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Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

TORPC
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Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

[quote= http://www.lifecoreconsulting.com/scottish-scientists-unveil-star-trek-style-tractor-beam/]Remember watching episodes of Star Trek and seeing the SS Enterprise save the day by pulling another spaceship or object towards it at a crucial moment? Well, this ability is no longer confined to the realms of science fiction or high-tech special effects. Physicists at the university have successfully managed to get an ultrasound device to exert force on an object and pull it towards an energy source.
Apparently this is the first time a working acoustic tractor beam has been used to move anything bigger than a microscopic target. The team’s work was carried out as part of a £3.6m programme initiated by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and pooled the knowledge and expertise of four UK universities (Bristol, Dundee, Glasgow and Southampton) with industrial firms. The partnership between the universities and industry has played a pivotal role in developing ultrasound devices and capabilities that are far more sophisticated than anything previously seen.
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

Not much use in the vacuum of space.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
nanotm
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

oh contraire,
if your seriously investigating space travel in manned vessels  its extremely important to be able to deflect any and all space debris from your vessel so that its structural integrity is maintained whilst traversing the vast expanse, otherwise anything more than 5 atoms wide slamming into your hull will cause catastrophic loss, its one of the main reasons why space exploration is such a no go, a spec of dust travelling at half the speed of light will breach any known material however redundant layers of impact absorbent material are used in the lining of current space vehicles (which makes them prohibitively expensive)
this new tech could if reliable and commercially viable speed up mans ability to traverse through space (particularly the cut price travel options) and if it works in atmo then it could eliminate the problems of bird strikes etc for planes making normal flight so much saferSmiley
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

so perhaps you can explain how ultrasound works in a vacuum
nanotm
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

the same way it works normally the sound waves bounce back off the object to the receiver.....only slightly faster as there not hindered by tonnes of atomic mass
if electromagnetic spectrum waves didn't traverse space then we wouldn't be able to get heat from the sun ........
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

so no doubt you have a very erudite explanation as to why sound waves which require a gaseous medium to propagate can do so without one
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

Quote from: nanotm
otherwise anything more than 5 atoms wide slamming into your hull will cause catastrophic loss, its one of the main reasons why space exploration is such a no go, a spec of dust travelling at half the speed of light will breach any known material however redundant layers of impact absorbent material are used in the lining of current space vehicles (which makes them prohibitively expensive)

er... what?  
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/watchtheskies/meteor_cloud.html
Quote
"Mariner 4 ran into a cloud of space dust," says Bill Cooke of the Marshall Space Flight Center Space Environments Team. "For about 45 minutes the spacecraft experienced a shower of meteoroids more intense than any Leonid meteor storm we've ever seen on Earth." The impacts ripped away bits of insulation and temporarily changed the craft's orientation in space.
Fortunately, the damage was slight and the mission's main objective -- a flyby of Mars -- had been completed two years earlier.

and
Quote
"Of all NASA's Mars spacecraft, Mariner 4 was the only one we've sent with a micrometeoroid detector," he continued. During its journey to Mars and back, the detector registered occasional impacts from interplanetary dust grains -- as expected. The space between the planets is sprinkled with dust particles. They're harmless in small numbers.
nanotm
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

if that were true then you wouldn't be able to hear sounds through solid rock, sound is created in the aural canal in the ear but it is essentially just an energy wave on the low end of the electromagnetic spectrum and as such generally only traverses short distances before it looses the ability to excite molecules, sound can travel a lot further in a vacume as it doesn't loose energy
the fact that light traverses space actually proves this as does the two way radio mounted on the outside of a space suit so that the speaker is external to the suit and yet is still fully heard by its occupant (because when its inside the suit it causes feedback problems when using open mic comms)
all this in spite of the wrong stuff taught at gcse /alevel science (but then again they also teach that in a dc circuit electrons flow from positive to negative)  on the grounds that its easier to understand, never mind that in order to generate a pure sound the best AV equipment utilises a vacume tube .......
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

I really suggest you start checking your supposed facts
The reason why you can hear sound after it has passed through a solid medium is that the medium vibrates very slightly when hit by a sound wave and this vibration then causes vibration (aka sound waves) in the gaseous medium at the other side
In a vacuum there is nothing to vibrate
Infinity
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

Quote from: Oldjim
so perhaps you can explain how ultrasound works in a vacuum

If you are referring to the type of Ultrasound Scan used on a patients body, the Ultrasound waves travel through a medium, ie skin, muscle, fat & Water.
The probe is always in contact with the body, usually through a Gel.
Astronaut being scanned ?
Or is there another purpose you are thinking of.
Even Ultrasound Scans of metal or plastic for example, in a Vacuum, ie Space, I would have thought the probe needs to be in direct contact with the object?
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

Ultrasound does not need direct contact with an object - think ultrasonic distance detectors on your car - the waves travel through air, bounce off a solid object and the time difference between the transmission and detected reflected image is used to determine the distance.
It does however need a a medium to travel through - air is ideal although different temperatures and densities of air affect the accuracy of measurements. A vacuum such as space is not a valid medium for ultrasound to travel through.
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=8
Quote
In empty space, there is no air, and what we call "sound" is actually vibrations in the air. Now, like you've said, there are indeed light waves and radio waves in space, but these waves are not sound, but light. Light does not need air to travel, but then you don't hear it; you see it, or it is interpreted by your radio set and then translated into sound.
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

Thank god sound doesn't travel through a vacuum or we would be deafened by the sound from the Sun...at the very least.
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

Quote from: Oldjim
In a vacuum there is nothing to vibrate

"In space no one can hear you scream."
nanotm
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Re: Scientists at Dundee University have boldly gone where no man has gone before by

since all forms of energy are transmitted in wave form its only the interaction between molecules that differs, light can be bent or reflected as it changes between mediums (like air into water, or traverses through the atmosphere) sound waves change and loose energy as they move from medium to medium, the problem with sound as opposed to anything else is that it looses energy significantly faster, light waves loose energy at a slower rate but eventually dissipate (which is why the deep ocean isn't as well lit as the surface) sound waves loose energy so fast that a noise in the room next to you wont necessarily travel through the mediums in the wall as the energy is absorbed before it finishes (sound proofing) yet sound can be detected using a laser mic on a window from across the road where it couldn't be heard a few inches from the window, (because glass is a really strong insulator as its molecules are far less excitable than many other mediums at short wavelengths yet its exceptional at allowing the transmission of higher wavelengths such as visible light)
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you