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Prostate Cancer

Infinity
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Posts: 5,685
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Registered: 19-06-2011

Prostate Cancer

A year ago, I was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the previous couple of years, as part of routine blood tests, it was noted that my PSA (Prostate Specific Antigens) levels were increasing.

For a person without PC, or an enlarged Prostate, these would normally be <4.5ug/L

 

Mine had slowly risen to 18ug/L

 

So my GP referred me to a Urologist at Wythenshawe Hospital, Greater Manchester.

Two days later, I was having a consultation with the Senior Consultant Urologist.

 

This was the start of a period of digital internal examinations, by various medical personnel, not painful, but uncomfortable, over a couple of weeks.

 

Culminating in a biopsy probe inserted, which has 12 sharp needles to take samples...... 

Again, not painful, but certainly noticeable !

 

No signs of Cancer at all....

 

However, an enlarged Prostate, which was affecting my ability to pee normally.

Flow rate tests confirmed this.

 

I then had a full body bone scan, a couple of MRI scans, various Ultrasound scans.

 

I was booked into Wythenshawe Hospital for a TURP procedure, Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate.

This involved an epidural injection into the spine, numbing my body below waist level.

 

The TURP procedure (Google it...) involved a long probe, inserted into the [-Censored-], with a camera and crocodile teeth like sample grabber, and Prostate cells remover.

 

After this painless procedure, removed cells were sent for analysis in the laboratory.

 

I was peeing normally again.....

 

 

 

 

At this point, pre cancerous cells were detected.

 

I was immediately referred to the world leading Christie Cancer Treatment Hospital in Manchester.

The next week, I was given a hormone injection by my GP, involving a long needle, and extremely painful injection into my lower abdomen.

 

Cancer cells latch onto Testosterone apparently.

The injection was to lower my Testosterone levels...... cue Hot Flushes !!

 

 

Again, within a week, I was booked into the Christie for a series of daily Radiotherapy sessions, 20 in all, spread over 4 weeks.

 

A totally painless procedure, each lasting only a few minutes.

 

 

This is my Senior Radiotherapist, with Radiotherapy Scanner, taken from Hospital Website

 

Hannah Scanner.jpg

The side arms extend around your body, it was like being inside a giant claw.

 

The scanner, not the Radiotherapist !!

 

The whole apparatus then revolves around your body....

Quite scary the first time

 

 

 

The only painful part was at the intial session,  ranging location marks were tattood onto my lower abdoment, just smal dots.

 

 

 

No side effects until the last week of treatment, when constipation kicked in.

 

 

 

 

This has been treated with laxatives, several tried, the one that works for me is Laxido.

My PSA level has reduced considerably, from 18ug/L+, to <0.1ug/L

 

Yes, that's less than 0.1ug/L

 

MY PSA Levels

PSA Levels.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A year on, I have just had several more scans, X-Rays, Full Body Bone Scan, and a couple of MRI scans

 

 

There is NO cancer anywhere in my body at all

 

Due to the fact that the pre cancerous cells were found extremely early on, as the result of another medical procedure, the prognosis is excellent.

 

I will receive annual scans, with quarterly PSA tests, but it looks like, as it was caught very early, I will be OK...

 

 

 

 

I have received excellent and expedient treatment at both Wythenshawe Hospital, and the Christie.

 

Everything has been fully explained throughout, all the staff from Consultants, down to Radiographers and other staff have been excellent.

 

It is a nice atmosphere at the Christie, I looked forwards to attending each day.

 

Car parking was just £1.50 per day !!

 

However, seeing other patients made me realise just how lucky I was with the early diagnosis & treatment, some were visibly in a far worse condition than I would ever hope to be.

 

And most were much older than myself, I was one of the lucky ones, Cancer caught early, treated early, with hopefully no recurrence

 

 

 

 

 

 

So I would urge any males over 50 to have their PSA levels tested, it is not necessarily an indication of Cancer, but also an enlarged Prostate.

 

 

I have received excellent immediate treatment at the UHSM trust Hospitals, all done on the NHS

 

I would recommend men over 50 Google Prostate Cancer

 

It could be a life saver

 

 

 

 

 

10 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 8,055
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

@Infinity

Thank you for the very detailed personal report on prostate cancer.

Fully agree all men should get checked out but unfortunately the PSA levels can be normal but cancer can be present, equally a high PSA level may indicate a benign enlargement of the postrate.

It is likely a more accurate test will be available in the future which will reduce the need for unnecessary biopsies.

The level of funding for research into prostate cancer is low but hopefully this will improve in the future.

 

Community Veteran
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Re: Prostate Cancer

Good to hear that you're doing well Infinity. With a radiographer like that i'm surprised your testosterone levels didn't skyrocket!!!

I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Infinity
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Posts: 5,685
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Registered: 19-06-2011

Re: Prostate Cancer


wrote:

@Infinity

Thank you for the very detailed personal report on prostate cancer.

Fully agree all men should get checked out but unfortunately the PSA levels can be normal but cancer can be present, equally a high PSA level may indicate a benign enlargement of the postrate.

It is likely a more accurate test will be available in the future which will reduce the need for unnecessary biopsies.

The level of funding for research into prostate cancer is low but hopefully this will improve in the future.

 


 

The best way to detect Cancer is by having an MRI scan,  it was offered throughout by the Consultants, no hesitation.

 

I have had quite a few in the last year...

Infinity
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Posts: 5,685
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Registered: 19-06-2011

Re: Prostate Cancer


wrote:

Good to hear that you're doing well Infinity. With a radiographer like that i'm surprised your testosterone levels didn't skyrocket!!!


 

She is amazing, she is far more beautiful than the photo suggests, and is a throroughtly nice & caring person.

 

She is in a pivotal role in the Department, and everyone says it couldn't run as well as it does, without her.

 

We got on extremely well, she would often seek me out whilst waiting, and we would have a private chat until my name was called.

 

She was also the lead in a new patient reporting system the Christie were trialling, which I took part in.....

 

Wouldn't you !

 

Thanks for your kind words @7up

 

Community Veteran
Posts: 3,226
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Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

Funny you said that @7up I have to admit I was thinking the same thing. Tongue

I have a family member with cancer, I don't want to go into detail, in case it upsets anyone. Not forum friendly.

All I can say it looked very bad at one point, but now it is looking a lot better. Thumbs Up

I just have to be an hospital escort and admire the views (and I don't just mean looking out of the window Tongue). Not else much else you can do. Sit there worried, watch BBC news on mute with subtitles in the waiting room. Reading a paper and when you're not really in the mood or taking it in.

But being serious for a change, to @Infinity that's good news and I hope it all goes well.

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Re: Prostate Cancer

My dad had an enlarged prostate in 1997. He was a stubborn man and refused to see a doctor for days but was getting more ill by the hour as he couldn't pee. Eventually we got a doctor out who sent him straight to Guys. His urine was infected and could have become septic which would probably have proved fatal. They drained this bladder and fitted a catheter. A few months later he had an operation so to remove the need for a catheter. They also did further tests which found he, too, had prostate cancer although the urologist said it was not agressive and he would probably die of old age before the cancer got him. He did have annual check-ups for a few years. He died 13 years later at the ripe old age of 90!

 

@Infinity Glad things have worked out well for you.

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Community Veteran
Posts: 8,055
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

No sure if you had this done as a NHS or private patient but my understanding is a considerable amount of time can elapse from when you see your GP get the psa results and wait to see a consultant let alone wait for a MRI scan if you are a NHS patient.

 

I accept services vary across the country in terms of how long you wait for treatment.

Infinity
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Posts: 5,685
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Re: Prostate Cancer

From initial diagnosis to Radiotherapy treatment was less than one month, all done within the NHS.

 

I have always found round here, using Hospitals in Manchester, referred from my GP in Derbyshire, that treatment for anything is usually very quick.

 

But then, Wythenshawe & Christie Hospitals are just about the best in the country.

As are the respective Consultants, and other medical staff.

 

And most of the time I was treated as an Out Patient, so no waiting for a ward bed.

 

 

Community Veteran
Posts: 3,226
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Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Prostate Cancer

We have to do bloods when we come in, first thing. We've got a green form, which means we get there quicker. It is kind of like a fast pass, otherwise it pretty much works as in you press a button and get a supermarket deli ticket with a number and wait. It works the same.

Thing that moved me a few appointments ago as there was a woman sitting opposite within the same department. Had no one with her, looked petrified and I could see it through her body language. I'm 40 and she looked around 25. Had a green form, and initially I thought she was holding it for someone else. I worked out after 10 minutes the form was for her and she had no-body else with with her.

It could have been her decision to go to the hospital alone, but if not I think it is unfair she didn't have a friend to help.

 

Infinity
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Posts: 5,685
Thanks: 170
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Registered: 19-06-2011

Re: Prostate Cancer

 

 

 

@Infinity wrote:

A year ago, I was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer.

 


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