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Parking on Pavements

Champnet
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Re: Parking on Pavements

I remember back in the 50’s when you weren’t allowed to park on the road overnight.

My Dad kept the car in a lockup a couple of miles away. A trip in the car ? We had to catch the bus first....

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Re: Parking on Pavements

Then when you did park you had to clip your little light thingy to the top of your offside window.

Or have your sidelights on and risk a flat battery in the morning.

Minivanman
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Re: Parking on Pavements

@billnotben 

I had one of those lights.

Crikey we bought some useless stuff from Halford's back in the day. Stick on ashtrays, stick on car compass, stick on plastic flowers holder, stick on rear window heaters....  oh, and I had a "There's a Tiger in my Tank" sticker on the back bumper.

Nowadays we'd know just where to stick such things! 

And @Champnet are we even now entitled to park on the road overnight - or even during the day?

I'm not so sure we are to be honest... but somebody will know. :smiley:

Champnet
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Re: Parking on Pavements

Before the clip on things, when the rues were relaxed and we could park on the road, we had to have a hurricane lamp at the offside of the car.

Rules changed again and we had to replaced the hurricane lamp with one that was plain one side and red the other. As a youngster it was my job each night to fill the lamp with paraffin and light it...

Then came the clip on things followed by built in parking lights.

Minivanman
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Re: Parking on Pavements

Hurricane lamp?

How did you stop the horse wandering off. :cheesy: 

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Re: Parking on Pavements


@Champnet wrote:

I remember back in the 50’s when you weren’t allowed to park on the road overnight. first....


In our area very few drivers seem to know about this rule :-

Rule 248

You MUST NOT park on a road at night facing against the direction of the traffic flow unless in a recognised parking space.

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Minivanman
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Re: Parking on Pavements

... so if it's a recognised parking space (whatever that is) it's OK to park it the wrong way round?

Don't sound right.

Plus, and on checking that Highway Code, unless parked in a road with a speed limit great than 30mph, parking lights must be used. 

Well I never knew that.  :sad:

jgb
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Re: Parking on Pavements

Here are the relevant five Highway Code sections on parking at night:

248
You MUST NOT park on a road at night facing against the direction of the traffic flow unless in a recognised parking space. Laws CUR reg 101 & RVLR reg 24

249

All vehicles MUST display parking lights when parked on a road or a lay-by on a road with a speed limit greater than 30 mph (48 km/h).
Law RVLR reg 24

250

Cars, goods vehicles not exceeding 1525 kg unladen weight, invalid carriages, motorcycles and pedal cycles may be parked without lights on a road (or lay-by) with a speed limit of 30 mph (48 km/h) or less if they are

  • at least 10 metres (32 feet) away from any junction, close to the kerb and facing in the direction of the traffic flow
  • in a recognised parking place or lay-by.

Other vehicles and trailers, and all vehicles with projecting loads,MUST NOT be left on a road at night without lights.
Laws RVLR reg 24 & CUR reg 82(7)

251

Parking in fog. It is especially dangerous to park on the road in fog. If it is unavoidable, leave your parking lights or sidelights on.

252

Parking on hills. If you park on a hill you should

  • park close to the kerb and apply the handbrake firmly
  • select a forward gear and turn your steering wheel away from the kerb when facing uphill
  • select reverse gear and turn your steering wheel towards the kerb when facing downhill
  • use ‘park’ if your car has an automatic gearbox.
Luzern
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Re: Parking on Pavements

and from RAc

18 places you cannot park In addition to the points above, you must not stop or park in the following locations, except when forced to do so by stationary traffic: Near a school entrance (see specific section) Anywhere that would prevent access for emergency vehicles On a bus or tram stop, or a taxi rank On the approach to a level crossing Opposite or within 32 feet of a junction, except in an authorised parking bay Near the brow of a hill or humpback bridge Opposite a traffic island or another parked vehicle (if it causes an obstruction) Where you would force another vehicle to enter a tram lane Where the kerb has been lowered to help wheelchair and mobility vehicle users In front of an entrance to a property On a bend Where you would obstruct a cycle lane A tram or cycle lane during its period of operation A cycle track A pedestrian crossing, including the area marked by the zig-zag lines On the carriageway or the hard shoulder of a motorway (except in an emergency) Taxi bays (as directed by the upright signs and road markings) A road marked with central double white lines, even if a broken white line is on your side of the road, except for dropping off, picking up, loading or unloading except when forced to do so by stationary traffic: Near a school entrance (see specific section) Anywhere that would prevent access for emergency vehicles On a bus or tram stop, or a taxi rank On the approach to a level crossing Opposite or within 32 feet of a junction, except in an authorised parking bay Near the brow of a hill or humpback bridge Opposite a traffic island or another parked vehicle (if it causes an obstruction) Where you would force another vehicle to enter a tram lane Where the kerb has been lowered to help wheelchair and mobility vehicle users In front of an entrance to a property On a bend Where you would obstruct a cycle lane A tram or cycle lane during its period of operation A cycle track A pedestrian crossing, including the area marked by the zig-zag lines On the carriageway or the hard shoulder of a motorway (except in an emergency) Taxi bays (as directed by the upright signs and road markings) A road marked with central double white lines, even if a broken white line is on your side of the road, except for dropping off, picking up, loading or unloading

My one time now dead policeman relation used to say that any vehicle stationary on a highway can be considered an obstruction, whether or not the location is designated for parking. 

That would seem to give a sort of catch all for the police to use. All is by permission in reality.

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: Parking on Pavements

You have to remember some people cannot read or if they can read they add an additional rule to the highway code......

These rule apply to everybody else except to me.

RobPN
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Re: Parking on Pavements


@Luzern wrote:

and from RAc

18 places you cannot park In addition to the points above, you must not stop or park in the following locations, except when forced to do so by stationary traffic: Near a school entrance (see specific section) Anywhere that would prevent access for emergency vehicles On a bus or tram stop, or a taxi rank On the approach to a level crossing Opposite or within 32 feet of a junction, except in an authorised parking bay Near the brow of a hill or humpback bridge Opposite a traffic island or another parked vehicle (if it causes an obstruction) Where you would force another vehicle to enter a tram lane Where the kerb has been lowered to help wheelchair and mobility vehicle users In front of an entrance to a property On a bend Where you would obstruct a cycle lane A tram or cycle lane during its period of operation A cycle track A pedestrian crossing, including the area marked by the zig-zag lines On the carriageway or the hard shoulder of a motorway (except in an emergency) Taxi bays (as directed by the upright signs and road markings) A road marked with central double white lines, even if a broken white line is on your side of the road, except for dropping off, picking up, loading or unloading except when forced to do so by stationary traffic: Near a school entrance (see specific section) Anywhere that would prevent access for emergency vehicles On a bus or tram stop, or a taxi rank On the approach to a level crossing Opposite or within 32 feet of a junction, except in an authorised parking bay Near the brow of a hill or humpback bridge Opposite a traffic island or another parked vehicle (if it causes an obstruction) Where you would force another vehicle to enter a tram lane Where the kerb has been lowered to help wheelchair and mobility vehicle users In front of an entrance to a property On a bend Where you would obstruct a cycle lane A tram or cycle lane during its period of operation A cycle track A pedestrian crossing, including the area marked by the zig-zag lines On the carriageway or the hard shoulder of a motorway (except in an emergency) Taxi bays (as directed by the upright signs and road markings) A road marked with central double white lines, even if a broken white line is on your side of the road, except for dropping off, picking up, loading or unloading

@Luzern 

It's worth repeating that ... oh hang on, you already did!  :wink:  :thumbsup:

Minivanman
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Re: Parking on Pavements

All hail the free bus pass and down with private transport!

It's the future, and before we all get clogged up and choked out of existence.

You read it here first folks :thumbsup:

Luzern
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Re: Parking on Pavements

@RobPN  Inserting the text into the link didn't work properly; too indigestible for the forum software. Grin

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: Parking on Pavements

@7up wrote:

Only if you're blocking a vehicle from gaining access to the public highway - in other words, getting out.

If you're blocking an empty driveway and the resident can't get back onto their drive it's not obstruction, just a PITA.

I can confirm that. When we lived in London a neighbour decided it was ok for his visitors to park in front of our dropped kerb blocking us in because we also had visitors that had parked in front of his house (neighbour didn't own a car or have a dropped kerb). He rang the police who came round and told him to move his car as it was blocking our exit and that our visitors were legally parked in front of his house. After the car was moved we were told that if he had blocked us from driving into the drive then there was nothing the police could do.

 


@Minivanman wrote:

oh, and I had a "There's a Tiger in my Tank" sticker on the back bumper.


My dad's Ford Anglia would struggle as it got older with juddering as he drove off. He used to say "Tiger! I've got a bloody kangaroo in my tank":smiley:

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Minesapint
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Re: Parking on Pavements

My dad got "done" for parking his Ford Pop in the quiet cul-de-sac where we lived then without lights.

I think one of the neighbours dobbed him in, because dad used to park outside our house if he got there first, which would mean that the one neighbour couldn't park his car opposite without blocking the road.

The neighbour was a bit "entitled" I reckon.

 

I've still got one of those clip on parking lights somewhere here.