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Quality goods

Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Quality goods

Are quality goods a thing of the past ?

Many people who have stuck with a brand of goods because they have had good service from that item such as lawnmowers, sat navs etc have been disappointed with the latest model which may have more functions than earlier models but turns out to be made of cheaper materials and does not last as long or may not even work in the first place.

Some thought that by paying more they would get something more reliable but looking at the feedback on Amazon the price does not seem to matter.

So is it possible to still get quality goods or are they a thing of the past ?

44 REPLIES
rongtw
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Re: Quality goods

Yes problem is if manufactures make a good product , that lasts there's not much chance for Resales .

so now its called Design Obsolescence  , It will break a few weeks after the Guarantee period   runs out  Roll eyes

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Re: Quality goods

This is similar to things getting smaller.

I always paid a bit more for kitchen rolls - tight rolled thick and fluffy.

What a change this week. Same as usual but now quite loose rolled and I could shoot peas through it.

It's now the same as supermarket economy brand.

My brother always buys top fancy brands while I tend to buy cheap. I'm still using an old washing machine while he's on his third for the same time scale.

Luzern
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Re: Quality goods


You're sure you hadn't bought the other kind of roll?Shocked

billnotben wrote:

[snip].

I always paid a bit more for kitchen rolls - tight rolled thick and fluffy.

What a change this week. Same as usual but now quite loose rolled and I could shoot peas through it.[/snip]

 

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
Luzern
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Re: Quality goods

My thoughts are never to buy on old memories of a brand. Brand names are saleable, so Fortnum and Mason could easily become a brand of Delboys Tat.

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: Quality goods

Hotpoint's a good example, once a good, British name (despite it's American beginnings as a General Electric product name for steam irons), then Indesit bought it, and the brands Hotpoint owned, out and turned it into utter junk, I have a 19 year old Hotpoint washer that works perfectly, I'd be amazed if a 19 month old modern equivalent would work, or even last, as well...

PowerLee
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Re: Quality goods

I find the same with forklifts, some designers just seem to want to make things more complicated for no real good reason / or just cheaper to produce.

 

Sometimes your lucky, the design team & factory get it right, keep all the good bits & make the newer truck even more reliable then the older design.

 

Other times im ordering more warranty return tags, filling in more product quality concern forms or carrying out field service campaigns.

 

 

RobPN
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Re: Quality goods


twocvbloke wrote:

Hotpoint's a good example, once a good, British name (despite it's American beginnings as a General Electric product name for steam irons), then Indesit bought it, and the brands Hotpoint owned, out and turned it into utter junk, I have a 19 year old Hotpoint washer that works perfectly, I'd be amazed if a 19 month old modern equivalent would work, or even last, as well...


 

About 17 years ago I had a 15-16 year old Hotpoint washer which was also in perfect working order which I replaced with a new Miele, and sold the Hotpoint for a small sum rather than scrap it.  The only reason the Hotpoint was in perfect working order at the time of sale was due to the number of parts I'd replaced since I'd had it from new.  Off the top of my head these included: 3-4 sets of carbon brushes; 3-4 drum bearings; 1 spider; 1-2 drive belts; 1-2 suspension dampers; possibly at least 1 internal hose, but can't be sure on that one.

That was  the second Hotpoint I'd bought new - the first one only lasted about 6-7 years ISTR.

So the Miele is now older than the Hotpoint, still going strong, and the only parts needing replacing so far have been a pair of suspension dampers at £25 for the pair.

My point being that IME Hotpoint was never 'up there' with the top brands.

 

Minivanman
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Re: Quality goods

Quality is still out there but not so easy to find especially when you see what look like identical articles at different prices which throws out the rule of thumb of getting what you pay for. Brand names were always a fair guide as was loyalty to (in our case at least) British made goods although to my mind the assumption that the glut of Chinese made stuff we now see is automatically rubbish no longer holds true.... or does it.

Lets not forget either that goods made years ago were necessarily high quality as I'm sure they were just as capable of producing garbage as they do today - although perhaps not quite so much of it.

Just assume everything is rubbish and you'll not be disappointed, Aldi here we come!  

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
Community Veteran
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Re: Quality goods

It is always the same when products are designed by marketers and financial controllers rather than engineers. The former group will arrange manufacture of the product as cheaply as possible to sell in high volume for a short term profit. The engineers will tend to design the product not to fail, but this usually makes production more expensive thus reducing "shareholder value".

Thus marketing executives/finance directors are much more likely to be on the Board of Directors.

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chuffchuff
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Re: Quality goods

"Planned obsolescence" is the actual catchphrase for it and surprisingly it has been with us since 1924 or thereabouts as this wiki  article clearly states, though I was always under the impression that Bosch were the first ones to build consumer goods with a predetermined lifespan.

Luzern
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Re: Quality goods

Let's get someSmiley philosophy in!Shocked

Does a phrase like  "quality goods" really have meaning? These are just two nouns juxtaposed. Neither adds to the meaning of the other. Quality needs something such as good, mediocre or bad. The phrase is a nonsense constructed by illiterate, or deceiving marketeers.

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: Quality goods

@Luzern

Whilst it's true those who market products using the word 'quality' often use it to deceive customers, the word 'quality' does have meaning.

Many of us have used the word, 'quality' when we have purchased goods that have met or exceeded our expectations.

We use other words to describe goods that do not meet our expectations but I am unable to give examples as they are banned on the forum.

Wink

Minivanman
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Re: Quality goods

@chuffchuff

I have always sworn by Bosch and have used their stuff for years and from what I can gather they are still in the hands of the original company - which makes a change these days but then the Germans are not so quick to sell on those brands and companies to others as we seem to be here in the UK.

As for planned obsolescence - and happy to be corrected, but one agent told me that the cheaper tools have plastic gears in them whereas the more expensive ones (ie: £100 plus for a drill) have metal - which would explain why you can pick up one those 'Workzone' ones from places like Aldi (via China?) for around £25.  A colleague of mine would buy bog standard el cheapo power tools, made sure it had at least a year's guarantee, made sure he kept the receipt and when they conked out as they often did he'd just take em' back and exchange it for a new one.

Other than that if not sure what brand to go for, clock what the professionals use.

 

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
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Re: Quality goods


Luzern wrote:

Does a phrase like  "quality goods" really have meaning? These are just two nouns juxtaposed. Neither adds to the meaning of the other. Quality needs something such as good, mediocre or bad. The phrase is a nonsense constructed by illiterate, or deceiving marketeers.

Agreed. The word 'Quality' needs quantifying.

Saying something is 'a quality object' conveys nothing.

Saying something is 'good quality' goes some way but unless it is in comparison with a standard, it's not complete.

 

quality
noun
noun: quality; plural noun: qualities
  1. 1.
    the standard of something as measured against other things of a similar kind; the degree of excellence of something.
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