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Power sockets

Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎06-11-2014

Re: Power sockets

Odd that one LED bulb takes out the other two with it, I presume they're haloggen replacements running off a driver that cuts the power off from a fault condition, for me, they're just LED replacement bulbs in Bayonet or Edison Screw lamp sockets...

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Re: Power sockets

If you are responding to my post @twocvbloke only 1 LED bulb fails but it trips the RCD on the lighting circuit thus cutting off power to the rest of the bulbs.

I have to go through them all until I find the failed one.

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Community Veteran
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Re: Power sockets

Ah, I'm still used to the "old fashioned" ring mains where at most for the lighting, it's one switch for upstairs lights, one for down, and that's that (though this house has such fluffed up wiring, some circuits are on the wrong ring!), rather than radials which feed different sets of sockets & lights...

wotsup
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Re: Power sockets

@twocvbloke 

Fix my own domestic stuff all the time, including fitting new distribution board with MCB instead of cartridge fuses, sometime soon I may upgrade board to one with an RCBO on each circuit.  Also fix the boiler when it goes wrong, you don't need to be gas safe to mess with water or electric side, things get a bit dodgy when you do it for other people and get paid though..... rewired the central heating a few years ago to get rid of the birds-nest of wires stuffed into 7 choccy-block connectors into a proper 16 way terminal box with every terminal labelled and a proper drawing...the birds nest was done by a 'professional gas safe bloke'   I  know which one is preferable ... and safer.  A lot of these do called tradesmen should be wearing either a 10 gallon hat or a blue and white striped apron......

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Re: Power sockets


@wotsup wrote:

Also fix the boiler when it goes wrong, you don't need to be gas safe to mess with water or electric side


 

Thing is though, the Gas Safe racket states that it's not allowed to even open the boiler, against the law apparently, but I've yet to come across anyone who gives a stuff about that "law", same goes for Part P. electrical certification, if you're competent, use common sense and know what you are doing, there shoud be no problem, but thanks to the few who lack those three traits (which a lot of certified "pros" seem to), those laws exist to protect the stupid from wiping themselves out...

 

But that aside, I've had to patch up a failed rolled seam in the expansion tank with RTV gasket sealant (some american silicone goo made for sealing up leaky engines) as the "professional" Gas Safe, Baxi-approved "engineer" claimed the leak was "rain getting blown in through the flue", but instead of fixing the problem he replaced the previous, non-faulty diverter valve for the current one and botched the job, at the time claiming they were a common fault which must be only common with him (he didn't apply silicone grease to the shaft, resulting in premature failure, presumably hoping he could come back again multiple times to "fix" it, yeah, er, no, I'm doing it this time, PROPERLY!!!), he's an absolute danger and shouldn't be trading, but the Gas Safe racket allows him to... 😡

 

Engineer, pfft, he couldn't engineer himself out of a wet paper bag, doesn't deserve the title at all...

RobPN
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Re: Power sockets


@twocvbloke wrote:

 

And yes, I am indeed fixing my own boiler despite not being on the "Gas Safe" register which means I'm breaking an illogical law, pulling a plug and replacing a £13.40 water valve does not ncecessitate a £150-200 bill, dodgy mafia-style racket there that got put into law thanks to the few idiots who cleansed themselves from the genepool...


@twocvbloke 

AIUI you're renting, so wouldn't a boiler repair be the landlords responsibility, so no cost to you?  Huh

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Re: Power sockets


@RobPN wrote:

 

AIUI you're renting

 

Yep, but the landlord works through an agency, and the agency hires an utter pillock for an "engineer" despite complaints lodged against him, and I don't want him anywhere near this house ever again, plus we know the landlord is okay with my fixing things as & when as we had gotten to know them while they were cleaning out & redecorating the house back in 2013...

 

Not to mention we'd be waiting an age for the local cowboy to make his way here, and I can only stand having no central heating for so long, given it's winter and I have a finite supply of alternative heating appliances & fuel...

RobPN
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Re: Power sockets


@Strat wrote:

I have 2 groups of 3 LED bulbs in my living room.

When one of them died I had no idea which one it was because of the tripped RCD so...

Remove a bulb

Reset the fuse

Turn on the lights

If the lights stay on you have found the culprit

else repeat until you do.


@Strat 

Or you could remove all three of the lamps comprising one of the groups so you should then know which group of three contains the faulty lamp, which would narrow down the defective one slightly quicker.

Probably not a massive advantage for only six, maybe more worthwhile with a larger number.

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Re: Power sockets

Thanks @RobPN 😊

I was sort of expecting someone on here to detail a mathematical formula for finding the offending bulb in the most efficient way.

There's still time.

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idonno
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Re: Power sockets


@Strat wrote: 😊 I was sort of expecting someone on here to detail a mathematical formula

No need. Sod's law says it will always be the last one! 🤣

Ever helpful. :grin: Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
idonno
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Re: Power sockets

@wotsup Switch mode power supplies chop up the voltage


@Minivanman wrote: Crikey, are they still around?

Don't like to worry you but nigh on everything uses them. Even your desktop computer power supply will be one. Things have moved on from the chop them up rough brigade, althoiugh you can still buy them. You can get pure sine wave inverters etc which is as good as what comes out of the mains - and that can be pretty rough as well!

 

A lot of modern stuff will use a switch mode power supply, just for its efficiency.

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wotsup
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Re: Power sockets


@idonno wrote

Don't like to worry you but nigh on everything uses them. Even your desktop computer power supply will be one. Things have moved on from the chop them up rough brigade, althoiugh you can still buy them. You can get pure sine wave inverters etc which is as good as what comes out of the mains - and that can be pretty rough as well!


Switch mode DC to AC inverters chop up DC and then alter the mark-space ratio to replicate a sign wave,  but AC to DC SMPS chops up AC and then gives required output voltage by altering mark-space ratio - this still involves fast switching on and off of transistors, which because they are either fully conducting ( saturated ) or not switching at all ( blocking ) they dissipate very little heat, as do any transformer or inductor in the package, so do not need large heatsinks and can be made in very small packages. They do produce high frequency though,  which can radiate or conduct via wiring so good shielding required.  SMPS are very efficient and fairly cheap to make so are very widely used.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Minivanman
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Re: Power sockets

@idonno 

I guess (in fact I know) my brain is still stuck back in the days of BY127's, bridge rectifiers and when such things switch mode power supplies were the new kids on the block. You don't have to be out of the tech game long for it all to pass you by that's for sure.   

I still have my old AVO meter around somewhere - probably up in the loft covered and in dust. 

 

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Re: Power sockets


@Strat wrote:

I was sort of expecting someone on here to detail a mathematical formula for finding the offending bulb in the most efficient way.

There's still time.



Ask Captain Slow:

 

Mook
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Re: Power sockets

Not enough lights to justify the sums @Strat but I'd approach it this way.

Remove a bulb from each set, and turn power on, if the lights remain on then one of the two is at fault, so replace one back in to set A to see if it trips. If it does then the culprit is the one you've just tried.

However, if it doesn't trip then there's a one in three chance of the dead one being the other one you removed. You know the lights on set A are good so remove one of them and put it in to the empty slot on set B and test. If the lights remain on then it confirms that the duff bulb is the one you removed. But if the lights trip again then the bulb is good and it's a fifty / fifty on one of the others.