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Prostate Cancer

Community Veteran
Posts: 8,615
Thanks: 960
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

Like several others on the forum I have annual PSA checks but I thought a much more accurate blood test was being introduced that would replace biopses.

Anyone have any info about that ?

Community Veteran
Posts: 2,546
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Registered: ‎04-08-2009

Re: Prostate Cancer

@gleneagles

It's a urine test as detailed below. It's available now privately (about £470) but still too expensive for the NHS. Much more accurate than the PSA test though; only about 25% of men with raised PSA levels actually have cancer.

https://www.netdoctor.co.uk/procedures/surgical/a12037/better-tests-for-prostate-cancer/

Infinity
Seasoned Pro
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Registered: ‎19-06-2011

Re: Prostate Cancer

Proton beam cancer treatment will be starting at Christie hospital this month.

 

The pioneering therapy to treat cancer will be used for the first time at an English hospital before Christmas.

The proton beam therapy, which targets tumours more precisely than current treatments, will be given at Manchester's The Christie.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-46442999

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-40295279

 

The Proton Beam Cyclotron is extremely large, and very impressive.

 

It is situated for several floors above the treatment room

 

(I was allowed a sneak peek soon after it was installed)

 

Proton Beam Cyclotron.jpg

 

  • This 90-ton power house is capable of accelerating a proton stream made up of ionized hydrogen gas to two-thirds the speed of light (over 100,000 miles per second).
  • The cyclotron needs to be very cold and uses superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium -269C and coils of copper wire 30km (almost 19 miles) long.
  • The building sits on 270 separate timber, steel or concrete posts driven into the ground to support the structure.
  • The total tonnage of concrete that will be used for the centre is 48,000 tonnes, the equivalent of two aircraft carriers.
  • The proton beam therapy power station provides enough energy to power the whole of Trafford Park.

 

 

Or just one Starship !!!

Infinity
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 6,186
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Registered: ‎19-06-2011

Re: Prostate Cancer

All men suspected of having prostate cancer should get £315 MRI tests, says NHS watchdog in move that could save thousands of lives and prevent unnecessary procedures.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6485585/All-men-suspected-having-prostate-cancer-315-MRI-...

 

I have regular MRI scans at both Wythenshawe Hospital (for the Christie) and also at the local mobile unit, which looks like an Antarctic Base with its' several large units all joined together !

 

Taken off Dashcam Video

Mobile MRI.jpg

Community Veteran
Posts: 2,546
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Registered: ‎04-08-2009

Re: Prostate Cancer

I had two MRI scans before my biopsy and prostatectomy, neither showed anything significant. The only things that were an indicator in my case was a rapidly rising PSA level and weird shading on an ultrasound. The PSA been steady at about 7 for a long time (three years) and suddenly shot up to 15, with accompanying blood. That exceeded the acceptable rate of PSA rise. A biopsy showed the worst.

Although the MRI scans didn't show much, when they got it out on the deck it was obvious that it was diseased. The surgeon showed me pic..  not too nice!

Community Veteran
Posts: 8,615
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

These tests are only reliable to a certain degree, you could have an enlarged prostate which may never become cancerous or the cancer could be of the type that grows so slow it would be wiser to leave well alone.

A neighbour of ours has a prostatectomy and oddly enough a year later his blood levels were showing a very low psa level, I never understood that unless what he had had was a partial prostatectomy ?

Quite possible to have a normal psa and no enlargement of the prostrate and still have prostrate cancer.

Equally these biopsies are hit and miss along with being quite unpleasant as some of you will know.

Far more money needs to go into research as in my opinion the present method of detecting prostate cancer is poor, sadly most men care far less about their health than women so it remains to be seen what level of priority it will get in the future.

Community Veteran
Posts: 2,546
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Registered: ‎04-08-2009

Re: Prostate Cancer

@gleneagles

The test in post 47 above is proving to be effective, more than any other I have read. 

If your neighbour has had the thing removed completely his PSA should be undetectable. I have six-monthly tests to keep an eye on it and it's been just that since the op. His surgeon/urology team should be keeping an eye on him though.

The normal biopsy is quite unreliable as you say because it can easily miss the effected area, because only a single "stab" is taken. I had something called a perineal "mapping" biopsy, available on the NHS, which involved sixty (yes, 60!) small pieces of tissue being removed and tested. It wasn't quite as bad as it sounds, but it certainly found the affected areas!

My actual op was a robotic-assisted keyhole surgery, which I was very pleased with, also available on the NHS. I was up and walking about within 24 hours. The effect of the anaesthetic lasted longer than the discomfort from the op.

Infinity
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 6,186
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Registered: ‎19-06-2011

Re: Prostate Cancer

Thanks for sharing, good to hear the results of the test & surgery.

 

The more we share, hopefully the more men will get their PSA tested.