Corsair H100i gtx ,
Corsair 750HXI Psu , Phanteks Enthoo pro case .
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,346
Thanks: 609
Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: The Navy Lark


gleneagles wrote:

I know nothing about submarines other than what I have seen in films


You mean the bit where the bloke with the earphones, who can tell the difference between a dolphin and a shark by the beep, says the enemy vessel is 512.6 feet off the starboard bow.