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Spud storage

Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Spud storage

I like potatoes!!  there I've admitted it it. I don't much care how they're cooked or served I will eat'm...
I also like Jersey Royals but, don't like the horrendous asking price for them. As an aside, have you ever tried the local potatoes grown on the Isle-of-Wight? make Jerseys seem tasteless.
But, I am particularly fond of straight boiled baby news, just eaten with a light coat of (Colmans English ready made) mustard...delicious. Try it if you never have.
But, how best to store them. Perceived wisdom is a "cool dark place" but not in a fridge (they don't come much cooler and darker than that) But the growers suggest a fridge is not good as it changes the molecular content into something unpleasant for humans.
Now Tesco has repackaged their baby new potatoes (more plastic waste) which has a note on the film cover "keep in the fridge" inside there's more "best kept in a fridge"
So who is right? Or are Tesco having the spuds coated in some chemical nasty to counteract the effects of keeping them in a fridge.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Spud storage

Always kept ours in cupboard. Not sure why you'd want to keep them fridge as they don't tend to spoil too easily.
I'd heard that they get sweeter if you keep them in the fridge rather than do anything nasty.
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Re: Spud storage

A friend used to grow his own potatoes and once he dug them up he put a quantity in a tin box filled with soil and buried the box in the garden.  At Christmas he would open the box and have fresh new spuds for Christmas Day.
nadger
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Re: Spud storage

We keep potatoes in cupboard under stairs.
I remember my father doing this
Interesting how good potatoes come from islands as some of the nicest French spuds come from Noirmoutier off the Vendee coast.
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Re: Spud storage

I store potatoes in 10kg sacks (the type that carrots\oranges are sold in), then keep them in the barn packed in about 2 feet of straw, the sacks are kept about a foot apart. Found the potatoes of 3-4 inch diameter store the best.
I enjoy small potatoes, boiled in the skins, then run under a cold tap, the skins come away with a gentle pressure with fingers/thumbs, finally sautéed with a knob of butter with either 20-30 fine chopped mint leaves, or several twists from the pepper grinder.
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Re: Spud storage

I love new potatoes with their skins still intact. SWMBO cooks them with herbs and what-not (I have no idea) but they are delicious - my favouirite Smiley

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alanb
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Registered: 24-05-2007

Re: Spud storage

I have a little theory. And it is only a theory, but here goes, for what it is worth.
I think that the supermarkets do not store the potatoes appropriately before they hit the supermarket shelves for selling. Have you noticed how quickly potatoes from a supermarket start to rot these days? It happens within days of you buying them, and you'll often find a potato or two in the bag, that is starting to rot or go a bit mushy, as soon as you get them home. So, I reckon they tell you to refrigerate them because most of them would be unusable after a few days if you didn't.
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Re: Spud storage

You may well have something there alamb. Certainly, baking spuds from supermarkets can turn green (not good to eat!!) almost overnight. A brother-in-law (deceased now) was a farmer in Huntingdon and used to give us a sack of potatoes occasionally. He kept them in Hessian sacks in a cavity under the front step of his cottage. They were coated in dried mud and very cool. Not bad to eat.
Continuing the island theory, ever tried Canarian potatoes? (Tenerife etc.) where they cook them in sea water, black skinned and very salty. Not bad but, a bit of an acquired taste.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Spud storage

Re turning green
Interesting point because I grow my own and the seed potatoes don't turn green but the ones I chit from the supermarket, as that variety isn't available yet as seed potatoes, always turn green
I either store in paper sacks or in woven polypropylene sacks (garden netting gets delivered in them from my usual supplier)
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Re: Spud storage

Buy Smash.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
Plusnet Help Team
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Re: Spud storage

I use one of these http://images.naturalcollection.com/images/s302p18704-1.jpg as recommended by my mother who I refer to as " the culinary oracle" Smiley They seem to last a lot longer, never leave them in the plastic bag if you buy them pre-packaged from the supermarket
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Re: Spud storage

We don`t buy a lot of potatoes, so long term storage is not a problem.... short term, we buy from the supermarket, and keep in original packaging until needed... meanwhile, they are kept inside the tumble dryer.! ! ! .. after opening the packaging, they are transferred into a plastic carrier bag, twisted closed, and returned to the dryer.... never had any problems with them!....
Oh, yes, before someone comments,    Roll eyes Roll eyes Roll eyes  we DO remember to take them out before using the dryer for its proper purpose.!  Cheesy
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Re: Spud storage

I used to keep my potatoes open in a vegetable rack but these days they go straight into a dark cupboard in the plastic bag but opened.
They keep for far longer than in the rack.
My 24 year old daughter would probably look at the 'Best Before' date and declare them inedible Roll eyes
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alanb
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Re: Spud storage

Quote from: Petlew
You may well have something there alamb.

I've been pondering this, on and off, for a few years. Buying potatoes from the supermarket is a bit hit and miss. Sometimes they are in good condition and will last ages if you keep them cool. Other times, they'll already be feeling a bit spongy when you buy them. My guess is that the latter have probably been damaged by ice that has been allowed to form inside the potato, probably because they have been held at very low temperatures in a cold store, probably to preserve their appearance, which supermarkets give a very high priority. This seem like a plausible explanation, but I have no idea if it is accurate.
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Re: Spud storage

I wonder if it's to do with the origin of the potato Undecided At this time of year when supermarkets are selling locally grown potatoes they certainly look better on the shelves.