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Pheasant "farming"

hadden
Grafter
Posts: 486
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Registered: 27-07-2007

Pheasant "farming"

This morning my work is once more disturbed by the sounds from the farm across the road from me.
Last year you could regularly see flocks of young pheasants wandering about the farm, close by the farm buildings, clearly being "farmed". Then from the autumn onwards, these pheasants are moved a couple of fields away and shot. Not in a controlled slaughterhouse like other farm stock, but in the open fields with shotguns.
The only reason is because some people think that killing animals = pleasure.
If these townies want to call it a "sport", give the pheasants the guns! One of the pheasants flew over just now and it doesn't look like it can defend itself.
However, the gunfire carries on...
7 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: Pheasant "farming"


Is this really just happening on open fields? Are the birds kept and restricted to those fields or is there woodland they can roam around which at least stops the shotgun holder have a clear line of sight?
If it is the former then it really is not a sport is it?
SW.
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: Pheasant "farming"

They are normally free to roam once they are out of the heated pens (these are only for the very young birds - and you see a lot of them with red 47kg propane bottles next to them) except the feeders are usually in a fenced area to stop foxes but of course the birds can fly over the top of the fence.
hadden
Grafter
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Registered: 27-07-2007

Re: Pheasant "farming"

In this case the estate is mostly open fields with some small groups of trees and some trees along field boundaries. However the shooters tend to stand in the open fields for the shooting not wander through the trees.
It's not like the folk need to trek miles of countryside "hunting". The just go to one of several fields, the birds take to the air and become targets.
Some pheasants do escape over the estate wall, but that may only be random wanderings rather than a planned escape route from the guns.
I'm not a vegetarian and do appreciate eating a varied diet (including pheasant).
However I get annoyed by folk who get their pleasure from the act of killing.
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Re: Pheasant "farming"

But haven't you heard John...it's all for the good of the countryside Roll eyes
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hadden
Grafter
Posts: 486
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Registered: 27-07-2007

Re: Pheasant "farming"

I think I may have heard that said once or twice  Tongue
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Re: Pheasant "farming"

I abhor killing in any shape or form, particularly when they can't be 100% sure that the creature will die instantly and may suffer a lingering death.  We have countryside near to where I live and just before Christmas there was a whole load of farming/country folk (all in 4x4s) shooting in the middle of the week. I had the impression that they were all poor and struggling to earn a living - it makes you wonder when they can spare the time for this activity.
As strat says, there can be no dialogue because we ordinary people don't understand the needs of the countryside and that it has gone on for centuries (or so they say).
Simon_M
Grafter
Posts: 684
Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Pheasant "farming"

It's not the act of killing that gives the pleasure, it's perfecting the skill required to hit a fast moving target.
It's the forerunner of the 'shoot-em-up' computer game, but with more fresh air & at least you can eat the end result.
The 'farmed' birds you describe are not considered proper sport by the purist - too fat & lazy (both the guns & the pheasants usually!).
It's considered very bad form to let a wounded bird die a lingering death. That's what the dogs are for - not to pick up the ones you kill; anyone can do that, but to retrieve any wounded birds.
Once any wild bird is born, it can die one of four ways. It can die of cold, starvation, being chased, killed & eaten by a predator (possibly your pussy cat) or being shot (& then eaten). Not much of a choice really, is it?
Still, it's better than being human - kept artificially alive long after you should have popped of, only to die a lingering death in an NHS hospital with all the relatives saying "What a shame he didn't die a quick death from a heart attack 5 years ago".
(ducks, to avoid the same fate as the pheasant  Smiley )