cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

New Fence panels

Community Veteran
Posts: 16,820
Thanks: 1,112
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

New Fence panels

Next door neighbour has taken a drastic step, to replace the whole of the wooden fencing panels between our gardens....
Two of the old panels were blown down in a recent storm... we expected them to just replace them.... however... the new fence panels are at least  9 inches higher than the old fence, much better quality, ( no complaint there ! ).. BUT.. I think the fencing guys have made a blunder and put the panels in wrongly....
I have always been under the impression that the "good" side should be facing "out" of your property... i.e. you, as the owner, get to look at the "back" side of the panels.
I can understand this, when it is (say) an exterior fence, i.e. one that faces the road, but does the same rule/law apply for separation between properties?
30 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,380
Thanks: 2
Registered: 18-01-2013

Re: New Fence panels

Nope - you pay for a decent looking panel, you get to look at a decent looking panel  Grin
Our neighbours all have the reinforcing bars of the panels facing us and we have the backside of our fence facing them.
Thunderclap
Grafter
Posts: 673
Registered: 08-09-2008

Re: New Fence panels

Cool You're right. Generally speaking...
The posts of your fence go inside your boundary facing into your land and, the face of the fence, runs along the edge of your boundary, facing outwards.
This way everyone knows whose fence it is.
TORPC
Grafter
Posts: 5,163
Registered: 08-12-2013

Re: New Fence panels

Save confusion
alternate the panels,
That way both sets of neighbours gets a look in Wink
Or get them to buy double the amount, & fix then back to back facing your garden Smiley
Community Veteran
Posts: 16,820
Thanks: 1,112
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: New Fence panels

Yeah... I thought I was right.... but is there a "law" or is it one of those "unwritten" rules... that seem to have cropped up.....
The fence posts, are concrete posts.. so the fence panels slot into them... ( understand about the post being "inside" the boundary, ) so these posts are part of the fence line... ( they are still on his side of the boundary line though.. so not complaining about them).... just the way the panels have been fitted ....
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,894
Thanks: 3
Registered: 20-10-2012

Re: New Fence panels

Up here it's normal to present the 'best' side of the fence to your neighbour!
That way, there is no doubt as to who the fence belongs to.
Geoff,
York.
pwatson
Rising Star
Posts: 2,468
Thanks: 8
Fixes: 1
Registered: 26-11-2012

Re: New Fence panels

It's conventional to put the panel in with the good side facing you neighbour, but not law
http://www.boundary-problems.co.uk/boundary-problems/fences.html#Your neighbour's fence
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 16,521
Thanks: 1,778
Fixes: 123
Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: New Fence panels

Last time I erected a fence was 20 or so years ago. We used concrete posts with the wooden slats between the posts and not behind them and it looked rather good but the neighbours did get the better view as I understood it to be convention rather than law.
I remember being told one reason for having the posts on your side is that you would need permission from the neighbour to access his side to fix the slats on properly.

Forum Moderator and Customer
Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear - Mark Twain
He who feared he would not succeed sat still

Community Veteran
Posts: 5,314
Thanks: 462
Fixes: 1
Registered: 21-03-2011

Re: New Fence panels

Using this historic example, the good side faces your neighbours.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,826
Thanks: 44
Fixes: 1
Registered: 24-09-2008

Re: New Fence panels

  Sad  surrounded by drystone walls Sad
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,770
Thanks: 33
Fixes: 1
Registered: 08-10-2010

Re: New Fence panels

Which side is the barbed wire, and do the floodlights not keep you awake at night? Wink
I think, legally, as long as the fencing does not encroach on your property the neighbour can erect them in any way they like- observing local planning laws etc, of course.
Community Veteran
Posts: 16,820
Thanks: 1,112
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: New Fence panels

yeah,... well... a bit "academic" now.... will just have to put up with it !.... and get used to it.... mind you.. it is 100% better than what was there before, even if it is the backside ( not avoiding swear filter, O.J. !)
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,314
Thanks: 462
Fixes: 1
Registered: 21-03-2011

Re: New Fence panels

Quote from: journeys
... surrounded by drystone walls ...

repair costs at £80 per Sq M for labour
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
itsme
Grafter
Posts: 5,924
Thanks: 1
Registered: 07-04-2007

Re: New Fence panels

Quote from: Mav
I remember being told one reason for having the posts on your side is that you would need permission from the neighbour to access his side to fix the slats on properly.

No that's not the reason, below is.
Quote from: doris
I think, legally, as long as the fencing does not encroach on your property the neighbour can erect them in any way they like- observing local planning laws etc, of course.

As the posts have to be on the owner side of the garden it they then fix the panels their side they effectively given their neighbours part of their garden 
Thunderclap
Grafter
Posts: 673
Registered: 08-09-2008

Re: New Fence panels

Cool The convention exists because the flat face of the fence is also the boundry line. So are those fence posts inside or outside of your neighbours boundary? You can have a fence any way around provided there is a clear demarcation as to where the boundary is. This could be a length of wire or a chain link fence in front of the posts. By the convention, if the fence face is their boundary, then they have either moved their boundary into their property [ by the width of the posts ] or, have placed their posts in your property - without your permission. The problem you and your neighbour have is when it comes to selling, a surveyor should pick up on the fence issue straight away - which will delay a sale. I cannot emphasise enough that boundary disputes are a real deal breaker in house sales.
Shocked As a side, I recently came across this genuine boundary dispute. A guy could not park his new car up his sideway so, when his neighbour was away on holiday, he moved the fence belonging to his neighbour, one meter into his neighbour's boundary - all five meters in length. When returning from holiday and finding the fence moved, the neighbour ( who has mobility problems ) was informed by the guy that, "boundaries are not legally enforcable" and he can put their fence anywhere he wanted! After months of red tape and a legal dispute involving the Council, the Land Registry and the Police, the stubborn guy was told to put the fence back where he found it - plus pay all costs. There was one small problem though; the guy was not the landowner, but was just renting the property! The actual landowner is an absentee offshore landlord. The fence stayed put because mainting boundaries is the landowners responsibility, not a tenants.