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Infrared heating

Community Veteran
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Infrared heating

as outlined here  http://www.infraredheatpanels.com/what-is-infrared-heating/
Produces IR heat at 50-60% cheaper than traditional heating methods.
Anyone have any experience with IR heating panels?
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Community Veteran
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Re: Infrared heating

No but i did know someone once years ago who swore by their IR lamp - apparently good for back pain?
If anyone knows how those patio heaters work though withough all the heat going up i'd be grateful for the knowledge lol
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PembsPanther
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Re: Infrared heating

There is a good resource here but I am not sure it fully answers your question:
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/heating-and-cooling/infrared-heaters.htm
dick:quote
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Re: Infrared heating

By what I can see they are electric heaters and being infrared is immaterial
If you convert electrical energy to heat energy in a space, say a room, the space will be heated but the mechanism will not affect efficiency. You will still have to pay for each kilowatt and electrical energy is expensive.
The claims on the website are in error at best and intentionally misleading at worst
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Re: Infrared heating

Infrared heaters can be more 'efficient' in a specific way.
True, all electric heaters convert pretty much 100% of the electrical input into heat so they're all equally efficient but there are ways of making the heat output more effective thus requiring less heat.  A good example is in a goods warehouse (large open space, high roof, often open large door for goods), heating this kind of space is very expensive if you try to maintain a comfortable space temperature but infrared heaters can be positioned to locally heat areas occupied by workers - not so much raising the air temperature in these areas but radiating 'warmth' in the working area allowing people to be comfortable even though the surrounding air temperature is below comfort level.
Call me 'w23'
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Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
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Re: Infrared heating

@w23 I agree but would you want that in your lounge?
Also in my experience industrial radiant heaters have been gas  Smiley
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Community Veteran
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Re: Infrared heating

Gas is often used for industrial radiant heating but only if the requirement is more than a couple of kW, small electric heaters of 1kW or 2kW are cheap and suitable for, say, a packing bench area in my warehouse example - the cost of installing a gas one would not be worth the saving in running cost in that particular example.
I do remember my granny had a quartz glow electric radiant heater in her bathroom many years ago (before central heating), mounted at high level with a pull-cord switch.  This heater could make you fell quite warm even though there was frost on the inside of the window.
Call me 'w23'
At any given moment in the universe many things happen. Coincidence is a matter of how close these events are in space, time and relationship.
Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
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Re: Infrared heating

The most efficient way of heating humans is microwave energy. Can't see any downside to that method.
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Re: Infrared heating

Microwave or infrared? I've heard that microwaves are used in some commercial greenhouse systems as the heat the plants directly so are much more efficient than alternatives.
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Re: Infrared heating

Microwaves are for baked potatoes lol  Cheesy
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MJN
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Re: Infrared heating

We've got a radiant heater (this one) in our conservatory and can confirm it works very well.
As w23 correctly points out, whilst all electric heaters are 100% efficient in terms of 'watts in = watts out' there can be variations in the effective heat transfer from different types of heaters. In the case of a conservatory, the roof is generally a poor heat insulator and so any heater that relies on convection (such as a conventional wall 'radiator' despite what the name might suggest!) can often perform poorly because the heated air simply rises straight up and has much of the energy lost through convection to the outside. The loss is exacerbated with a pitched roof, as often common with conservatories, given the negative impact this has on circulating air currents.
A radiant heater, on the other hand, transfers most (not all) of its generated heat directly to the objects in its sight line. Thus, in the conservatory situation this is the furniture and people within. The heat emitted to, and absorbed by, the people obviously benefits directly however the other objects in the room also reflect their received heat hence why they feel warm to the touch too.
In the case of the Ducasa it works extremely well. It is surprising, on many levels, that you really can 'feel' the heat from it a couple of metres away (not 'hot' by any stretch but it's not meant to be to function effectively). Moreover, having compared it with a freestanding 1.25kW 'convection' heater (which, again, is also 100% efficient) the difference in effectiveness is definitely noticeable. I wouldn't want to make or support any particular claims of quantifying the improvement as there are just too many variables between different situations to be meaningful. Also, 1.25kW costs the same regardless of heat transfer type with all electric heaters but the point is that those that are more effective, such as radiant heaters in this scenario, will be running for less time per given occupancy period.
In case there's any suspicion of 'post-purchase rationalisation' having forked out a whole load of money for it I should point out that it was practically free.  Someone bought two but only fitted one so put the spare up for sale on eBay many months later in the middle of summer and, unsurprisingly perhaps, only got one (my) bid! I had nothing to lose by buying it for a tenner and similarly no false incentive to justify keeping it if it didn't perform.
The initial and primary attraction was its size and form factor (the dwarf wall was the only viable location for one) and so the performance benefits were very much a surprise side effect. Is it worth the £177 retail price for the radiant heater when a convection heater can be found for, what, £20? From a cost perspective the return on investment would be some time and hence up for debate however from an effectiveness and comfort perspective I would argue it is based on my experience.
P.S. I always raise a smile when talking about heating conservatories as my Dad always used to say that they are such poor environments to heat you might as well go the whole hog and plumb in a radiator outside to heat your garden whilst you're at it....  Wink
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Re: Infrared heating

@MJN, interesting post thank you, was surprised to see 20% VAT, I've been quoted 5% VAT on fuel and heating items as per https://www.gov.uk/rates-of-vat-on-different-goods-and-services
Quote
Electric storage heaters 5% VAT Notice 708/6
Gas-fired boilers 5% VAT Notice 708/6
Gas room heaters with thermostatic controls 5% VAT Notice 708/6
Oil-fired boilers 5% VAT Notice 708/6
Radiators 5% VAT Notice 708/6
MJN
Aspiring Pro
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Re: Infrared heating

Skimming through the VAT notice it would appear that the items listed only attract the reduced rate if funded through grants. Thus, purchasing directly from a retailer as a consumer-to-business transaction would attract the normal 20%.