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Praise for the NHS

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,154
Thanks: 54
Fixes: 2
Registered: 30-08-2007

Praise for the NHS

Yes, I know it's unfashionable, but I usually find the NHS emergency unit's, when it's necessary get it done smoothly, without a great deal of fuss, in a professional manner.
Because of my wife's disabilities and medical history, and that she can very rapidly deteriorate over a matter of hours, I'm obliged to call the emergency services maybe once or twice a year. Yesterday was such a day.
It was as usual, after midnight when I dialled 999, as my wife had gone from enjoying a family 50th wedding anniversary party, to a completely weakened state and unable to stand or raise her arms without considerable effort over around 4 hours.
The ambulance arrived under blue lights, within 3 minutes of the call (I followed in my car) she was booked in, seen by triage, and doctors, and discharged within 1.5 hours. It is not necessary to go into detail here of the nature of the emergency, just to say a heartfelt thank you. And this was Saturday night, with the usual round of drunks and fight cases cluttering A&E.
Well done the NHS.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
20 REPLIES
jmd
Grafter
Posts: 2,933
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

I hope that today she is feeling much better.....................

I am  pleased with service received here in a different way.  I have mentioned that I have hearing problems.  My NHS digital hearing aids that I had were not doing anything for me so I go an appointment with the local Audiologist.  I had a new hearing test and new aids which are lighter and marginally better.  Hearing aids are not very helpful to me as I do not hear anything at high/medium pitch and they just tend to amplify what I already hear. 
The audiologist after completing hearing test asked me if I had thought of a cochlear implant!  I said no, I thought they were for children, and nothing ever said before.  She thought I would fit criteria and would check.  I had to return last week for new earpieces - and after deaking with them - she said oh, you fit criteria - would you like to be referred?  So as I had looked up information on web previously, I said yes as nothing would be lost by investigating whether I would be suitable!  So have to see ENT Consultant as formality who will then refer me to Nottingham.  There are lots of tests involved, takes a while and may not be suitable in end but at least it is worth a try.  I thanked the audiologist for being so pro-active and ensuring that I know what is available.
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,154
Thanks: 54
Fixes: 2
Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

jmd, is your problem "menieres syndrome" by chance? which I have a fortunately mildish case of, it's very variable, from complete deafness to almost full hearing of my left ear. I also have a hearing aid, which I rarely use as, like you it amplifies the sounds I generally don't want to hear. driving with can literally be a pain. Oddly, I can be sitting in a restaurant, and can't hear my wife talking to me across the table, but can clearly hear the conversations going on at the tables around us. She of course, tells everybody this is "selective" deafness, but in fact it's very real and quite bizarre at times. The hearing aid has been re-tuned several times, and Ok for a while, but through no fault of the aid, the variability of my condition renders it pretty useless again until the next tune-up.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
jmd
Grafter
Posts: 2,933
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

No - it is not menieres syndrome.  It is because I had measles as a child which damaged the nerve hairs in cochlea. It probably limted my hearing for years but  I did not realise until I was in late 30s that I had a problem hearing, and I did not acknowledge it until I was in my 40s!  I fought against being classed as deaf - saying it was other people not speaking clearly.  Eventually I got an old style aid which I never wore.  Then I got my digital aids but found they did nothing for me so again did not use.  I lipread to some extent.  The phone is main problem - consonants are high pitch so I have difficulty in making out what people say.  Yes, some folk say it is selective deafness [I used to get that when I was at work as I could not hear the phone ring there!] but I would love to be able to hear more clearly.  I get annoyed when walking with friends and they say "oh listen to that bird sing" - and I cannot hear it at all! 
So, if I am suitable for cochlear implant and it gives me better hearing I will be very grateful to an audiologist.  It just makes me wonder if I was supposed to move to a different part of the country to get this service.
Incidentally, if anyone reading this has a cochlear implant - I wouldlove to hear from them!
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,571
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Registered: 13-04-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

Glad someone has some good experiences. Mu wife went in a couple of years ago for a simple Hernia op to be done under local and lasting 30 mins. She was overweight at the time and they gave her 10 MG Midzalom in one go it should have been give over 40 mins at 1-2 mg over 2 mins. They then gave her 900 mg of local when the max should be 600.
She was awake during the operation and screaming the place down in agony she said it was ten times worse that having a baby. Her heart then nearly stopped  due to the massive overdose. She told them she didnt want her knickers removing and they did that anyway when she was asleep which is sexual assault.
Its taken to years to get anywere but the GMC had the surgeon in their court for 5 days and found him guilt of 19 charges but ran out of time so he has to go back in April for a further 15 charges.
The main charge was he didnt have an anerthertist  but did it all himself and he gave a anesthetic which only lasted 30 mins when the operation went on for 2 hours  as soon as th eGMC investigated he did a runner to Shre lankera
James
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Posts: 21,036
Registered: 04-04-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

I feel your pain jmd.
I was born with hearing and vision problems.  Hearing wise, I have negative pressure within my inner ear, which has mainly been treated with sets of grommets.  As a result I have two heavily scarred ear drums and get regular ear infections and a number of perforations.  My hearings normally about 30% on normal, worse when I have an infection.  There isn't anything that they can actually do, and apparently it's going to deteriorate.
Eyesight wise, I can focus within about 6 feet.  I'm very shortsighted, I have asygmatism, fundal albinism, nystagmus, squint in right eye, there's too much pgment in my retina and my optic nerve is too small.  Referring to myself as half blind is easier and saves a number of blank looks Smiley
So if anyone has a couple of eyes and ears going, I'll be more than happy to take them off you Smiley
jmd
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Posts: 2,933
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

Jamesh - I am glad that you have employment with Plusnet that you enjoy with your vision/hearing problems and I assume that your colleagues have better tolerance than mine did!
Working on a computer with poor vision I know sounds odd, but as someone who worked with someone who was totally blind and did computer work I know that there are all sorts of aids that can assist.  And snce my colleague [and me] worked for DWP they bent over backwards to provide him with all sorts of help, constanting updating it too.  For me - it took 2 years to get amplifying phone - because deafness is the "hidden" disability.
James
Grafter
Posts: 21,036
Registered: 04-04-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

I think I find the hearing part the most frustrating.  Especially with mine fluctuating quite as often as it does.  You can go a long way without being able to see things properly (okay, walking around in the dark isn't that much fun, but anyway) but asking people to repeat themselves two or three times is extremely irritating.  I'm not very good in group discussion because I find it extremely difficult to focus on more than one conversation and get easily confused Smiley
Apparently it's not just because I'm blonde!
N/A

Re: Praise for the NHS

Also explains his forum username too - James.... Eh?
jmd
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Posts: 2,933
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

Well Jameseh you probably have the same fascinating conversations as I do at times................... sitting with friends in place with noise, discussing all sorts of things I join to find that they have moved on from that topic about 2 topics ago but it has taken me that long to work out what somebody said!  Said friends thankfully are used to this now - people who are not friends are not!
The phone is worst for me - that is why I hate call centres, to start I cannot tell which button to press, then I can't understand person responding - so I tell them I have hearing problem and they promptly drop their voice!  Because mine is high frequency loss I cannot distinguish some consonants so phone conversations get dificult. There is a limit to how often one ask ask someone to repeat themselves, so somethimes I say "yes" or "no" hoping I am making sense................................ Sad
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,154
Thanks: 54
Fixes: 2
Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

With all the limitations that jmd and Jameseh describe with their hearing problems, many of which I can associate with. But I find the most distressing at times is the isolating effect, of completely missing whole conversations, leaving you looking vacantly into space, while everybody else is enjoying themselves, usually at social gatherings. In a quiet room with only one or two other people I don't have too much difficulty, but if all start to talk at once, I again get isolated from the conversation.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
James
Grafter
Posts: 21,036
Registered: 04-04-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

To be honest, phonecalls are something that I don't have a problem with, unless people around me are talking loudly! Smiley
I know how you both feel.  I feel like I'm missing out and often worry that people think that I'm just being rude :/
jmd
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Posts: 2,933
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

I hope I get chance to meet you and have a chat on 25th April.  Don't worry about being rude - I gave up on that years ago!
James
Grafter
Posts: 21,036
Registered: 04-04-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

Don't say things like that, Shutter and Pierre might get jealous Wink
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Praise for the NHS

That Ok If james and Josie want to hide in the corners and exchange Sign language That OK with me, I will be up near Sky, Kyle of Lochalsh on holiday

PS back to the topic, just back from the local NHS hospital with wife, two years ago 9 time into emergency on blue light in one year with heart failure, now has a triple pacemaker - ICD with integral pacemaker / defibrulater fitted, just her yearly with consultant check up, Thursday of to St Barts Hospital in London to have the on board records interogated, once every 6 month trip, hope to transfer to the new Cardiac hospital in Basildon for the next check. Smiley