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Is there a car mechanic in the house?

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Aspiring Legend
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Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Is there a car mechanic in the house?

Is there a car mechanic in the house and if so, any idea how this can be sorted as I don't even know what it's called!

My 2006 Fiesta came back from it's MOT yesterday which it passed OK, but with no mention of this worrying (to me at least) section under they battery tray and that has become quite rusty I guess because of all those unavoidable screen washer fills over the years.

Not given it a really close check, but maybe it's something that can be replaced by taking out the battery tray and then unbolting what looks like some sort of engine mounting. 

Done the usual on-line checks but nothing found and nothing to describe what it is or how to change it. It certainly looks to far gone to paint with a bit of red oxide or something that's for sure.

 

IMG_3014.JPG

 

 

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Anonymous
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

I’m no mechanic but it looks to me to be part of the main body of the car, as I’m assuming the bulge at the back where the cable and clip is is your wheel arch? You can see spot welds above the wire and it looks to be the same part that's all rusty.

It may well be easier to cut it out with a gas axe and weld plate in place.

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Aspiring Legend
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

Thanks @Anonymous 

Don't think it's welded, looks like it's bolted onto the bulkhead and wheel arch with rivet bushes - hank rivet bushes I think they are called.

I suppose I could just take it back down to our local one man garage (he does a pre MOT check for me) and ask his opinion. 

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Anonymous
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

On closer inspection I see the bolt now so you may be able to do a bolt on replacement, but by you time you remove that really rusty and possible seized nut you may well end up tearing the metal on to which it is bolted.

If you do take it down to the garage I'll bet they favour the welding option for its replacement.

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Aspiring Hero
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

@Minivanman 

Those maintenance-free batteries usually have a small ventilation hole at either one or both ends, near the top of the battery, at the end/s of the sealing cover which is over where the top-up fillers would have been if it was not maintenance-free, if you get my drift.

I don't want to sound alarmist, but an overcharging battery can sometimes spit it's electrolyte out of said holes.  Not saying it's been doing that, just that it's a possibility.  However, where I've seen that years ago, normally there would be a whitish deposit, presumably where the acid had 'got to work'.

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Hero
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

Tap it with a screwdriver to see if it's solid. If it's not holed then take the battery box out and clean the base plate up with a steel wire cup brush in an electric drill. Then paint with something like Kurust before finishing with  Hammerite. If it's holed you could still clean it up then bolt a plate over the top. It doesn't look to be structural so the emphasis should be on stopping the rot from progressing.

Using a cheap funnel when topping up the washers could help.

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Rising Star
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

Fake a migraine and get your wife to call Car SOS?

Pete
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

@RobPN 

I did wonder about the electrolyte but the battery was replaced for a new one (it still had the original!) last year so..

@Baldrick1 

I'm hoping that's what I'll be able to do and yes, we should use a funnel when filling, but who does? Smiley

@Anonymous 

Yes, need to be careful there but I'd have given it a good squirt with some WD40 followed by an overnight soak before trying to shift them! 

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Hero
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?


@Minivanman wrote:

@Baldrick1 

... yes, we should use a funnel when filling, but who does? Smiley

I'm afraid that I keep a funnel with a gallon of ready of mixed washer fluid, so me I'm afraid.

Regarding WD40, I believe that it's a silicone based lubricant so care is needed with it if you want to paint surfaces after using it. Personally I would use Plusgas unless I could do the job without needing to remove difficult fixings.


 

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Rising Star
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?


@Minivanman wrote:

we should use a funnel when filling, but who does? Smiley

 

I cut the top half off a plastic milk carton and use that as a funnel - the top of the carton fits nicely into the filler cap.

Pete
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Aspiring Legend
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

@Crunchie 

I should but I never have.... and now to late to start and besides, I can never time it right before it suddenly spurts out - but that's been the story of my life. Wink

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Pro
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

You don't want to do it like this 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYSSYm0b2wk

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Community Veteran
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

For the rust I'd personally use Hammerite Rust Remover Gel. You can get a tub of it from Halfords for about £11-12 last time i bought some (several years back - about 5).

Don't bother following the instructions which will waste your time and lead to disappointment (leave it on, stir every 20 mins etc). Instead just chuck loads on, leave it overnight (or a couple of days) then wipe away thoroughly. You'll find that unlike the method the instructions say to use, leaving it there undisturbed will eat away the rust and leave shiny metal. I know from personal experience. The first time i used it I rang hammerite after following their instructions for hours and seeing no results - they refunded me by cheque. Accidentally dropped a blob on another bit of metal, thought nothing of it, wiped it off the next day when i needed that part and the rust was gone. Chucked a few rusty nuts and bolts into a tray of the stuff for a day and same result. Don't leave it longer than 2 days though or you'll start to see white growth on the metal instead - some other sort of chemical reaction. Just wipe the stuff off, use a wire brush if needed and then paint over with red oxide / hammerite and then spray over if needed. Red oxide is meant to be better for painting over but I've always preferred normal black hammerite if i'm honest.

I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
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Aspiring Pro
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?

To fix it properly it is a welding job,been there years ago,i would go down the hammerite route.Smiley

https://www.flickr.com/photos/james_bingham/
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Pro
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Re: Is there a car mechanic in the house?


@jockwav wrote:

To fix it properly it is a welding job,been there years ago,i would go down the hammerite route.Smiley


Certainly looks like a welding job to me.

To the OP be careful if you start "derusting" as experience says that you start off with a rusty patch, and end up with a much larger area to be replaced. Of course if the metal has disintegrated you need to know. . .

Impossible to say whether it's safe or not without proper examination.

Personally I'd give it a dose of Waxoyl if it's not at the welding stage yet.