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In the days before Woke

shutter
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Re: In the days before Woke

Two of my favourite "welsh" sayings..... when in conversation with a welsh speaker, who is actually speaking English...

during the conversation you will often hear....  "Well,..... There you are then!"..... and you can emphasize that in so many different ways..... 

Well, .... There you are, then.

 

Well..... There you are then

 

Well... There you are then

 

Well.... There you are, then

and a bit of sarcasm in the voice for this one...

Well... There you are..... THEN....

 

Other one is, when you are a stranger to the area..... stop to ask directions... and you can guarantee, if there is a roundabout involved in the journey...       ."you go straight up round, and over by thur"....  making sure you notice which direction the person is waving his arms ! ! ...

Minivanman
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Re: In the days before Woke

@shutter 

Also need to watch out for ‘by yer’ or ‘by there’ when being given directions in Wales. 

'By yer' is to the left and 'by there' is to the right.

Used to really confuse me when I first came to live here.


Don't limit the friends you haven't met with arguments you'll never have.
gleneagles
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Re: In the days before Woke

Even groups of people can have there own slang….

Seemed to recall market traders in London had their own slang years ago…..

Even the word market trader makes people think of financial markets rather than those selling stuff from stalls.

 

We are born into history and history is born into us.
shutter
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Re: In the days before Woke


@Minivanman wrote:

@shutter 

Also need to watch out for ‘by yer’ or ‘by there’ when being given directions in Wales. 

'By yer' is to the left and 'by there' is to the right.

Used to really confuse me when I first came to live here.



Yup... that can be confusing too !....

 

Minivanman
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Re: In the days before Woke

Just been having a conversation about using the term 'Oriental' as a descriptor and not knowing the answer I did a little googling.

Hmm, interesting.

The term ‘Oriental’ is outdated, but is it racist? - Los Angeles Times (latimes.com)

Anybody remember when I got taken to task here for using the term 'Who flung dung'.  😆

 

 


Don't limit the friends you haven't met with arguments you'll never have.
RobPN
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Re: In the days before Woke


@Minivanman wrote:

 

Anybody remember when I got taken to task here for using the term 'Who flung dung'.  😆


I remember it reary well @Minivanman Wink

Alex
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Re: In the days before Woke

Oooh dear, well my surname is 'Hunt', there are a few first names that don't go well with my surname.
Best not give examples here in public (although I can PM people them 🙂).

Cor - well the clue of my first name is in my forum name here! There are certain other names that I would be straight round the solicitors in the morning if it were my name. Would be getting that changed post haste.

Best shut up there.

Jonpe
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Re: In the days before Woke

The English spelling of words like centre being French no doubt dates back to the Normans who can be credited (blamed?) for giving us so many French words, or Latin words via French in some cases.  Noah Webster popularised American spellings already in existence, like center, color, and check (the method of payment).

Have you noticed that we now have a plural of the pronoun you?  I've heard it a lot on reality shows and when I Googled it, I was surprised to see how widespread it is.  The spelling seems to be yous but I've seen youse.

I wonder if the there now expression is a direct translation from the Celtic languages (where it might have a place) since I've heard it used by Irish people as well.  An Irish neighbour of mature years used to greet people with, "Good morning there now."