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Organ Donations

Community Veteran
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Organ Donations

The government are planning to change the law so it is assumed that in the event of death you will donate your organs unless you have opted out.

Whilst I can see why they have done this could it be counter productive, it's one thing asking people to opt into something and I suspect most would in this case but to impose something like this on people and in this case I am thinking of relatives who the authorities may have problems in contacting or elderly relatives confused by the issue is it a wise move.

Should the current arrangements of opting in be left as they are.

11 REPLIES
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Re: Organ Donations

This seems to have been an on-going plan for some time:

 

Presumed Consent to Organ Donation 2008

 

Organ Donation 2010

 

Organ donation 2013

 

Donate an Organ 2014

 

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Re: Organ Donations

If this was brought into law,.... that... as soon as the person is officially pronounced deceased.  organs can be removed from the body for transplant. Relatives will have no say in the matter.

There will, I hope, be some "safeguard procedures"... like having three docs declare that life is extinct... and this should be done over a short period of time... ( say 1 hour between each doc`s diagnosis)..  and in an "independent manner"... so that the other two are not present..

All sorts of complications can arise. with it being "law"... e.g.  someone needing a transplant, of "X" part  and someone is close to death, that has compatible "X" part available but has an unknown time before demise... would there be pressure to "hurry him/her up"..  ? ?   and therefore save medical time and free up another bed for the benefit of the recipient? 

I am sure that the Medical Profession, in the form of the GMC or whatever body supervises this kind of thing, would look very carefully at all the ethics and legal implications, before allowing such a law to be enacted.

Currently, the system has this "line" that has been drawn....and it seems to be working very well, ( usually ) although, it does have it`s shortfalls in the number of donors and organs available,  which is the point of having the change to the law... so that the number of organs available will be much greater, and surgeons will be able to perform life saving operations much more quickly, and hopefully more efficiently, and successfully.

 

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Re: Organ Donations

I may be a Subject of the Crown, but my body is not owned by the Crown. On the first day of presumed consent I'll be joining the register of non-consent. I don't want my relatives to be faced with... "Can we switch him off yet? We've got a list of people waiting on scheduled operations."

 

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Re: Organ Donations

If anyone is already registered or planning to register then there is no real difference to them. It mainly effects those who haven't made their choice or have decided not to register.

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Re: Organ Donations

@Mav

I think there are so few people who have registered compared with the number of people who require a transplant that the government see this as a quick & easy way to deal with the matter but it could be counter productive.

AA raises a good point in who does a body belong to ? Without being too morbid should it not be the nearest relative and it should be for them to decide unless the person has already made their wishes known ?

@shutter

You raise some valid points and in particular about safeguards.

On a more general note some liver transplants have been carried out on alcoholics and others who have simply carried on drinking and that raises moral issues against the need to do transplants by medical teams who cannot refuse treatment on moral grounds.

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Re: Organ Donations

It may seem far fetched but if this goes ahead how long before some potential needed donors have convenient fatal accidents.

Jonpe
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Re: Organ Donations

Unless it's your identical twin you are unlikely to know who is a good match.

I carry a donor card, but I think it's wrong that, although I'm an adult, my next-of-kin or nearest relative has the final say.

The reason I carry a donor card (and used to give blood) is that should I ever need a donor organ (or a blood transfusion), I'd like this to be available.  If I'm not prepared to help others, I don't think I have the right to expect others to help me.

There are quite a few people who derive comfort from knowing that their deceased loved one has been able to help so many people after their death.

On a more light-hearted note, there are people, especially in America (where else?), who claim their personality has changed after a transplant, and they have become more like their donor; for example a woman with no interest in sport mysteriously developed an interest in football, which she later discovered that her donor also had.

rongtw
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Re: Organ Donations

I believe the new system will be better , unfortunately there are too many on waiting lists .

Opt out has to be the way forward

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Mayfly
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Re: Organ Donations

I used to be against organ donation in respect I didn't think I would cope with knowing part of my husband was walking around in someone else.

I then had a talk with my husband who is a donor and I promised to respect his decision should the need ever arise. The more I thought about it the more I realised that actually I would be very honoured to think that he could possibly ease the heartache of another family and became a donor myself.

Jonpe
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Re: Organ Donations

@Mayfly  Yes, it is important to discuss these things.  From time to time there are stories in the news about terminally ill children who have made it clear to their parents that they want to be donors.  This makes it a lot easier for the parents to make a decision when the dreadful day comes.  Transplant coordinators in hospitals have the delicate task of encouraging grieving relatives to think about organ donation while the organs are still viable, while at the same time not appearing like vultures.

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Re: Organ Donations

I have had lunch today with some doctors from the University of Valencia and we discussed the opt out option.

 

Here in Spain they have followed the opt out option for around 10 years and in that time the number of donors has fallen. It is thought the reason for this is that people are against automatic opt in and therefore signing forms against it.

 

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