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Plumbing Water Pressure.

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Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Plumbing Water Pressure.

No problem with the water pressure on the cold taps but the pressure is poor on the hot water supply.

Not a big problem regarding the taps but the shower is a problem, we have put up with this for years but I was looking at the following item on,  www.showerpowerbooster.co.uk  and wondered if it would solve the problem ?

Certainly cheaper than having a new shower installed along with all the mess of retiling and of course a lot cheaper.

Some internet sites have recommended raising the height of the cold water tank but that is not a option open to us.

The current system is a standard open vented system with a hot water tank.

Any comments or opinions would be helpful.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@gleneagles My upstairs bathroom has the same problem and my plumber has also said the tank is too low in respect of the shower.

 

He has recommended various solutions but they generally mean installing electrics into a wall in the bathroom which is messy and expensive.

 

When I get home I will show him this device and ask if he's come across it.

 

I couldn't get your link to work. I think it needs /shop at the end.

 

.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@gleneagles

Yes it would be fine, but but but.....   What kind of temperature regulator have you got on the shower? It's probably a low pressure type. It would need replacing with a high pressure type, and you would also need to make sure that the cold feed to the shower is also boosted, otherwise you would end up with lots of hot from the pump and next to no cold because cold is fed from the cold head tank, and is therefore much lower pressure.

 

A way round this is to feed the cold from the mains, if it's currently gravity fed. In other words the two pressures must be the same, either both low gravity feed or both high, mains cold and boosted hot.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

If you have a tank fed feed, I can tell you a twin impeller pump works wonders on a shower. Only problem can be noise from the pump itself.

Never seen those that you have on the link but you're right. You do need a pump of sorts. You'll never go back to a dribble. 🙂    

Ever helpful. Grin Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

Thanks for the comments on this.

I will get this installed sometime next month.

What attracted me to this idea was that if this pump failed at least the shower would still work whereas some inbuilt pumps failing mean no shower at all.

The existing shower is fairly old so may have to replace it at some point in the future, I think some of these modern showers incorporate a system that ensures the water remains at the same tempature even if the water pressure changes due to someone turning on a tap.

Thanks again for comments.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

I have now purchased one of these units and again seeking the advice of others.

The unit can be fitted to either the 22mm hot water pipe that supplies the whole house or fitted to the 15mm pipe that feeds the shower.

Clearly I would get most benefit if it was fitted to the 15mm pipe but the flow from the hot water taps is not that good so there is a temptation to fit it to the 22mm pipe which brings me on to my question.

 

If fitted to the 22mm pipe will the pressure in the 15mm pipe be reduced to any extent compared to if the pump had been fitted there.

I do not want to be in a position where the pressure to the taps is increased at the expense of having little extra pressure at the shower.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@gleneagles

I doubt that there would be significant pressure loss to the shower hot supply if you fitted it to the 22mm pipe. But, did you check what the pressure is on the cold supply to the shower? If it's fed from the head tank (as I suspect it might well be, otherwise you would have noticed the following when using the shower) you will have a problem regulating the shower temperature. As I said above, you need to ensure that both hot and cold feeds to the shower are at the same pressure.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@nozzer

Thanks for that.

The cold water system is via a tank in the loft and the flow is good.

I take your point about the balance of pressure for both systems, the shower unit has been in for over 25 years so if I have problems caused by unbalanced pressure I may be forced to change the shower. I understand there are thermostatic units that prevent the water tempature from fluxuating by more than a few degrees if the water pressure changes should a tap be turned on.

I assume that would be the solution to the problem equally I could put a second pump on the cold water supply, it appears 2 pumps can be used on the same 12 volt transformer supplied with the unit.

Thanks again for your reply.

Smiley

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@gleneagles

Is there any reason why the hot water cylinder cannot be fed from the same cold-feed tank that is feeding the cold supply to the shower?  (I take it you are certain the cold supply to the shower is not the mains?).

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@RobPN

As you might have guessed I am not too clued up on plumbing issues....

We have a hot water tank, cold water tank and a tank for the central heating system, how the cold water is supplied to the shower I am not sure about, I suspect it could be direct from the mains due to the good pressure but am not sure.

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.

@gleneagles

Probably the simplest way to find out if your shower cold supply comes direct from the mains would be to do the following ...

Turn the mixer valve to fully cold and then turn the shower on and you should see your normal flow.

Turn off the house indoor stopcokc (intentionally misspelt to beat forum censor), whereby the cold shower should cease almost immediately (it may continue for a few seconds due to there being a 'head' of water in the highest cold pipes).

If the cold shower continues normally then it is fed from a header tank, but don't let it drain the tank as you may cause airlocks in the pipes!

 

Edit: typo

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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.


@RobPN wrote:

Is there any reason why the hot water cylinder cannot be fed from the same cold-feed tank that is feeding the cold supply to the shower?  .


It probably is already. The difference in pressure between hot and cold is usually down to losses incurred as the water goes through the hot water cylinder. To have a cold feed direct from the main and hot water fed from a loft tank risks contamination where the two meet (if the mains pressure was to fail).

Ever helpful. Grin Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
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Re: Plumbing Water Pressure.


@idonno wrote:.

.... To have a cold feed direct from the main and hot water fed from a loft tank risks contamination where the two meet (if the mains pressure was to fail).


@idonno

I agree, it might even be against the water byelaws to connect it that way, much like it's necessary to have a check-valve in the feed to an outside tap to which a hosepipe may be connected.  Having said that, it's not unheard of for shower mixers to have been incorrectly connected to the mains.  Wink