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Sunburn

Minivanman
Seasoned Hero
Posts: 9,789
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Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Re: Sunburn

By skin type I expect you mean genetics, and there is certainly evidence to support that plus of course how much we actually expose ourselves to the sun. We travel more as well, there were none of those holidays in Spain when I was a kid - pebbles on the beach at Brighton were the best we could ever hope for.

Best to be cautious if you have lighter skin, but best to stay out of the sun if you have as skin cancer is avoidable in the vast majority of cases - but getting back to the original post, more care for the kiddies as they are more liable to burn easily.

Any sign of sun and my Mrs is chasing the grandchildren around trying to slap lotion on them. Don't want to end up in court!

RobPN
Aspiring Hero
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Registered: ‎17-05-2013

Re: Sunburn


@7up wrote:

Only reason I ask is that over the years there has been lots of publicity about using it and yet more and more cases of skin cancer are being detected. Oddly i knew an Ozzie guys moons ago who said he'd never used it his entire life..


@7up 

One factor (pun intended) which has been mentioned in reports about the increase in cases of skin cancer in the UK is the popularity of the package holiday to sunny Spain, Barbados :wink:, etc. which apparently started in the 1950s-60s, the affect of which would take some years to filter through.

Even though the population density is lower, apparently Wales and Cornwall (and Devon?) are the areas with the highest incidence of skin cancer in the UK, which is being partially blamed on the surfing and beach culture which exists in those areas.

Quite a long time ago now, I worked on the beach for a few years wearing only shorts and the only bit I used to bother with was to use sun-block (containing zinc oxide) on my nose, and sometimes lips, (you've probably seen cricket players or lifeguards on TV with white or brightly coloured noses!).

Although I'm not saying they won't get skin cancer, people working outdoors like that from early summer get the chance to gradually acclimatise their skin over a period, but it's an eye-opener to see some people who turn up at the beach on their holidays, then proceed to strip off for the first time that year and lay in the sun all day. At the end of the day when leaving the beach some of them literally looked like lobsters (bright red), and some could hardly walk due to painful skin, and I've even seen blistered skin.

What we call sun-bathing, Australians often refer to as sun-baking!

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RobPN
Aspiring Hero
Posts: 2,391
Thanks: 854
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Registered: ‎17-05-2013

Re: Sunburn

No-one seems to have mentioned The Ozone Hole ...

... coming to a (sun)screen near you!

That is another fairly recent phenomenon.