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Motoring topic

Community Veteran
Posts: 3,291
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Registered: ‎10-08-2007

Re: Motoring topic

I agree many drivers have no idea on the best use of lights to suit the conditions.
I always think if you are behind a car with it's foglights on from the fog the week before, is this driver in control of the vehicle? They obviously have no idea of the dashboard indicators and are not focused on their driving. I always give them a wide berth
Same applies to drivers who use sidelights in daylight fog. I bet they only know when they have dipped beam on when it is dark.
Having said that I have been in such thick fog that I have had to turn of the dipped beam and foglights because I could see better on side lights. it is times like that you appreciate coloured studs on the motorway to know which lane you are in.
Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎10-08-2007

Re: Motoring topic

Quote from: pierre_pierre
it seems strange and the Police dont approve, but it is still legal to drive in a 30 limit with just side lights on

If it's not raining
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: Motoring topic

road vehicle lighting regs
Quote
Requirements about the use of headlamps and front fog lamps
    25.—(1)  Save as provided in paragraph (2), no person shall use, or cause or permit to be used, on a road a vehicle which is fitted with obligatory dipped-beam headlamps unless every such lamp is kept lit-
      (a)  during the hours of darkness, except on a road which is a restricted road for the purposes of section 81 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 by virtue of a system of street lighting when it is lit; and

My bold, you only need headlamps in a lit 30 limit when visibility is less than 100 m
Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎10-08-2007

Re: Motoring topic

The Highway Code
113-116: Lighting requirements
Quote
115
You should also
    * use dipped headlights, or dim-dip if fitted, at night in built-up areas and in dull daytime weather, to ensure that you can be seen

pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: Motoring topic

Quote
113
You MUST
    * ensure all sidelights and rear registration plate lights are lit between sunset and sunrise
    * use headlights at night, except on a road which has lit street lighting. These roads are generally restricted to a speed limit of 30 mph (48 km/h) unless otherwise specified

Quote

115
You should also
    * use dipped headlights, or dim-dip if fitted, at night in built-up areas and in dull daytime weather, to ensure that you can be seen


you can be prosecute for disabaying a you must  but not a you should
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,291
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Registered: ‎10-08-2007

Re: Motoring topic

If it is raining and I have to use the wipers my headlight are on.
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: Motoring topic

I  dont disagree with that, my previous was headed, the law still says but the police dont like it
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: Motoring topic

In Scandanavia all moving vehicle have to have the healight on, i.e. Volvo.
before we joined EU, British cars were fitted with Dim Dip headlight for a period of time, probably mid 60's these came on automacially with the side light, when we stated to build cars to the Euro Standard we reverted to normal headlights
MuppetGrinder
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Registered: ‎10-10-2008

Re: Motoring topic

Effectively there is no hard and fast legal minimum on visibility, that's why the HC stated "generaly" before it gave a distance, It's quoted from the Road Vehicles Lighting Act 1989 which fails at any point to stipulate a legal minimum for visability before it is classed as "seriously reduced".  The choice over the legality is therefor entirely at the discretion of whichever judge you might get drawn up infront of.  Although there are so many variables to account for that it would probably never get that far.
I personally prefer it if other drivers are able to see where they are going as this makes it a lot easier for them to avoid me, other road users, trees, children - you get the idea.  Without a doubt all vehicles should be forced to come with front and rear fog lights if they are to be sold in the UK.  You see front fog's are as much for the benefit of others as they are for the owner of them, they let oncoming vehicles see a better representation of a vehicle with relation to it's size and position on the road.  It would also help if people were educated (even if it's by themselves) on how and when it would be best to use them.
The bigger problem in my eyes are the total idiots that drive about with only one functioning headlamp.  You know, the ones you think are motorbikes right up untill you are on top of them.
I am 110% behind making people better, safer drivers, but it's not just us car owners that are the problem on the roads. I personaly think time would be better spent explaining to cycle shops and dumb ass cyclists alike that those stupid flashing lights people use on thir bikes are not legal (not that all cyclists are dumb or asses, only the ones who fit flashing lights) this is an exctract from the RVLA1989:
Lamps to show a steady light
    13.—(1)  Save as provided in paragraph (2), no vehicle shall be fitted with a lamp which automatically emits a flashing light.
    (2)  Paragraph (1) does not apply in respect of-
(a)  a direction indicator;
(b)  a headlamp fitted to an emergency vehicle;
(c)  a warning beacon or special warning lamp;
(d)  a lamp or illuminated sign fitted to a vehicle used for police purposes;
(e)  a green warning lamp used as an anti-lock brake indicator; or
(f)  lamps forming part of a traffic sign.
See...bikes aint on the list, neither are "helmets of cyclists", or "the clothing of cyclists".  PLEASE can we beat it into these people that it's better to have an ugly big constant light on you bike than a fasionable useless flashing one. Even on a clear night they are nothing but a distraction and a hazard, in poor visability they are a deathtrap.
There, I said my bit Smiley.
pierre_pierre
Grafter
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Re: Motoring topic

Havnt got time, getting shut eye problem, but I think the British law say they must be incandesant element, ie led are out as should be those horrible blueish things, but we are now regulated by the EU regs that probably allow them
Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎30-08-2007

Re: Motoring topic

As an aside to the (front) fog light issue, a few years ago a colleague used to drive a Ford Escort RS Turbo, and was constantly (er! lets be sensible about constantly, it happened quite a few times) being pulled by the police for driving with her "fog" lights on in clear conditions. To the point where she used to have the cars handbook bookmarked to the page where those lights were described as "driving lamps" not fog lights, a small nicety that Ford used to indulge in in those days. Apparently she used to get away with it, the fact that she was singularly attractive (and knew it) probably helped as well. And, just so I'm not shot down in flames by the sexist lobby, she was a very very good driver.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,100
Registered: ‎05-04-2007

Re: Motoring topic

Driving lamps and fog lamps throw different types of beam pattern. The former being long and narrow as opposed to wide and short. With regard to fog I do remember one time (a few years ago now) that I drove into a fog bank that was so thick that neither full or dipped beam were any use at seeing where the road was. it was late at night and I didn't have fog lamps. Ended up using a spot lamp held very low to illuminate the road at it could not be seen at the front of the bumper with out it. I new the road well but was glad when I came out of that fog. I had thought of staying put, but their was no where to pull over and I didn't trust people coming up behind as literally you drove round the bed into the dense fog bank.
My personal pet hate is mini roundabouts, I wish more people would learn how to use them correctly.
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: Motoring topic

Quote
My personal pet hate is mini roundabouts, I wish more people would learn how to use them correctly.

not to say I do it, but the correct way is treat them as if they have a four foot wall and drive round them, unless you are a large vehicle, then you have to drive over them.
jmd
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Re: Motoring topic

Yes, I hate foglights on when not at all needed - but then I also hate these ultra bright headlights that some cars seem to have - when they come behind you and then you are blinded by them!  Another one of my hates too is lack of indicators when you have to guess what the cars coming round roundabout are going to do next!
I find mini-roundabouts a nuisance as most people just ignore them.
Lurker
Grafter
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Registered: ‎23-10-2008

Re: Motoring topic

Sorry to have to correct a few misconceptions here, but they are ones which I shared until relatively recently.
Firstly, the law was changed recently to allow for flashing lamps to be attached to bicycles. (It always allowed for flashing lamps to be attached to the person, whether cycling or not)
Quote
60
At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp.
[Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24)]

Secondly, a few respected motoring organisations are lobbying to have the rules changed regarding front fog lights.
The basis of the argument is that the lights don't dazzle oncoming traffic, since by design they spread the light low and wide.
I disagree and think that folks shouldn't be using their front fog lights as a general rule, however as I often drive in rural areas on unlit roads, the reality is that the light pattern from front mounted fog-lights is ideally suited to lighting up the verges and edges of roads which are not clearly defined as they are by kerbs in residential areas.
What to do?
Badly aligned and badly adjusted headlights are a larger menace IMO, and there are already laws in place to cover most instances of this abuse. It doesn't stop it (if anything it appears to be on the increase!)
(Oh BTW, I turn off my front fog lights whenever I see approaching traffic, in much the same way as I do my main beams.)