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It weren't like that at primary school

Luzern
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It weren't like that at primary school

ON the cusp of 80 I have a grandson in his year before last at his junior school. My memory of end of year reports  is a single sheet marked with A,B,C,D, with perhaps a+or - added according to how you did; things like "could try harder". Simples!

But not today! Now its something nearing 10 pages, that tell the parent if child is performing above, at or below Age Related Expectations. The teachers' remarks are now more detailed. And here's the pièce de résistance; the kids have to write a self appraisal with review aims etc. Proud granddad admits the kid is very able, and the appraisal looked like a CV.

How less talented kids manage, or how much time teachers have to put towards the job I don't know, but talk of their short hours etc seems born of ignorance.

Out of school kid has done some instrumental exams. Would you believe it!? Success according to mark obtained gets points to ward  Uni!

What a changed world it is.

 

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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rongtw
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

YUP , schools nowadys are all concerned with targets Sad

my youngest 12 for some reason teacher has taken exception to him as we moving his school , recently changed to academy Crazy2 but its a islamic academy .

anyhow so they as he moves in september they resricted his hours , 9 till 1.15 ,, Why Huh? because it shows on their report he atttended ,,, He got is mark , so they show for him 100% attendence

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Re: It weren't like that at primary school


Luzern wrote:

The teachers' remarks are now more detailed.


That's so true it used to be variations of the usual and must try harder.

And now the remarks are "more detailed". The wonder of modern teaching. The wonder of "cut and paste".

Luzern
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

Ah cut'n paste! I think it is sometimes justified. It depends on the school and teachers' attitudes. Fortunately the areas my children were raised in were not militant hotspots, same as for one set of grand-kids. Another daughter, an ex primary teacher, lives in a nice area on the edge of Bristol, Because of the bad schools all three have been home educated, the eldest has done GCSE, and will be joining a school for A Levels

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school


Luzern wrote:

But not today! Now its something nearing 10 pages, that tell the parent if child is performing above, at or below Age Related Expectations. The teachers' remarks are now more detailed. And here's the pièce de résistance; the kids have to write a self appraisal with review aims etc. Proud granddad admits the kid is very able, and the appraisal looked like a CV. 


It worries me how much pressure kids are under these days at school. It seems that they're treated like machines expected to perform a task with precision or they're unacceptable.

On the self appraisal thing I think it's bonkers. Ok I know they have to justify the expense of all those expensive school computers somehow but this is absurd. It seems to me that they're all being prepared for office jobs and reports... we can't have an entire nation turned into bean counters and call centre workers... we do need other jobs to keep this country going...

I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

Ask a modern primary school kid to recite the "12 times table" and look at their baffled face.

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Luzern
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

 

Not disputing your post, but is the ability to parrot something learned by rote a test of abilty in numbers for everyday adult life? I'm not so sure. Just because someone knows something does not mean one can use it successfully.

Moderator's note by Mike (Mav): Full quote of preceding post removed as per Forum rules

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
Minivanman
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

Over sixty years years ago I remember running home with my school report because the teacher had commented "seems rather vague at times" - I thought it meant 'artistic', my dad thought it deserved a clip around the ear!

 

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
Minivanman
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

Try asking a 70 year old.

Apart form 5's and 10's I was and have never been able to learn my times tables, it just makes no sense to me.  I'm sure there must be a maths version of dyslexia. As for being able to deduct those numbers on a dartboard....

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
Minivanman
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

Education and intelligence are not always the same thing.

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
Luzern
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school


Minivanman wrote:

Try asking a 70 year old.

Apart form 5's and 10's I was and have never been able to learn my times tables, it just makes no sense to me.  I'm sure there must be a maths version of dyslexia. As for being able to deduct those numbers on a dartboard....


Dyscalculia

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Minivanman
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

Thanks, I knew it!..... although I'm not sure I like the sound of having had a 'brain disorder' Sad
 
dyscalculia
ˌdɪskalˈkjuːlɪə/
noun
PSYCHIATRY
  1. severe difficulty in making arithmetical calculations, as a result of brain disorder.
     
     
All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

At my Primary School it  was up to and including the 13 times table to answer by rote and snap questions. I  could understand the need for the 12 times table because we had 12 pennies to the shilling and 20 shillings to the pound. Of course we had to handle fractions for money calculation including farthings and ha'pennies. The closest thing we had to a desk calculator was a book containing pre-printed tables of fractions and multiples, these were strictly not allowed in class.

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Luzern
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school


Minivanman wrote:
Thanks, I knew it!..... although I'm not sure I like the sound of having had a 'brain disorder' Sad
 
dyscalculia
ˌdɪskalˈkjuːlɪə/
noun
PSYCHIATRY
  1. severe difficulty in making arithmetical calculations, as a result of brain disorder.
     
     

I just like showing off!Tongue 

How are you with music and language(s)? It does seem from various articles that there is some sort of correlation between maths and those two. What it is I do not know, but my guess is to participate actively, some ability in pattern recognition is required. That applies to both language and music. It's but a guess.

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: It weren't like that at primary school

I did both maths and music at 'A' in school and I feel there is definitely a correlation between the two.

 

AlaricAdair wrote:

At my Primary School it  was up to and including the 13 times table to answer by rote and snap questions. I  could understand the need for the 12 times table because we had 12 pennies to the shilling and 20 shillings to the pound. Of course we had to handle fractions for money calculation including farthings and ha'pennies. The closest thing we had to a desk calculator was a book containing pre-printed tables of fractions and multiples, these were strictly not allowed in class.

Calculators were a new thing as I approached my 'O' Levels and were frowned upon in the class and definitely not allowed during exams. I understand that they are now and I feel that is a big mistake.

 

I think learning the twelve times tables has helped tremendously with mathematical mental agility over the years and makes larger calculations easier to do in my head or on paper without resorting to a calculator.

 

I still remember an argument years ago with my step-daughter over a reasonably simple calculation for her homework that I informed her she had got wrong. She showed me the display which disagreed with my result. She typed it in again with the same answer as before. How can the calculator be wrong, she shouted. I asked her to enter the digits in front of me and it transpires that each time she has transposed two digits giving the error.Wink

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