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I never would of guessed

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Rising Star
Posts: 4,154
Thanks: 9
Fixes: 1
Registered: ‎15-04-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

@pierre, You may know the anser to this why is Latin and Roman numerals still used?  I get very anoid wen the BBC put the year the Film or program was made in Roman numerals.
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Grafter
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎04-06-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

Has anybody any idea were the dreaded 'those ones' came from?  One is one and all alone, yet it always seems to get pluralised lately.
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Grafter
Posts: 507
Registered: ‎23-02-2010

Re: I never would of guessed


Agree with you Strat about the wonderful mix of dialects.
When we look at many of the words & phrases used, its like as if they had
a language all of their own, and trying to work out what they`re saying
certainly isnt always easy.
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Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

@Midnight  Dont know how your test reader will get on with this, but a full explanation of roman numeral here http://www.web40571.clarahost.co.uk/roman/use.htm
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Grafter
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎20-08-2009

Re: I never would of guessed

Scots language is based upon Doric which is used mainly of the North East coast of Scotland, Lower Scots and Higher Scots both have different language models. The thing about Scotland is that each and every small town will have their own unique words and dialects. For example in Lochgelly people will use the word "stotter" to describe someone that is inappropriately dressed while in Cowdenbeath (2 miles up the road) they will use the word "craw" ie. look at that stotter or look at that craw.
"Out with" has several translations depending in the context it was being used, but is generally meant as "apart from". I never realised that "out with" was a Scots thing and I'm sorry as I am guilty of using this term on this forum.
A good site which allows you to add words, provide translations and pronunciations is:
Scottish: http://www.forvo.com/languages/sco/
English: http://www.forvo.com/languages/en/
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Community Veteran
Posts: 3,291
Thanks: 2
Registered: ‎10-08-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

Thank you for those links
I looked the sites and would warn there are some rudey words on there Tongue
A well known four letter F word is only third in the most popular English list, The most popular is 
Quote
hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia
Huh
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Grafter
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎20-08-2009

Re: I never would of guessed

lol I'm going to have to check that word out Smiley I'm usually just in the Scots section of the site
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Grafter
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎20-08-2009

Re: I never would of guessed

Main Entry:  hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  fear of long words
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Rising Star
Posts: 4,154
Thanks: 9
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Registered: ‎15-04-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

Quote from: pierre_pierre
@Midnight  Dont know how your test reader will get on with this, but a full explanation of roman numeral here http://www.web40571.clarahost.co.uk/roman/use.htm

Thanks but that did not answer my question.  My question was: why is Latin and Roman numerals still used?
Plus I have a Text Reader not a "test reader".
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Grafter
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎20-08-2009

Re: I never would of guessed

IMO probably because it is good to remember our heritage and history
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Community Veteran
Posts: 1,375
Thanks: 33
Registered: ‎07-03-2008

Re: I never would of guessed

To throw a few more examples very often heard these days, not of distortions but using words to fill out a sentence while the speaker has a thought of what to say next or make himself seem more important ie;  By the young particularly, who pop in "like" at every third word (usually). Then are politicians and others spouting about matters on the television with "at this moment in time" where the last two words are entirely redundant!
colintivy
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Grafter
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎20-08-2009

Re: I never would of guessed

In Fife the word "like" or "ye ken" is added to the end of every sentence by young and old, just part of our dialect. In Glasgow they usually end every sentence with "aye but"
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Community Veteran
Posts: 38,460
Thanks: 1,033
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Registered: ‎15-06-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

Quote from: Midnight
Quote from: pierre_pierre
@Midnight  Dont know how your test reader will get on with this, but a full explanation of roman numeral here http://www.web40571.clarahost.co.uk/roman/use.htm

Thanks but that did not answer my question.  My question was: why is Latin and Roman numerals still used?
Plus I have a Text Reader not a "test reader".
As far  as I know there are two reasons given
1. It's traditional - this is the old standby when you don't know the answer
2. The copyright  year on British television programmes is often shown in Roman numerals. For example "©BBC MMX" for 2010. This is a subtle method of making the age of a programme less obvious as most viewers can not read the date in the short time it is shown. For a few years in the 1970s the BBC used "arabic" numerals, for example "©BBC 1976" but decided to switch back to Roman numerals (from Wikipedia) - I can believe that one  Roll_eyes
From another source combining the two
Quote
As far as copyright dates on films and TV shows (and Roman numerals are definitely not only used by the producers of British TV programmes), it might be because it's traditional. Or, if one was to be cynical, it could be to make it difficult for the viewers to determine just how long ago the rubbish they just watched has been sitting on the shelf waiting to be shown. There's certainly no legal requirement that the date of copyright be given in Roman numerals.
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Rising Star
Posts: 4,154
Thanks: 9
Fixes: 1
Registered: ‎15-04-2007

Re: I never would of guessed

Quote from: mentalist3d
IMO probably because it is good to remember our heritage and history

Yes it is good to remember our heritage and history, but why is Latin and Roman numerals still used?
For example on most of the BBC's Copyright notice thay use Roman numerals why?  It is a ded language.
[Edit]
Thank you Oldjim.
I think you hit the nail on the head with:
Quote
As far as copyright dates on films and TV shows (and Roman numerals are definitely not only used by the producers of British TV programmes), it might be because it's traditional. Or, if one was to be cynical, it could be to make it difficult for the viewers to determine just how long ago the rubbish they just watched has been sitting on the shelf waiting to be shown. There's certainly no legal requirement that the date of copyright be given in Roman numerals.
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Seasoned Pro
Posts: 6,852
Thanks: 340
Registered: ‎13-07-2009

Re: I never would of guessed

@ Midnight Caller..
Roman numerals remained in common use until about the 14th century, when they were replaced by Hindu-Arabic numerals (thought to have been introduced to Europe from al-Andalus, by way of Arab traders and arithmetic treatises, around the 11th century). The Roman number system is generally regarded as obsolete in modern usage, but is still seen occasionally. Classical numbering is often used to suggest importance or timelessness, or in other cases where an alternate numbering system is useful for clarity. Examples of their current use include:
Names of monarchs and Popes, e.g. Elizabeth II, Benedict XVI. These are ordinal numbers; e.g. "II" is pronounced "the second".
The year of production of television shows and films.
Hour marks on some clockfaces and timepieces.
The year of construction on some building faces and cornerstones.
Publication dates of books (particularly older ones); page numbering of preliminary pages; volume numbers on spines and chapter numbers.
Film series and sequels of novels and video games (such as Final Fantasy), typically emulating use in older books.
Outlines use I, II, III and i, ii, iii as part of their organizational structure.
A recurring grand event, such as the Olympic Games, Super Bowl, WrestleMania, or the Sprint All-Star Race.
Historic events, such as World War II
Names of Army Corps.
Crossword puzzle clues, particularly cryptic crosswords.
Names of cranial nerves.
Guitar chord diagrams.
Parts of laws, such as Titles (e.g. Civil Rights Act of 1964) or Schedules (e.g. Controlled Substances Act).
Sports teams, indicating the number of players in the squad. In rugby union, the 1st XV of a particular club would be the 1st and best team the club has, likewise for the XIII in rugby league, and XI for football (soccer), field hockey and cricket.
Some countries use Roman numerals to number centuries (instead of "18th century", "XVIII. century" is used). This is uncommon in the English-speaking world.[citation needed]
Call signs of some American television stations (usually based on the station's channel number; such as WXII, KXII, WXIX, WPVI, etc.)
RAF squadrons have two names, there's the standard number name (which is most commonly used) and the Roman numeral name (e.g. No. 15 Squadron RAF or No. XV Squadron RAF
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