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Paracetamol

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Re: Paracetamol

I can give as good as I get Cool

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myredhotcar
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Re: Paracetamol

@ Mav: Has she tried any of the NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen)? This family can cause rebound headaches too but personally I find them less likely to than opiods and they are also non habit forming. They have their own set of risks and some people cannot take them.
After an operation I was given 60mg codeine 4 times a day and due to side effects I was switched to 500mg naproxen twice daily and I found this to be a superior painkiller. This may depend on the type of pain though. One downside was that toward the end of each dose period the naproxen did wear off somewhat. I assume this is due to the half-life and the fact that the codeine could be taken four times daily as opposed to twice daily. Not sure how they compare in large studies, in my case it's n=1.
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Re: Paracetamol

To be honest I can't remember what she has previously tried but there were quite a few including some prescription-only medications which she said made her feel to drowsy.
Although she can get the co codamol tablets over the counter she has them on prescription for 2x500mg tablets 4 times a day but she refuses to take more than 6!

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ffox
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Re: Paracetamol

I have lumbar stenosis and was on naproxen for over 3 years.  It was very effective.  Then some frightening statistics emerged - this a quote from www.drugs.com:
"Upper GI ulcers, gross bleeding, or perforation caused by NSAIDs occur in approximately 1% of patients treated for 3 to 6 months, and in about 2% to 4% of patients treated for one year. These trends continue with longer duration of use, increasing the likelihood of developing a serious GI event at some time during the course of therapy."
My GP immediately pulled me off them and now I'm on co-codamol which is nowhere near as good a pain killer but obviously much safer.
Anonymous
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Re: Paracetamol

Quote from: Mav
Good job it wasn't a spider!

The chap in the bed opposite had necrotising fasciitis, not contagious, but he has a pump clicking away continuously clearing out infection in his leg.
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I'm giving my cat a good deal more respect..

Any Minor Injuries nurse will tell you that cat bites are bad news in terms of infection.

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nanotm
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Re: Paracetamol

Quote from: ffox
I have lumbar stenosis and was on naproxen for over 3 years.  It was very effective.  Then some frightening statistics emerged - this a quote from www.drugs.com:
"Upper GI ulcers, gross bleeding, or perforation caused by NSAIDs occur in approximately 1% of patients treated for 3 to 6 months, and in about 2% to 4% of patients treated for one year. These trends continue with longer duration of use, increasing the likelihood of developing a serious GI event at some time during the course of therapy."
My GP immediately pulled me off them and now I'm on co-codamol which is nowhere near as good a pain killer but obviously much safer.

that's why they are often prescribed with things like lanzoprazol or omeprezerol to prevent the problems from occurring, diclofenic sodium though often causes such problems far more often and as with all medications there can be deadly results if you consume certain food stuffs alongside them (balsamic vinegar being one such item)
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
myredhotcar
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Re: Paracetamol

@ ffox: I would be interested to the findings of the study with regard to longer-term use as the percentage of affected people appears to at least double every 6 months. Proton pump inhibitor drugs do offset some of the risk (as nanotm pointed out). The NSAIDs can also raise the risk of heart problems but naproxen is considered one of the less risky in this respect (or at least was). Ibuprofen itself carries all these risks and most drugs have side-effects. Paracetemol has a massive list (because it is commonly used in part and has been for a relatively long period) opiates and opiods have their own set of risks and side-effects, and so on.
@ nanotm: Balsamic vinegar is perfectly safe to eat with NSAID drugs. Grapefruit juice interacts with a fair few drugs but you are thinking of the MAOIs which is an anti-depressant class. There are also emerging studies which question the validity or severity of these interactions.
edit: grammar
nanotm
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Re: Paracetamol

apologies' I should of better worded that, I was using balsamic as an example of the deadly effects of certain foodstuffs with different medications,
seeing you mention grapefruit juice reminds me of a drug called terfenadine  some years back that induced cardiac arrest in more than a few people who were otherwise quite healthy when combined with grapefruit....
I'm more sceptical of "new studies" that find something different in lab tests, especially when reading that such studies are conducted at the behest of the pharmaceutical companies and not by a public body with no vested interest in the results, but I guess that's life
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Paracetamol

As mentioned above, my use of Paracetamol has diminished now to the point of perhaps once a week I take a couple of tablets.
For instant relief from any twinges, I have found that Tesco Deep Heat Rub is excellent, and the best of all the ones I have tried.
An application of a very small amount to the joint works wonders, and the effect lasts ages.
The Paracetamol takes perhaps 30 minutes to have any effect on pain relief.
It's good to get away from using Paracetamol, even with the reassurances I have received
myredhotcar
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Re: Paracetamol

Quote from: nanotm
apologies' I should of better worded that, I was using balsamic as an example of the deadly effects of certain foodstuffs with different medications,
seeing you mention grapefruit juice reminds me of a drug called terfenadine  some years back that induced cardiac arrest in more than a few people who were otherwise quite healthy when combined with grapefruit....
I'm more sceptical of "new studies" that find something different in lab tests, especially when reading that such studies are conducted at the behest of the pharmaceutical companies and not by a public body with no vested interest in the results, but I guess that's life

NP, I clearly missed your point. With regard to new studies you do realise this is how science works, right? Anyhow, here is the abstract.
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Re: Paracetamol

I was taking an MAOI along with a tricyclic back in the mid-eighties for a year (but not for depression) and was vary aware of the dietary restrictions. It didn't become a major issue and was relatively easy to manage.
One of the MOAIs I was on has seen been withdrawn in the UK.

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myredhotcar
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Re: Paracetamol

I think a lot of people see MAOIs as having intrinsic value in treating depression (especially atypical) and other disorders. Currently there is a lot of focus on SSRIs, SNRIs, NRIs and other classes. A lot of MAOIs aren't used much due to the tyramine interactions which is why studies are looking into the dangers.
TCAs (such as amitriptyline) are often used as part of a strategy to manage chronic pain, but tend to cause a dry mouth at night which is deleterious to dental health. All classes have their own lists of side-effects (sexual dysfunction being an example for many SSRI drugs, and suicidal ideation can be an issue too, especially with the under 18s).
One drug was dubbed the "lemming pill" back in the 90s; I can't remember if this was Prozac (fluoxetine) or Seroxat (paroxetine).
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Re: Paracetamol

I think it was seroxat.

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Re: Paracetamol

Every drug on the market, excluding replacement therapy such as insulin has side effects and the use of drugs has to be balanced against the benefit the drug will do.
Added to the problem is that drugs affect people in different ways and despite extensive and expensive trials it may be years later that problems emerge from causing addiction to parkinson's which may be irreversible.
There has been a lot of over prescribing in the past so it pays to do the research before taking anything and only taking it if you really need it.
nanotm
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Re: Paracetamol

otoh there are drugs that never get out of the trial phase because despite being a kill or cure to a patient that's going to die anyway they kill more than 1 in 1000, my son when he had meningitis as a baby was definitely going to die but there was an option to use a trial drug that might kill him or leave him deaf, it took micro seconds for me and the other half to ask for the consent forms to use it, it worked and he was left with a minor hearing problem that seems to have diminished as he's gotten older, a year later the trial was halted because to many people were left with some more serious side effects or died anyway (although the autopsies couldn't prove if it was the drug or the illness that caused the deaths) but given that it was a hail Mary pass or it wasn't in our minds at least it was worth a shot, and clearly it was to the others who used it then complained about the problems it caused.... that drug should of remained a viable option (currently there is nothing like it on the market) and similarly with various other 50/50 type drugs they need careful control by doctors but should of remained as an option of last resort only to be administered when death was certain without it...
sometimes the problem with stuff like that isn't myth based but is down to compensation seekers who campaign after it didn't give them back the perfectly healthy loved one to get it banned, the same people who grasped at that straw and are not happy that it worked to some extent (the loved one didn't die) but then again that's a tiny part of a much bigger problem with the culture of suing for everything from a paper cut to accidental death .....
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you