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Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

cyrilclark1
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Registered: 22-01-2012

Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Several times recently I have been told by staff at a filling station that supermarket fuel is not good for engines.
The particular filling station, which supplies Esso fuel hasn't an axe to grind on prices - today they are selling diesel at133.9p. Typical prices in my area are 135.9  to 137.9p. One large station  is charging a whopping 148.9p for a lire of diesel and is always busy!
Is the comparison of supermarket v independent fuel supplier an urban myth?


27 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Can't say its ever worried me to be honest but then volvo engines will burn any old tripe without too much hassle lol
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

I don't think the supermarkets would dare to sell sub-standard fuel.
My VW dealer advised using 'ordinary' diesel such as supermarkets sell in by Polo rather than the likes of BP V-Power as they said the engines are set up for 'standard fuel'.
Call me 'w23'
At any given moment in the universe many things happen. Coincidence is a matter of how close these events are in space, time and relationship.
Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

I've been running my cars (and bikes) on supermarket fuel for over 10 years with no problems.
WTF
Grafter
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Registered: 14-09-2012

Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

The fuel from some oil companies - I think Shell is one - have some additves that are supposed to reduce engine wear.
I imagine that otherwise, the fuel is essentially the same as it has to conform to EU (bless 'em) standards.
Also some get their fuel from big oil - Sainsburys apparently get theirs from BP.  Tesco source from a company they part-own called Greenergy - I guess it buys on the market.
Community Veteran
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Two or three years back I did a lot of checks on my tank by tank mpg using different fuels.
The daily travel was consistent as my wife drove about 35 miles each way for work over the same route and the checks ran for some months.
What we found was that Tesco fuel was the lowest mpg and BP was the best - difference being 10%. Asda was pretty good with a difference of 2 or 3%. Jet was very similar!
Now, we use Jet or Asda. The drive to the BP garage negates any mpg advantage over those two!

I understand that the petrol itself is no different from each supplier but, the additives specified by the outlet chain make a huge difference!
Geoff,
York.
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Just as well my local filling station is Asda then  Wink
Tesco is a 30mile drive away, negates any "x p off " offers.
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

There is a main road that goes from Southampton, to Fawley, Oil Refinery... it is very busy with tankers from...... SHELL, ESSO, Sainsbury`s, Tesco, Morrisons,  etc and un marked tankers... I don`t think they are all going there for a "Tanker Drivers Picnic"....
Community Veteran
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

That so true and a damn nuisance they are on that crowded road.
I don't think there is any real difference as, as you say, they all fill up at the same refinery. And you even see different branded tankers filling up station tanks. I often used to see an Esso tanker in a Gulf station and many other mix and matches.
The only real problem is water in some petrol station tanks. Especially if they are running low.
That's an additive I can do without.
Community Veteran
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Not sure if it's a myth  but I was told never to fill your car when a tanker  was refilling the tanks as it disturbed the sludge in the tanks which could get drawn up into your tank if refuelling at the same time.
As a side issue does the SAE of the oil you use have any effect on your mpg .?
Community Veteran
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Although we order fuel from the same company (have tank in yard), it arrives in a variety of fuel trucks, sometimes plain, could be Shell, BP, Esso, but never a supermarket truck (yet).
nanotm
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

it used to be true when they were using LRP fuels which had a higher burning point and older cars were at risk of snapping the cam shaft .....
nowadays there all LRP so it makes no difference just make sure your putting in the same octane rated fuel all the time (chopping and changing can cause issues)
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
David_W
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Quote from: gleneagles
As a side issue does the SAE of the oil you use have any effect on your mpg .?

Not that I'm aware, as I understand it, the SAE is basically the viscosity of the oil at set temps.  From what I have read though (bear in mind, I'm a biker not a car driver), using Fully Synthetic can improve your MPG, the trade off being that Fully Synthetic is more expensive than Semi-Synth or Mineral oil.  Another way to improve the cost is a Santander 123 card, you get 3% cash back on petrol purchases (not sure it applies to supermarkets, can't recall) so if you put in £10/week (biker remember!) it saves you £16 a year (which is less than the annual cost of the card, but you get money back every time you use it).
I recently tried to save money by changing my oil/filter myself, the last person to do the change though did the oil nut up so tight that I'd have to take it to a garage to get my oil changed, all for the sake of a nut  Roll eyes
Superuser
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

I used to live near an oil refinery and it was common to see a train of mixed Shell; Jet; BP; Joe bloggs wagons being slowly shunted past the filling pipes.  Similarly for the queue of road tankers.  Sometimes if the weather was fine you'd see a bucket of 'additive' being added.
M
PowerLee
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Re: Supermarket fuel - good or not so good.

Trip computer in my car returns between 2 & 3 MPG average less on supermarket fuel then using Esso / Shell.
Seeing as my local Esso garage is the same price for unleaded as nearby Tesco / Morrisons PLUS the Esso gives Tesco clubcard points, I fill up there instead.