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Prostate Cancer

Community Veteran
Posts: 9,563
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

Like several others on the forum I have annual PSA checks but I thought a much more accurate blood test was being introduced that would replace biopses.

Anyone have any info about that ?

Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎04-08-2009

Re: Prostate Cancer

@gleneagles

It's a urine test as detailed below. It's available now privately (about £470) but still too expensive for the NHS. Much more accurate than the PSA test though; only about 25% of men with raised PSA levels actually have cancer.

https://www.netdoctor.co.uk/procedures/surgical/a12037/better-tests-for-prostate-cancer/

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Prostate Cancer

Proton beam cancer treatment will be starting at Christie hospital this month.

 

The pioneering therapy to treat cancer will be used for the first time at an English hospital before Christmas.

The proton beam therapy, which targets tumours more precisely than current treatments, will be given at Manchester's The Christie.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-46442999

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-40295279

 

The Proton Beam Cyclotron is extremely large, and very impressive.

 

It is situated for several floors above the treatment room

 

(I was allowed a sneak peek soon after it was installed)

 

Proton Beam Cyclotron.jpg

 

  • This 90-ton power house is capable of accelerating a proton stream made up of ionized hydrogen gas to two-thirds the speed of light (over 100,000 miles per second).
  • The cyclotron needs to be very cold and uses superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium -269C and coils of copper wire 30km (almost 19 miles) long.
  • The building sits on 270 separate timber, steel or concrete posts driven into the ground to support the structure.
  • The total tonnage of concrete that will be used for the centre is 48,000 tonnes, the equivalent of two aircraft carriers.
  • The proton beam therapy power station provides enough energy to power the whole of Trafford Park.

 

 

Or just one Starship !!!

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Prostate Cancer

All men suspected of having prostate cancer should get £315 MRI tests, says NHS watchdog in move that could save thousands of lives and prevent unnecessary procedures.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6485585/All-men-suspected-having-prostate-cancer-315-MRI-...

 

I have regular MRI scans at both Wythenshawe Hospital (for the Christie) and also at the local mobile unit, which looks like an Antarctic Base with its' several large units all joined together !

 

Taken off Dashcam Video

Mobile MRI.jpg

Community Veteran
Posts: 2,961
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Registered: ‎04-08-2009

Re: Prostate Cancer

I had two MRI scans before my biopsy and prostatectomy, neither showed anything significant. The only things that were an indicator in my case was a rapidly rising PSA level and weird shading on an ultrasound. The PSA been steady at about 7 for a long time (three years) and suddenly shot up to 15, with accompanying blood. That exceeded the acceptable rate of PSA rise. A biopsy showed the worst.

Although the MRI scans didn't show much, when they got it out on the deck it was obvious that it was diseased. The surgeon showed me pic..  not too nice!

Community Veteran
Posts: 9,563
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

These tests are only reliable to a certain degree, you could have an enlarged prostate which may never become cancerous or the cancer could be of the type that grows so slow it would be wiser to leave well alone.

A neighbour of ours has a prostatectomy and oddly enough a year later his blood levels were showing a very low psa level, I never understood that unless what he had had was a partial prostatectomy ?

Quite possible to have a normal psa and no enlargement of the prostrate and still have prostrate cancer.

Equally these biopsies are hit and miss along with being quite unpleasant as some of you will know.

Far more money needs to go into research as in my opinion the present method of detecting prostate cancer is poor, sadly most men care far less about their health than women so it remains to be seen what level of priority it will get in the future.

Community Veteran
Posts: 2,961
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Registered: ‎04-08-2009

Re: Prostate Cancer

@gleneagles

The test in post 47 above is proving to be effective, more than any other I have read. 

If your neighbour has had the thing removed completely his PSA should be undetectable. I have six-monthly tests to keep an eye on it and it's been just that since the op. His surgeon/urology team should be keeping an eye on him though.

The normal biopsy is quite unreliable as you say because it can easily miss the effected area, because only a single "stab" is taken. I had something called a perineal "mapping" biopsy, available on the NHS, which involved sixty (yes, 60!) small pieces of tissue being removed and tested. It wasn't quite as bad as it sounds, but it certainly found the affected areas!

My actual op was a robotic-assisted keyhole surgery, which I was very pleased with, also available on the NHS. I was up and walking about within 24 hours. The effect of the anaesthetic lasted longer than the discomfort from the op.

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Prostate Cancer

Thanks for sharing, good to hear the results of the test & surgery.

 

The more we share, hopefully the more men will get their PSA tested.

 

 

wisty
Pro
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Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

I agree everyone should get PSA tested, but the process of deciding whether to do anything about what is found is probably more complex.

I had a PSA test in March 2017 as part of a panel of precautionary blood tests after getting pains in my arms and chest which turned out not to be cardiac.

The PSA result was 62 -  but I had absolutely no other symptoms related to the cancer. After MRI, Bone scans and a biopsy they decided it was T3 - outside the capsule and in the pelvic lymph nodes but had not spread further. 

I had six months of  hormone therapy to shrink things, then after further MRI scans a course (37 visits) of external beam radiotherapy which produced few side effects, and those have since worn off.

I am still on the hormone treatment (and will be until at least February 2020). That has a few side effects but nothing I can't live with. The latest PSA test came back as 0.2 and I am still completely symptomless.

Without the precautionary test - who knows!! But given that I am 70 and the 15 year survival rate for T3 is about 90%, I have few residual concerns.

 

 

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer and death rates have plummeted worldwide, study reveals.

 

Prostate cancer rates and deaths plummeted or became stable in 44 countries between 1980 and 2012, thanks to better screening, according to a new study.

About one in nine men are estimated to develop prostate cancer at some point in their lives, making it the third most common form of the disease in the US, and the second worldwide.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6877237/Prostate-cancer-rates-deaths-plummeted-worldwide-...

 

 

Two years on, My Latest Quarterly Check Shows No Sign Of PC, My PSA Remains Stable At 0.1ug/L

 

Annual Scans confirmation. (MRI, CT, X-Ray, X-Ray Bone Scan, Ultrasound,)

 

 

Minivanman
Seasoned Hero
Posts: 9,717
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Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Re: Prostate Cancer

Good news, :thumbsup:

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Prostate Cancer

Breakthrough in prostate cancer diagnosis as scientists discover 17 genes that radically increase chance of carriers developing the disease.

 

Dr Matthew Hobbs of Prostate Cancer UK, which helped fund the study, said the findings ‘could play a crucial role in reducing deaths from this disease’.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6965065/Scientists-discover-17-genes-increase-chance-carr...

Minivanman
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Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Re: Prostate Cancer

All good news, as is the publicity being given.

Here is Wales they are running a "Check Your Nuts" campaign which if it makes you smile serious though it is, it makes it work. :smiley:

 

IMG-20190416-WA0002.jpg

 

Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Prostate Cancer

Another NHS money saving scheme, which I totally disagree with.....

 

Thousands of prostate cancer patients to be spared from chemotherapy as health watchdog recommends 'active surveillance' for the first time.

However, this will be a continual worry for many so diagnosed.

 

Fortunately I experienced minimal side effects, from the Radiotherapy, treated within two weeks of PC being detected, which no longer trouble me.

 

Two years on, My Latest Quarterly Check Shows No Sign Of PC, My PSA Remains Stable At 0.1ug/L

 

Annual Scans confirmation. (MRI, CT, X-Ray, X-Ray Bone Scan, Ultrasound)

 

But then I didn't need chemotherapy, due to PC being caught extremely early.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-7010331/Men-spared-chemotherapy-NHS-adopts-active-surveil...

Minivanman
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Re: Prostate Cancer

Well I bow to your better knowledge not having had any real trouble apart from those midnight trips to the little room, but how is it not a good idea? 

Surely self awarenes and some responsibility for our own previously disregarded health is better tham leaving matters until serious concerns arise. As I have got older I have become more tuned into my own health and touch wood, I'm not that regular a visitor to our local medical centre - at least not of late anyway.

Pleased you are in as good health as you can be.  :thumbsup: