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Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

Midnight_Caller
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Registered: 15-04-2007

Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

Hi All
Just seen this:
[quote="The Mirror"]
Stitching-up claimants is all part of the job, says Jobcentre insider
Former Jobcentre Plus adviser tells of a “brutal and bullying” culture of “setting claimants up to fail”
Last week Iain Duncan Smith met a whistle-blower who has worked for his Department for Work and Pensions for more than 20 years.
Giving the Secretary of State a dossier of evidence, the former Jobcentre Plus adviser told him of a “brutal and bullying” culture of “setting claimants up to fail”.
“The pressure to sanction customers was constant,” he said. “It led to people being stitched-up on a daily basis.”
Read More Here

Am I Shocked No!
It is good that some one has blown the whistle.
9 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 16-02-2009

Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

I remember signing on in the 90's, it was a culture of answer is "we'll stop you dole" now whats the question?
I was even at a seminar held by them and I asked that question of them, you can guess the answer  Wink
I haven't signed on for several years now, even though I am unwaged/unemployed, as there is NOTHING to help me there, just hassle.
Thunderclap
Grafter
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Registered: 08-09-2008

Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

Cool Back in the early 90's, a guy I knew was employed as a client advisor in UB40 Land. Being a skilled ex-ship building Geordie, he was plain speaking. Of his co-workers he said, anywhere else they are barely qualified to clean floors, but at the Job Center, they are the managers in charge. Twenty years on, that would explain everything. "They're all idiots," was his honest observation. He also made the point that most of his clients were highly skilled persons, too qualified for the Job Center's service.
Moderator
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Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

I was unemployed for a few months back in 1980 after leaving Midland Bank till I started a job at the GLC.
I had some savings so used those to tied me over then decided I'd best sign on when that was all gone. I was subsequently told that, because I hadn't signed on as soon as I stopped work, I wasn't entitled to anything. When I demonstrated that I'd actually saved the government a considerable (for the time) amount of money by not claiming I was told that was silly of me Shocked

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Community Veteran
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Registered: 16-02-2009

Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

At one point I was given a holiday (in England) and went to the dole office and said I will be away for a week on holiday but still looking for work, for answer see above, my answer to that "well if you F*******r's actually PAID me anything you could stop it, so F You" and walked out, at that point I had a mortgage to pay and no money from the dole, lots of letters saying we will pay your mortgage, no we won't, etc but no actual money. I had ticked the mortgage insurance on my application but somehow it had been removed so I didn't have any insurance even though I thought I had.
I ended up going back to Uni just to get enough to pay the mortgage  Undecided
itsme
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Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

@mav
Think you were given some daft information. I signed on in 1977 and 2006 after several months not working and received NI based JSA. The only time having a gap between leaving a job and signing on is if it take it into another NI year and you will not qualify for NI based JSA, but I think this has to several months.
Edit 1977 it was 4 months before I signed on and 2006 it was 5 months
Community Veteran
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Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

I went to an unemployment office twice back in 1998 after being made redundant for the first time. I had a mortgage then and wanted to get some pre-paid tax back to pay the bills. The first time was to sign on, the second time was to meet with an "advisor". I quickly realised that no hope lay on that course of action. I think the whole process is designed to demean those out of work, particularly when those who have advisors who know the system can extract so much money for no previous contribution.
I've never, since I had my first job which involved scraping food off plates as a dish washer in a restaurant, received any state benefit. I've always had the luck to find some kind of income/work to keep going without state aid, but I strongly feel those people who genuinely need help from the state should be treated compassionately. That would include providing good well managed staff at Job Centres  Those scroungers who "play the system" should receive just enough to avoid starvation.
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itsme
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Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

In years long past it was important to sign on because of NI credits. Not so much nowadays as you only require 30+ years and seem to be based on what you paid in a tax year. But it use to be 44 complete years so if weeks are missing you will not get a full pension.
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Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

You can BUY NI credits, before you retire. I need 9 years worth (I think) in the next 15 yeas (unless they raise the retirement age again), so even if I don't get a job in the next 15 years, I can pay them to get a full pension.
It was discussed on the Money Program a few years ago, when women who had been working but took time out to raise a family were low on credits, the best option was to take a loan to buy the "years" then get a full pension.
x47c
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Registered: 14-08-2009

Re: Stitching-up the unemployed is all part of the job

....which is why they are wise to this one
and it now costs a lot more to buy back the credits for past missing years (class 3) after the end of the current year in question than it does to voluntary pay them (class 2) at the time/monthly whatever assuming you are not in PAYE employment where you pay class 1
You can only go back in years so far as I recall to pay up - no idea how far nor whether it costs more to pay back further years back than more recent missing years.
HMG is changing the law so that now you will required 35 years credits - yes it was reduced to 30 years some time ago and is now going back up.
It's complicated and you need as ever to DYOR.