cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Openreach Tools.

Highlighted
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 29,610
Thanks: 3,067
Fixes: 458
Registered: ‎14-04-2007

Openreach Tools.

My Daughter had a new master socket fitted the other day and it had to be fitted beside the old one which required more holes to be made in the plaster and brickwork.

I was in the room all the time and never heard holes being drilled or any power tool being used but there was brick dust when he left.

So I was left wondering what he used to make the holes for the plugs and screws.

Any ideas?

Customer and Forum Moderator. Windows 10 Firefox 79.0 (64-bit)

16 REPLIES 16
Highlighted
Pro
Posts: 297
Thanks: 198
Registered: ‎10-11-2015

Re: Openreach Tools.

Nothing I know of.

A quiet drill with hammer turned off, sharp bit, and soft brick would be my guess.

 

Highlighted
Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: Openreach Tools.

Did you hear him banging he may have used a Rawlplug  tool with a 10s bit

I still use one for holes in breeze block walls very easy to use and when the bit gets worn you get a good fixing

Devil of a job to replace the bit if it breaks off without the proper tool

Anyone else remember these

 

Image result for picture of a rawlplug tool and bit

 

Brian A

 

Highlighted
Pro
Posts: 297
Thanks: 198
Registered: ‎10-11-2015

Re: Openreach Tools.

@Anonymous 

Could well be.

I remember only too well! I remember drilling lots of holes with one of those in hard engineering brick, and having the blisters to prove it.

Still got some in a tin in the workshop.

A masonry nail of the right size works as an extractor.

I saw a set somewhere not so long back, with some plugs, and a version of that tool. 

 

And they did a hand powered drill for those bits as well. I've seen them, but never used them.

http://trowelcollector.blogspot.com/2016/09/hand-powered-masonry-drills.html

 

Highlighted
Aspiring Champion
Posts: 1,201
Thanks: 386
Fixes: 6
Registered: ‎22-10-2015

Re: Openreach Tools.


@Anonymous wrote:Anyone else remember these

Remember them well during my apprenticeship at the training school but fortunately the sparkies I worked with, out in the real world, had gone modern. They had electric drills and things like the Hilti cartridge gun 

 

Both the rawlplug tool and cartridge gun were wicked devices really. If it wasn't the hand getting walloped by the hammer as you hit the tool head (always have the palm hammer side - doesn't hurt so much if you miss!), you then had to select the correct cartridge when using the gun. Too weak and it wouldn't go through, too strong and it was possible to drive the fixing right on through and out the other side.

Ever helpful. Grin Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 20,030
Thanks: 2,724
Fixes: 40
Registered: ‎06-11-2007

Re: Openreach Tools.

@Strat  He could have had a baccy tin full of "brick bees"..also known as Masonry Bees. or even termites... well trained... they would bore the holes, and then be put back in the tin for the next job. brick bee.jpeg

 

brick bee.jpg

Highlighted
Pro
Posts: 297
Thanks: 198
Registered: ‎10-11-2015

Re: Openreach Tools.

@shutter  Unlikely I'd have thought.

I mean where would you get a baccy tin these days? Grin

Highlighted
Aspiring Legend
Posts: 11,769
Thanks: 3,859
Fixes: 1
Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Re: Openreach Tools.

@Strat 

Are you sure they were not just fixing to plasterboard, it certainly sounds likes it

@Anonymous 

I remember those rawlplug tools very well. Not much good for walls unless you were fixing in between brickwork and as somebody mentioned, hit an engineering brick and you'd have a near impossible job on your hands. Once masonary bits and electric drills became as common as muck household items such tools seemed to disappear overnight.

As for concrete back in the 60s we used 'redheads' and they were hammered in by hand as well - but you really needed to give it some welly!

Strange how fixing have changed as building construction has altered but even so, that rawlplug tool great as you say for those block walls.

 

Highlighted
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 29,610
Thanks: 3,067
Fixes: 458
Registered: ‎14-04-2007

Re: Openreach Tools.

No plasterboard and as mentioned above a small pile of red brick dust below the socket.

 

When the guys installed my double glazing they used fastenings that were a combined drill and screw but the tool used to insert them made quite a noise.

I wondered if it could be something like that.

Customer and Forum Moderator. Windows 10 Firefox 79.0 (64-bit)

Highlighted
Pro
Posts: 297
Thanks: 198
Registered: ‎10-11-2015

Re: Openreach Tools.

@Strat 

Were the fixings used masonry fixings or fixings for the UPVC itself? Assuming they are UPVC of course.

Because AFAIK, self drilling fixings are mostly used for metal or plastic. You can get "concrete screws" which are basically self tappers for masonry, and don't require plugs, but you still have to drill a hole.

"Noisy power tools" will be either the SDS drills used these days for drilling masonry, or the "impact driver" used to put the screws in.

Highlighted
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 29,610
Thanks: 3,067
Fixes: 458
Registered: ‎14-04-2007

Re: Openreach Tools.

For the uPVC windows and doors they used masonry fixings with a countersunk head and a hexagon hole requiring a hexagon drive in the drill. They went in in one go and no 'pilot hole' was drilled prior to this.

As far as the Openreach socket is concerned, without dissembling the socket I can't see the fixings....much as I'd like too.

Customer and Forum Moderator. Windows 10 Firefox 79.0 (64-bit)

Highlighted
Champion
Posts: 854
Thanks: 523
Fixes: 1
Registered: ‎26-01-2019

Re: Openreach Tools.

@Strat They didnt just glue it to the wall and sprinkle some brick dust around just to fool you did theyCrazy3

Highlighted
Pro
Posts: 297
Thanks: 198
Registered: ‎10-11-2015

Re: Openreach Tools.

Not seen those.

TBH I haven't used any concrete screws though. For the odd occasion I need anything like that I go the old fashioned way, plugs and screws or frame fixings.

There's new and better (sometimes) stuff coming out all the time though.

Highlighted
Community Veteran
Posts: 20,030
Thanks: 2,724
Fixes: 40
Registered: ‎06-11-2007

Re: Openreach Tools.

Over the years, I have done many a DIY shelf fix job, in various homes around the country !... ( not all owned by me, though ! ! ! ! ! ! ).

My father was a cabinet maker by trade, and he always used to drill the wall, then insert the relevant sized "off cut" wooden plugs he made... he would then level up the mounting, and precisely mark the end of the wooden plug, and drill a small pilot hole. Then he would "hang" the shelf, or whatever on using the brackets, as necessary.. often he would insert a longer screw than was necessary, just to be able to hang the shelf at one end, by finger tightening the first couple of threads ( of if a heavier job,... just screw it in further with a screwdriver)  then fix the other end properly.... first time.

 

I have followed the practice !... I did try using the famous Rawlplug tool, and those fibre , and later, plastic Rawlplugs...but they always seemed to pull out, when doing the "fixed it" test... by giving it a good tug ! ! ! .

 

Recently I fitted our 46" telly to the wall,.... never had  the  problem with the wood plugs made to measure ! ! ...

Highlighted
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 29,610
Thanks: 3,067
Fixes: 458
Registered: ‎14-04-2007

Re: Openreach Tools.

I recently fixed a 55" TV to my chimney breast via a substantial bracket.

The bracket came with a set of 5 fixings which included large plastic plugs and large screws.

We drilled the wall with the recommended size drill and fitted the plugs and screws. A good tug and out they came.

I popped down to Tool station and bought some expanding bolts (Rawlbolts).

These required a slightly larger hole but tightened up very securely.

I am still a little nervous when moving the TV on its bracket but I'm getting there.

 

@shutter I can remember using home made wooden plugs years ago and they are still doing their job today.

Customer and Forum Moderator. Windows 10 Firefox 79.0 (64-bit)