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Scary figures

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,917
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Scary figures

1n 2010, 189,000 people were put into temporary accommodation, such as B&Bs, to prevent them becoming homeless, up 14 per cent on the previous year
Also last year, 44,160 people were accepted as homeless by councils and put into social housing, up 10 per cent on previous year
630,000 households are now classed as "overcrowded" as families are forced to share a dwindling number of properties
Source: Crisis
These figures are set to increase as the economy continues to decline, in  some other countries these  figures are even higher.
It Just takes the loss of a job or some personal item such as divorce or illness for any one of us to change from our current position and become one of the statistics above.
So if you have a roof over your head, food in your belly,  not up to your eyes in debt  and your health is ok then you are very fortunate.
9 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: Scary figures

Of course today's definition of overcrowding wasn't yesterdays.
I'm sure many older people here like myself can remember growing up with their parents and sharing the often rented house with their Granny.  Where three children in one bedroom wasn't overcrowded. If the beds fit in then there was room.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-09-2008

Re: Scary figures

In our hamlet of 7 houses there are 15 residents. According to the parish records the number of residents in 1940 was 71.
Ellis
Grafter
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Registered: 04-02-2011

Re: Scary figures

Seems rather high, even if you allow for evacuees.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: Scary figures

That rather depends on the occupancy - what today is 7 houses may well have housed 14 families
Community Veteran
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Scary figures

It does seem that the standard of 'overcrowding' has come down over the years. These days more and more people seem to think that over crowing means they don't have their own room, a big kitchen, huge living room etc. I'm living in a shoebox with my partner, we have so little floor space that even using the hoover is difficult (I'm serious) but we put up with it.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
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Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: Scary figures

Modernisation made things "worse" (not really) as most houses lost a room to make way for the indoor loo/bathroom.
As in my childhood house with the outdoor loo and the tin bath in the kitchen. As I remember it was "posher" than most of the neighbours baths as we had a plastic curtain around it. Smiley
But it really was luxury compared to the old woman that lived down the bottom of our long garden. In what would now be considered no more than a slightly oversized corrugated iron shed with a stove in it.
As crowded in as we were I still remember my parents taking in a lodger to help pay the rent. I also remember one day coming home from school to find him gone. It was only much later that I was told that he was found in the kitchen with his head in the gas oven. We never took in any more lodgers.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Scary figures

But going back to those times I do not recall being aware of many people sleeping out on park benches and in cardboard boxes.
Certainly true that the odd tramp slept in the local farmers barn but you must admit that in those days despite most people being poor people would help you out if they could but today that's almost gone.
Remember the elderly in those days, most families looked after their own but that no longer applies and we live in a different world.
What I am trying to get at is that in the past and in particular during the war years people stuck together and to know you have the support even if it's verbal support was valuable whereas today it seems it's every man for himself and if you fall on hard times you are on your own.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: Scary figures

That's true, people looked out for other people especially relatives. And a place was always found for those who needed it.
Houses may have been crowded by today's skewed standards but generally people got on and lived in harmony. Now even though we seem to have more personal space we feel more crowded.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-09-2008

Re: Scary figures

Quote from: Ellis
Seems rather high, even if you allow for evacuees.

When I was just starting school we used to have 10/12 folk living on our property:- 3 generations + other children of my Grandparents+ a couple (and child) who used to do odd jobs around the house & garden (they used to sleep in a what would be called today a "garden shed"), didn't seem that crowed at the time, everybody was out of the door by 7:30 (work or school, 6 days per week, seem to remember in the early years going to school on a Saturday, it was a 4 mile walk to school. Breakfast was a ‘help yourself affair’ normally from a large porridge pot if gran had fired up the range cooker, the left over porridge went into the bread, dinner was a boisterous affair around a large kitchen table............nowadays there are only 2 of us…………..when relatives or friends come to stay it definitely seems crowded.
(One of the bedrooms was converted to a bathroom in the 1960's, the outdoor loo became a 'garden shed' and the scullery became a dowstairs loo). Bath time was a tin tub infront of the kitchen range (in winter), once weekly on a rotation basis. 1st April onwards was a cold dip in the stone horse trough with a hand pump, or if you were lucky a bucket of hotwater from the Donkey boiler, I never knew what a shower was until I went to Uni Embarrassed