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Scams

Community Veteran
Posts: 1,571
Thanks: 3
Registered: 13-04-2007

Scams

I am a Home Watch Coordinator and have been for over 15 years we now get a newsletter and warnings by email. They are about local crime but some may cover the whole country like these ones.
I thought it may warn a few people of these two latest scams
Dear Coordinators,
Please be aware of the following that was forwarded to me by a colleague regarding a possible BT phone scam.  I am not aware of any occurring locally but it is something to bear in mind.
A man phones claiming to be calling from BT. He alleges that £20 - £30 is overdue for payment. When challenged by a statement that payment by standing order is in force, he replies that the standing order was not renewed properly. He goes on to state that, if the outstanding debt is not cleared immediately, the telephone line will be disconnected and that a reconnection charge of £75 will become payable. When challenged as to whether he really is calling from BT, he replies by asking that the telephone receiver be placed back in its cradle and picked up again after 10 seconds when the dialling tone will have disappeared. He states that removal of the dialling tone can only be performed by a BT centre.
In following this instruction the dialling tone certainly disappears - presumably because the person operating the scam has not disconnected at his end. On replacing the telephone receiver on its cradle, the man phones again to take debit card details to settle "the debt".
I have to confess that I fell for this scam - but, fortunately, my wife prompted me to phone BT who told me that there was nothing wrong with my account. I subsequently phoned the bank and had the transaction stopped and the debit card cancelled.

Please be aware of the below that has been raised by several Coordinators. Having done a bit of research into the below scam it is one that appears to have been doing the rounds for quite some time via email. The various sites that I have looked at all suggest that this is indeed a plausible scam. They do however warn that although it is plausible that the message may exaggerate the actual frequency of such scams. I can confirm that this has only ever been brought to my attention via a circular warning email and I am unaware of anyone who has been directly contacted over the phone in this manner.
Therefore as a general warning please be aware of the below email.
I have looked at the Visa website and they remind customers that 'Visa will never e-mail or telephone cardholders to ask for their account number or other card, personal or security details. You should never give your account, security or personal details in response to unsolicited communications claiming to be from any financial institution'.
Finally, the Visa website asks that if anyone is contacted directly that you refrain from giving any details and contact your card issuing bank to determine the validity of the call/email. Emails trying to gain your details can also be forwarded to phishing@visa.com for further investigation (please however don't forward them this circular warning email - only contact them if you are specifically targeted).


Please be aware of the latest credit card scam :-
This one is pretty slick since they provide Y O U with all the information, except the one piece they want.
Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it. This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & MasterCard Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.
One of our employees was called on Wednesday from "VISA", and I was called on Thursday from "MasterCard".
The scam works like this: Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank) did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for £497.99 from a Marketing company based in London ?" When you say "No", the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from £297 to £497, just under the £500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?"
You say "yes". The caller continues - "I will be starting a fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card (0800-VISA) and ask for Security.
You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. "Do you need me to read it again?"
Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works the caller then says, "I need to verify you are in possession of your card." He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers." There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?" After you say, "No," the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back if you do", and hangs up.
You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of £497.99 was charged to our card.
Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or MasterCard directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.
What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a "Jason Richardson of MasterCard" with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening .
13 REPLIES
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 10,583
Thanks: 191
Fixes: 9
Registered: 01-09-2007

Re: Scams

How does the second scam work?
You say
Quote
This one is pretty slick since they provide Y O U with all the information, except the one piece they want.
Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it.

Where do the scammers get your card number from?

amir852
Grafter
Posts: 98
Registered: 13-02-2009

Re: Scams

wen they cal u they ask u 4 ur credit/debit card to take the payments neva give if any 1 cal be wer e.g if they call from bt and ask u say no an call up bt
Community Veteran
Posts: 18,545
Thanks: 191
Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Scams

Thanks for the details Samuria.  Ther second scam has been doing the rounds for a long time and I read that a lot of people have been caught out by it.
StickyMick
Grafter
Posts: 325
Registered: 29-11-2008

Re: Scams

Quote from: The
Where do the scammers get your card number from?

Various sources. Skimming, hacking into online shop databases, i.e Amazon, Fleabay, Paypal, etc.
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 168
Fixes: 3
Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Scams

I've seen a lot of the fake potential transaction will be applied to your card, unless you 'verify' you card details scams (i.e. give the details to the scammers who then put a real transaction on it!) via spam mails.
I guess it's turning to phone calls now, as they realise the vast majority ignore spam Angry
I have caller ID on my landline and don't answer anything from where I don't recognise the number.
Not that my number is a secret, but only a handful of people know it anyway, and if it's not a call from them, then it's going to be someone I don't wish to speak to Smiley
However I need to start going through recruitment agencies soon, so that won't be an option (they're always withheld) Sad
techguy
Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: 12-09-2008

Re: Scams

Hi Samuria
Hate to say it and I know you are passing on in good faith but this reads like one of those hoax chain e-mails to me.
Visa and Mastercard operate networks that switch transactions between acquirers (banks and payment processors that provide services to businesses) and issuers so the fraud and security function is down to the issuing instution (American Express and Diners Club are the only firms that act as issuer, network and acquierer)
UK banks at least are starting to use automated telephone verification of transactions, the system will try the registered numbers on your card account and you will be asked in synthesised speech to confirm or deny transactions by pressing one or two after it reads out the date and amount.
Generally if I get phone calls from compnaies asking to verify info I tell them I will call the company to confirm the information as I do not divulge personal details on calls I did not originate.
skippyonspeed
Grafter
Posts: 46
Registered: 21-02-2009

Re: Scams

Never had the problem.......but if I did, I think I would make up a number.  If enough people did it they might give up trying!
techguy
Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: 12-09-2008

Re: Scams

Or you could always do the Fone Jacker (yes I know phone is incorrect but that is how it was spelt) type impression where he was buying a Bentley but pretended that his mobile kept cutting out while reading the numbers.
I would put a link but some of the material might not be suitable for readers of a sensitive disposition but if you google fone jacker I'm sure you'll come across the sketch I am referring to.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,571
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Registered: 13-04-2007

Re: Scams

Techguy
If you read the post I am a Home Watch Coordinator and this message comes directly from the Police themselves
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 168
Fixes: 3
Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Scams

I've seen enough false bulk e-mails, and the wording is suspect I admit. However, I can believe the scams to get the CVV from the credit card (that's 3 digit number on the signature strip).
May not seem important, but the companies clamped (if you can call it that) down on just having the card number and expiry date which people used to get from old credit card receipts. That's in the days before the recent machines asterisk out most of the numbers.
So you also need that to 'purchase' (or steal) things.
Hence, the phone calls trying all the psychological tricks in the book attempting to get you to part with it.
<bitter sarcasm>Still - if your card does have a couple of grand nicked off it, you can expect the police to take it seriously at least</bitter sarcasm>
198kHz
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 3,217
Thanks: 253
Fixes: 7
Registered: 30-07-2008

Re: Scams

Fair enough, Samuria, but a lot of 'warnings' are just as much hoaxes as the scams themselves, and I doubt the police are equipped to properly evaluate such things.
Only a couple of years ago BBC consumer programmes, and the police in local newspapers, were warning the public about the "horrendous phone bills" which would result if a cold call was received and one acted on the invitation to "press 9 for details". There was talk of being charged £20 or more per minute - shock horror! In reality the maximum on premium rates is £1·50 if memory serves, and it's technically not possible to be charged on an incoming call anyway.
It's a shame, but one has to be sceptical about the warnings as much as the scams in this age of instant communications.  Sad
Not young enough to know everything
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,914
Thanks: 168
Fixes: 3
Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Scams

Yes, 4Candels,
I fail to believe the police aren't 'equipped' to deal with such things, 'bothered' is probably a more appropriate word (and I can think of many more blunter terms than that).
I've seen a lot the outragous x per minute scam e-mails, and yes it's £1.50 per minute. Doesn't stop the TV companies from scamming us, as they have. You can't get charged for incoming calls, but I've been hit by my old nemesis .. reverese charged texts a few times.
Twice last year, and twice about 5 years prior. The great thing about those is, you can be charged £1.50+VAT per spam text you didn't ask for, and when you report it to the network they then treat you like an idiot and ask you to take it up with the person/company who stole the money in the first place!
I managed to get a five pound note after sending a really snotty (not my choice of word, but didn't want to break the swear filter) e-mail from one company.
techguy
Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: 12-09-2008

Re: Scams

Quote from: Samuria
Techguy
If you read the post I am a Home Watch Coordinator and this message comes directly from the Police themselves

Hi
I was not criticising you whatsoever, I was just stating what it reads like and my own experience of dealing with card firms.