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Liquid Air

Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Liquid Air

Could this be part of the answer to our energy problems,
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19785689
It's great to hear about individuals beavering away in their garages and workshops on ideas like this.
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Community Veteran
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Re: Liquid Air

I remember seeing that on the news a while back.
With all the rainfall we get in this country though, I am surpised that we don't have more damns and hydro-electric power stations especially now our summers are becoming wetter and wetter.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
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Re: Liquid Air

That was my speciality a few years ago. The problem is that you have to weigh the cost of building a hydro plant against the payback time, and that depends on the average yearly water flow available at the location you are considering. Studies have shown that there aren't any sites in England and Wales which are now suitable (except for relatively tiny power outputs), and only a few in Scotland. We still aren't wet enough!
The Severn Barrage might just reappear though, damns or no damns!!!!    Grin
Community Veteran
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Re: Liquid Air

Quote from: nozzer
only a few in Scotland.

Talking of which (c'mon, you knew I'd derail a thread at some point  Crazy) whats that up near the old Riccarton Junction? - Where Plashetts station once was and called Kielder water? - Is that a reservoir? Could that no be used for power somehow?
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
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Re: Liquid Air

It already is. There's details of other UK sites on this link too. All small stuff.
http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/en/312572/rwe-innogy/sites/hydroelectric-power-station/united-kingdom/sit...
Community Veteran
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Re: Liquid Air

Ah, ok thanks for that, I didn't know! I've seen it on google earth a few times (looking at old railway routes etc) but didn't know it was a power generating place.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
itsme
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Re: Liquid Air

Quote from: nozzer
It already is. There's details of other UK sites on this link too. All small stuff.
http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/en/312572/rwe-innogy/sites/hydroelectric-power-station/united-kingdom/sit...

There are more small Hydro power plants than what is on RWE list. Two that I know of being a whitewater kayaker are Lake Vyrnwy and Llyn Celyn.
GrahamC
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Registered: 19-07-2009

Re: Liquid Air

Hydro would not be of any use in the other nine months of the year when we are in drought conditions It was only at the beginning of July that the SE ended it's hosepipe ban.
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Re: Liquid Air

Quote

take in air, remove the CO2 and water vapour (these would freeze otherwise)
the remaining air, mostly nitrogen, is chilled to -190C (-310F)


so,.... it isn`t really "air" as we breathe it... it is "mostly nitrogen".... therefore... not really.... liquid air... and chilling nitrogen is not "new tech".... just the way of using it, and storing the stuff....
And, yes, I remember seeing something along these lines on a news prog a couple of years ago...
David_W
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Registered: 19-07-2007

Re: Liquid Air

I think it's how it's obtained shutter.  Wind farms produce energy any time there is wind, so when there is no requirement for that energy it just goes to waste, by using the energy to chill out the air and storing it we'll be able to use that supply when there is demand but no wind, and naturally when it's used it should produce heat which can be captured and stored so it should be pretty efficient, well, eventually.
Community Veteran
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Re: Liquid Air

In fact this could be used by the PN staff as a standby cooling mechanism in their data centre in the event of an air conditioning failure. Have a large Dewar flask filled with liquid air (topped up each night - with cheap electricity). If the air conditioning fails all they'll need to do is, using a step ladder, place a bucket of liquid air on the top of each server cabinet. The liquid expands to 700 times its volume, so that would create an air flow too.
They could also use spare liquid air to keep their offices cool - a galvanised steel bucket under each desk.
What could possibly go wrong?
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itsme
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Re: Liquid Air

Quote from: GrahamC
Hydro would not be of any use in the other nine months of the year when we are in drought conditions It was only at the beginning of July that the SE ended it's hosepipe ban.

Most of the hydro's are part of reservoirs that feed rivers so will generate electricity in the drier months.