cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Plane Down in Hudson River

Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: ‎02-10-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Quote from: techguy
I suppose they'll have to look at how to better protect the engines from birdstrikes

And the company and individual that invents a system may make a fortune. How do you do it. ?
To allow the volume of air to enter the engine  to produce the required thrust  and at the same time protect against an object hitting it at a relative airflow of 100 to 500mph is an engineering challenge.
No simple piece of chicken wire fence that would break with a bird hitting it at 120 - 400 mph.
Engines are tested as part of their certification - to withstand such things - but no such process can protect against all such events.

Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 26,786
Thanks: 989
Fixes: 10
Registered: ‎10-04-2007

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Given the stories that circulate about engines being tested with frozen chickens being fired at them when they should have been thawed, and the reported temperatures at the time of this accident, I wonder if that is explanation of why yesterdays accident occurred?
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
   Why I have left Plusnet (warning: long post!)   
Broadband: Andrews & Arnold Home::1 (FTTC 80/20)
Line rental: Pulse 8 Home Line Rental (£14.40/month)
Mobile: iD mobile (£4/month)
Highlighted
Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: ‎12-09-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Hmm yes.
In order to try to get over my fear of flying I've been looking at the two newest aircraft models entering service (or due to be) the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the Airbus A380 as I'm looking to plan a holiday to New York
Was quite suprised to learn that planes can still be ordered with just two engines instead of four, I'd have thought it would be compulsory to have four for this kind of reason.
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: ‎02-10-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

I don't think that any birds that were frozen would be above ground level - do you Huh
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: ‎02-10-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Quote from: techguy

Was quite suprised to learn that planes can still be ordered with just two engines instead of four, I'd have thought it would be compulsory to have four for this kind of reason.

A few years ago - all transcontinental aircraft were either three or four engined.( Boeing 707/747, McDonald Douglas DC10, Lockheed Tristar ) Two engined aircraft going across the Atlantic - had to go the northern route - so they could land in Iceland, Greenland etc etc.
But two engined aircraft like the 767, 777 , Airbus A300 etxc etc do these routes.
But if you want a four engined aircraft - just book with an airline that uses the good old 747 or the airbus A340 / A380 like BA / Virgin etc
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 26,786
Thanks: 989
Fixes: 10
Registered: ‎10-04-2007

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Quote from: techguy
Hmm yes.
In order to try to get over my fear of flying I've been lookinjg at the two newest aircraft models entering service (or due to be) the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the Airbus A380 as I'm looking to plan a holiday to New York
Was quite suprised to learn that planes can still be ordered with just two engines instead of four, I'd have thought it would be compulsory to have four for this kind of reason.

Boeing had a bit of a struggle I seem to recall over the 777. Previously there were rules that disallowed twin engine aircraft from doing inter-continental flights.
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
   Why I have left Plusnet (warning: long post!)   
Broadband: Andrews & Arnold Home::1 (FTTC 80/20)
Line rental: Pulse 8 Home Line Rental (£14.40/month)
Mobile: iD mobile (£4/month)
Highlighted
Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: ‎12-09-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

I'll prob go Virgin or BA.
Prob Virgin as their Upper Class looks cheaper and I don't want to be stuck in an uncomfortable seat for 8 hours!
Highlighted
Grafter
Posts: 5,924
Thanks: 2
Registered: ‎07-04-2007

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

There's a lot of water from here to the USA so I suggest going cattle class and get a seat near the exit at the wings.  Grin
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: ‎02-10-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Quote from: jelv

Boeing had a bit of a struggle I seem to recall over the 777. Previously there were rules that disallowed twin engine aircraft from doing inter-continental flights.

Not intercontinental over land - but if it invloved hours over water
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: ‎02-10-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Given the millions of passengers have travelled by air across the Atlantic in the last 50 years - how many have died or been seriously injured Huh
perspective  Smiley Smiley
You are far more likely to be killed or hurt on the drive to the airport.
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,496
Thanks: 478
Registered: ‎12-08-2007

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Some years ago i was told that on the 2 engined aircraft if one engine goes down the plane can still fly on the remaining engine.  Don't know if one of our flying posters can throw any light on this.
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 26,786
Thanks: 989
Fixes: 10
Registered: ‎10-04-2007

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

I think the rules are stricter in that a there are rules about still being able to take off if an engine cuts out after the latest point when the take off could be aborted.
Edit: Some years ago there was a Jumbo took off from Gatwick which had two of it's engines blow out because of strong cross winds. It only just cleared the hill near Charlwood.
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
   Why I have left Plusnet (warning: long post!)   
Broadband: Andrews & Arnold Home::1 (FTTC 80/20)
Line rental: Pulse 8 Home Line Rental (£14.40/month)
Mobile: iD mobile (£4/month)
Highlighted
Grafter
Posts: 5,924
Thanks: 2
Registered: ‎07-04-2007

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

I've been averaging 20 flights per year for the last 14 years, approximately 60% short haul the rest long haul and I can only remember 2 occasions were turbulence was bad, and only lasted a few minutes. Perhaps that why I did well on this  Grin
Saying that I'm flying Tuesday and I'm a bit concerned as a lot of snow is forecasted at the airport that I'm landing at.
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: ‎02-10-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Yes - if that wasn't true they wouldn't be certified.
A two engined aircraft can continue to take off if one engine fails on take off, let alone in the climb or cruise.
Highlighted
Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: ‎12-09-2008

Re: Plane Down in Hudson River

Quote from: mal0z
Given the millions of passengers have travelled by air across the Atlantic in the last 50 years - how many have died or been seriously injured Huh
perspective  Smiley Smiley
You are far more likely to be killed or hurt on the drive to the airport.

I flew Ryanair from Luton to Dublin about 8 yeara ago (not sure of plane type but think it was a Boeing with 4 engines) and it was a white knuckle ride, pilot ran out of runway and took off practially vertically and struggled to level out and people were literally screaming in fear, got to Dublin and descent was again rather err, rapid.
Put it this way, I fell asleep in the car on the way to our destination (we were picked up by the neighbour of the family friend we went to stay with) as was exhausted after gripping my seat with fear.