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Scammers at it again

Alex
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,138
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Registered: ‎05-04-2007

Re: Scammers at it again

Yep Mav generally what I do.

Sometimes you can't though, so you have to accept withheld calls, as could be ligit or not. If you know it is not then ask for the customer service number of the company and say you'll call them back.

Then you can always say if I'm a customer, e-mail me as you know my details (but don't give them).

CLID can be spoffed, so it'll only be a matter of time before someone who has say for example BT or PlusNet numbers stored on their mobile or landlne and assume it is really them calling.
Jonpe
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Registered: ‎05-09-2016

Re: Scammers at it again

What I would like to know is how cold callers can time their calls to the exact time when you are just sitting down to have a meal.

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Scammers at it again

Between data breaches and companies selling your personal information to advertisers when you sign up for things, scamming is always going to be a problem. Irritatingly your data can end up on a website even if you've never signed up to it. For instance, if you share your "contacts" in your phone with Facebook, it will create a "shadow" account for every contact in your phone that isn't already on Facebook. So should one of those contacts ever sign up it'll already know their name, phone number, email address and physical address, as well as any other personal information stored in your contacts list when it was shared. Then if they're not on Facebook, but someone takes a picture at a party and uploads it, tagging them in the process, their name is now linked to an identifiable image and that data.

That's too much information for a private company to hold on any individual. And it's certainly too much information to hold on an individual that never signed up for it, when said company is based in the United States and under the thumb of their government and the numerous three letter agencies within it's borders. Especially when both private companies and government agencies have proven themselves to be completely inept at keeping private user data secure.

7up
Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎01-08-2007

Re: Scammers at it again


@Minivanman wrote:

@Steve

One better than that, I had call on my new number asking for the Mrs by her first name -- the day after I had paid BT to have it changed because of nuisance calls!


We had our old number changed because of constant nuisance calls for a previous person who'd had the number and run up some debts. Some of the debt collectors were arrogant, others were decent enough to remove the number from their database. After 5 years we'd got fed up of it so had the number changed.

It got three times worse! I kid you not, instead of one name being asked for we had three - every flaming day. That has at least now stopped pretty much unlike our old phone number but it was frustrating to say the least.

 

On another note i've just been called today on my mobile by "Pearl Advice Services" about an accident i've apparently had. Naturally she hung up after my mouthful but the number isn't valid when called back so clearly more scammers up to no good.

Remember not to say yes to anyone on the phone that you don't know! Stick with phrases such as "maybe", "I can", "thats better" etc as apparently the scammers are using your recording of the word "yes" to enter people into contracts verbally and then threatening legal action against folk who don't pay up. If anyone does ever get court papers put in a counter claim requesting an order from the judge to the applicant that forces them to expose how they got your details, contract approval and proof of identification etc - that'll completely stump them.

I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Alex
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,138
Thanks: 775
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Registered: ‎05-04-2007

Re: Scammers at it again

That's the problem with changing numbers, (with landlines or mobiles), It is likely you'll get a recycled number that someone had once before.

PAYG mobiles are probably the worst, as the operators are quick to cut SIM's off if you don't use them.

I remember taking out a new contract and getting strange texts when I hadn't given anyone that number. Showing my age here, but does anyone remember the days where calling a network which wasn't yours cost something like 30p per minute? So you had to be selective in who you called Smiley

So I had two contracts, one on my home network, one on another (T-Mobile I think). I found a cash-back place on the internet, where after the 12 months you get the line rental back. You paid something like £50 and get a rubbish phone (rather like what £50 would get you now really), and sent them the bills every 3 months.

Only risk you take is them going bust and you won't get the money. They did in the end but luckily for me I got my money back just before it happened. Although years back Carphone Warehouse did something similar (less of a risk) and I got a contract with 3. They had just started out and the reception was bad, the phone was a Motorola brick, the battery lasted about a picosecond (think of how bad modern phones are now, it was worse that that). Maybe they are better now.

Jonpe
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Re: Scammers at it again

Not just phone numbers, 'second hand' addresses can result in unwanted visits: https://www.metro.news/we-found-out-the-house-used-to-be-a-brothel-recalls-barbara-hulanicki/645051/

agedgopher
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Registered: ‎02-12-2016

Re: Scammers at it again

I may be on my own with this thought but I will try to get some support. .

How often are we phoned by a company that we deal with, or they claim to be that company and we are asked for personal information to identify that we are who we know that we are.

Surely if a company is phoning us for whatever reason the onus should fall on their shoulders to convince us that they are in fact who they are claiming to be.

I know that some energy companies issue a form of password system to augment the ID carried by the individual but that I believe is only available to some vulnerable customers.

My thoughts have been prompted by a phone call to my home stating that the individual was from my energy supplier and needed my meter readings. Given that I had recently been in phone contact with the company and had been advised that meter readings were required for billing on 21st July. The individual that phoned began to ask for address and postcode details which I refused to give and I terminated the call. I checked the number that they called from and it transpires that they are a meter reading company who are sub- contracted to my energy supplier. So the person who rang was lying. I have emailed the energy company but have yet to receive a response other than to say my email address is not logged in their system so they cannot reply. Imagine the conversation that has caused.

So just how secure can we be as regards incoming phone calls?

AlaricAdair
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Registered: ‎21-03-2011

Re: Scammers at it again

One of my Derbyshire phone numbers is a recycled number. It is an easy to remember number as in sssss xxxyyy where sssss is the Std code and x and y are repeated numbers. It used to be owned by a small software company who went bust, so we had a spell of debt collectors calling the number. They'd accept the number was no longer relevant, then sell the "debt" to another collector and the cycle would repeat.

Worse though is that the number is just one digit different (as in one position above on a numeric key pad) from a taxi firm in Dorsetshire. We still get phone calls at 2am from some drunken idiot trying to book a taxi. If they are polite we'll tell them they've dialled a wrong number. If they are stroppy we tell them the cab will arrive in half an hour.

Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
journeys
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Registered: ‎24-09-2008

Re: Scammers at it again


@Jonpe wrote:

What I would like to know is how cold callers can time their calls to the exact time when you are just sitting down to have a meal.


 

Not only cold callers, M-I-L has it down to a fine art.

 

@7up

 

wrote:- Remember not to say yes to anyone on the phone that you don't know! Stick with phrases such as "maybe", "I can", "thats better" etc as apparently the scammers are using your recording of the word "yes" to enter people into contracts verbally 

 

That is useful advice - thanks

 

 

Alex
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,138
Thanks: 775
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Registered: ‎05-04-2007

Re: Scammers at it again

It's difficult - yes we can all put our mobiles on silent and disconnect our landline. I did that once when I had been called multiple times every 10 minutes and had assumed they'd go away when I didn't answer it. It carried for a few hours and went away. You never know if someone really needs to talk to in the middle of the night.